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Recalls in May 2013

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    H&M tries to round up remaining recalled children's water bottles

    Company discovers some bottles were sold after the recall was announced

    H & M Hennes & Mauritz, L.P., New York, N.Y., is re-announcing the recall of its children’s water bottles. Some 2,900 bottles were contained in the original recall, which was made in September 2012.

    The company says another 200 were sold after the initial recall, and Consumer Product Safety Commission Media Affairs Director Scott Wolfson tells ConsumerAffairs that prompted the re-announcement.

    The water bottle's spout can break off, posing a choking hazard to children. The company has received one report of an incident in England of the water bottle spout breaking off in a child's mouth as the child was drinking from the bottle. No injuries have been reported.

    The 16-oz. water bottles are pink plastic with a crackle design or blue plastic and flip-top lids in coordinated pink and blue colors. "H&M Sweden" and "www.hm.com" are embossed on the bottom of the bottle.

    The recalled products were manufactured in June 2012 and contain the manufacture date in an embossed date clock on the bottom of the bottle. The inner circle on the clock contains the number 12 with an arrow between the two numbers. The arrow points to the number 6 in an outer circle of numbers.

    The water bottles, manufactured in Italy, were sold exclusively at H&M stores with children's departments nationwide from July 2012 through March 2013 for between $1.50 and $5.

    Consumers should immediately stop using the water bottle and call H&M to receive a prepaid mailer to return the bottle. Upon receipt of the returned bottle, consumers will be mailed a full refund plus a $25 H&M gift card.

    Consumers may contact H&M toll-free at (855) 466-7467 daily from 7 a.m. to 12 midnight CT.

    H & M Hennes & Mauritz, L.P., New York, N.Y., is re-announcing the recall of its children’s water bottles. Some 2,900 bottles were contained in the origina...
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    LL Bakery recalls bread, bakery products

    The product label fails to declare milk, a known allergen

    LL Bakery of Torrance, Calif., is recalling all White Farm Enriched White Bread, Butter Farm Enriched White Bread, and Italian Cream Danish.

    The product labels fail to declare the allergen milk in the whey powder listed in their ingredient statements. People with an allergy or severe sensitivity to milk run the risk of a life threatening allergic reaction.

    LL Bakery has segregated its entire inventory of the effected products and is notifying and warning consumers and customers not to consume them.

    • White Farm Enriched White Bread is a 16 oz. loaf with square shaped slices. The label is white with blue and green lettering, and red design accents. The LL Bakery Logo is on the bottom left corner.
    • Butter Farm Enriched White Bread is a 16 oz. loaf with square shaped slices. The label is white with brown and green lettering, and red design accents. The LL Bakery Logo is on the bottom left corner.
    • Italian Cream Danish pastry is braided and has yellow creamy swirls and sliced almonds. The label is white with black lettering and a tan colored border. The LL Bakery Logo is on the bottom left corner.

    Consumers in possession of these products should not eat them; instead return them to the place of purchase.

    Consumers may call Kiyo Kamiyama at 310-516-1918 for further information.

    LL Bakery of Torrance, Calif., is recalling all White Farm Enriched White Bread, Butter Farm Enriched White Bread, and Italian Cream Danish. The product l...
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    Avon recalls microwave popcorn maker

    Overheated popcorn can pose a fire or burn hazard

    Avon Products of New York, N.Y., is recalling about 54,700 microwave popcorn makers

    When cooked too long, the popcorn can overheat in this popcorn maker and ignite, posing a fire or burn hazard to consumers. The company has received 20 reports of the popcorn makers overheating, including two incidents involving fires that resulted in damage to microwave ovens. No injuries have been reported.

    This recall involves Avon’s Microwave Popcorn Maker sold in the U.S. with item number 474-105 in Avon’s brochures and website. The recalled plastic popcorn maker consists of a clear tub and a yellow vented lid. The tub is 6 inches high and measures 7.5 inches in diameter and has three feet at the base. “DO NOT REMOVE WITH BARE HANDS. HOLD UNIT WITH GLOVES” is molded into the plastic of the lid and “USE IN MICROWAVE OVEN ONLY” is molded into the underside of the bowl. “Made in Taiwan” is printed on an adhesive label located on the underside of the bowl.

    The popcorn maker, manufactured in Taiwan, was sold through independent Avon sales representatives and online from October 2012, through February 2013, for about $13.

    Consumers should stop using the popcorn maker immediately and contact Avon to receive a copy of the updated instructions on how to use the microwave popcorn maker safely. The new instructions can also be obtained from independent Avon representatives and on Avon’s website.

    Consumers may contact Avon Products at (800) 367-2866 from 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET Monday through Friday.

    Avon Products of New York, N.Y., is recalling about 54,700 microwave popcorn makers When cooked too long, the popcorn can overheat in this popcorn maker a...
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      Repeat offenders drive food recalls in 2013

      Analysis finds 28% of recalls come from foreign objects

      Crime statistics are often driven by repeat offenders and it turns out the same is true of food recalls. Nearly three out of four food recalls in the first quarter of the year came from companies that had issued two or more recalls during the period.

      The ExpertRECALL Index released today found that more than 73% of recalls documented by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) involved companies with two or more recalls. A total of 133 food companies instituted recalls during this period, affecting 9.7 million units of products such as bread and flour products, bagged fruits and vegetables, and frozen entrees.

      Many times, the multiple recalls occur because of an issue with an ingredient that is used in more than one product.

      “It is not unusual for companies to face more than one recall at a time, driven largely by the fact that ingredients are used in more than one product,” said Mike Rozembajgier, Vice President of Stericycle ExpertRECALL. “However, the ongoing trend of multiple product recalls can complicate the logistics of a recall, making it harder for companies to communicate to consumers and maintain trust in their brand.”

      USDA figures added 

      For the first time since its inception, the Index includes data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), which involve recalls of meat, poultry and egg products.

      An analysis of data from the first quarter found that extraneous material was the single largest cause of USDA-requested recalls this quarter, accounting for more than one in four recalls (28 percent). Of these recalls, more than half were the result of traces of plastic found in products. 

      Undeclared allergens were the second most frequent cause of recalls reported by the USDA, with a total of five product recalls this quarter.

      A recent CDC report on the heightened levels of food allergies in children illustrates how important managing food ingredients and food labeling is. It also points to the need for companies to have a clear and well-rehearsed recall plan ready when issues arise.

      Multiple recalls was also a trend echoed in the medical device industry, as close to 40% of companies named in FDA Enforcement reports faced two or more recalls in the second quarter.

      The pharmaceutical industry experienced 107 drug and pharmaceutical recalls in the first quarter, an increase of 32% from the previous quarter. Compounding pharmacies continue to show frequent recall activity, with one pharmacy issuing 13 individual events.

      Crime statisitcs are often driven by repeat offenders and it turns out the same is true of food recalls. Nearly three out of four food recalls in the first...
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      Toyota recalling FJ Cruisers

      Upper beam headlamps are too bright

      Toyota is recalling about 11,489 model year 2007-2013 FJ Cruiser vehicles manufactured January 25, 2006 through February 23, 2013 and equipped with a Toyota Auxiliary Driving Lamp Kits mounted to the front bumper.

      These lamp assemblies include 55 watt bulbs and due to this wattage, the combination of the upper beam headlamps plus the auxiliary lamps are too bright and exceed the maximum light output allowed for an upper beam headlamp. Excessively bright lamps may temporarily blind oncoming drivers, increasing the risk of a crash.

      Toyota will notify owners, and dealers will replace the 55 watt bulbs with 35 watt bulbs, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin in late May 2013.

      Owners may contact Toyota at 1-800-331-4331.

      Toyota is recalling about 11,489 model year 2007-2013 FJ Cruiser vehicles manufactured January 25, 2006 through February 23, 2013 and equipped with a Toyot...
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