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Troy-Bilt, Craftsman Chain Saws Recalled

Troy-Bilt, Craftsman Chain Saws Recalled...

November 29, 2006
MTD Southwest Inc. is recalling about 76,000 Troy-Bilt and Craftsman brand gasoline chain saws. The chain saw's plastic front handle can break during operation. If this occurs, the saw would be difficult to control, posing a risk of lacerations.

MTD has received two reports of consumers losing control of the saw when the handles broke during use. One consumer reported bruising to his elbow and the other received burns to his fingers after they came in contact with the muffler after the handle broke.

These Troy-Bilt and Craftsman brand chain saws are powered by a two-cycle gasoline engine ranging in size from 46cc to 55cc. They are equipped with either an 18-inch or 20-inch bar. There are four Troy-Bilt models affected: 41AY00AR966, 41AY60AR766, 41AY90AR766 and 41AY08AR966. There is one Craftsman "Incredi-Pull" model affected: a 55cc two-cycle gasoline engine with an 18-inch bar and model number 316.350840. The model number of the chain saw is located on the engine casing.

The Troy-Bilt brand chain saws were sold at independent retailers, home improvement and hardware stores nationwide from January 2004 through June 2006 for between $200 and $250. The Craftsman brand chain saws were sold at Sears and Kmart stores nationwide from January 2004 through June 2006 for between $190 and $230.

Consumers should stop using these chain saws immediately, and contact MTD to receive a free service kit with a replacement handle and installation instructions. Sears customers will be mailed a free service kit with a replacement handle and installation instructions.

Consumer Contact: For more information, contact MTD toll-free at (888) 848-6038 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or log onto the company's Web site at www.troybilt.com. Sears customers should call Sears at (800) 659-7026 between 7 a.m. and 9 p.m. CT Monday through Saturday.

The recall is being conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

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Feds Order Recall to Fix Faulty Volvo Speed Controls; Chrysler Pacifica Recalled for Power Train Problem

Chrysler Pacifica Recalled for Power Train Problem

Feds Order Recall to Fix Faulty Volvo Speed Controls; Chrysler Pacifica Recalled for Power Train Problem...

November 24, 2006
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has issued a recall of 360,000 Volvos because the vehicle speed control systems can cause the engine to lose power without warning.

Volvo reports a problem inside the electronic throttle control module in cars built between 1999 and 2002 which could cause the vehicle to shift into a "limp home" mode limiting the maximum speed to roughly 15 miles per hour.

The recall applies to Volvo C70 and V70 models built between 1999 and 2002, S60 models built between 2001 and 2002, and S70 and V70X models built between 1999 and 2000.

Volvo has already repaired the speed control problem in about 165,000 vehicles of the recall total after sending out notices to owners in March.

NHTSA informed Volvo that the agency was making the recall mandatory earlier this month. Volvo owners who bring their cars to dealerships will have new software reinstalled for the throttle control unit.

The "limp home" setting is a safety feature in Volvo cars intended to prevent unintended acceleration in case of a throttle malfunction.

Volvo is owned by the Ford Motor Co.

Pacifica Recall

NHTSA also ordered DaimlerChrysler's Chrysler Group to recall 128,000 Pacifica sport utility vehicles because of a problem with the software governing the fuel pump and power train control.

NHTSA reports the defect could cause the engine to stall in some cases. The recall applies to Pacifica models built between 2005 and 2006.

Chrysler dealers will reprogram the power train controls and replace the fuel pump on certain cars as part of the recall.

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Salmonella Scare Prompts Hershey's Recall In Canada

Salmonella Scare Prompts Hershey's Recall In Canada...

November 13, 2006
U.S. chocolate maker Hershey, Inc. is recalling a number of candy products made at one of its Canadian plants because one or more of its ingredients may be tainted with Salmonella bacteria. Candy produced in the U.S. is not affected.

The company, in cooperation with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, announced the voluntary recall of a limited number of products produced at its Smiths Falls plant between October 15 and November 10, 2006.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with consumption of these items. No Halloween or Christmas items are included in the recall.

"Product quality and safety are top priorities at Hershey," said Eric Lent, General Manager, Canada. "We are working in close cooperation with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency to quickly retrieve the product in question from our customers and to ensure that consumers who may have purchased this product are aware of the potential health concern."

The action includes the recall of 25 popular chocolates, including Oh Henry! and Reese's Peanut Butter Cups. The Pennsylvania-based company says a chocolate ingredient tested positive for salmonella during routine quality inspections on late last week. The Ontario production plant, which employs 500 people, was immediately closed and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency notified.

A company spokeswoman said tests confirmed the presence of the bacteria, but she would not say what ingredient was responsible for the suspected contamination. She said most of the affected chocolate was still in the factory and that product that had been released to customers was being recalled.

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