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White Industries Air Conditioners Recalled

White Industries Air Conditioners Recalled...

WASHINGTON, March 28, 2001 -- White Consolidated Industries is voluntarily recalling about 17,000 air conditioners. The recalled models can short circuit posing a risk of fires, and shock and burn injuries.

White Consolidated Industries Inc. has received one report of a fire because of a short circuit resulting in $14,000 in damage. No injuries have been reported.

The recall is being conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

These are 240 volt air conditioners installed through the wall. They were sold under the following brands and model numbers: Frigidaire FAH096J2T1; White-Westinghouse WAH09EH2T1 and WAH096H2T1; Kenmore 253.79093990 and 253.70093000. The brand name is written on the front of the air conditioner under the control dial. The model number is written on a label inside the air conditioner, which can be viewed by lifting the filter in the front of the unit and reading the number through the slats.

Department, appliance, home and hardware stores, and independent contractors sold these air conditioners nationwide from November 1998 through November 2000 for about $300.

Consumers should stop using these units, and contact the company toll- free at (866) 897-5612 anytime to arrange for a free repair.

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Disney Store Recalling Little Ariel Dresses

Fabric used in these costumes can ignite readily and presents a serious risk of burn injuries in violation of the Federal Flammable Fabrics Act....

WASHINGTON, April 19, 2001 -- The Disney Store is voluntarily recalling about 54,000 Princess Ariel (The Little Mermaid) costumes. Fabric used in these costumes can ignite readily and presents a serious risk of burn injuries in violation of the Federal Flammable Fabrics Act.

CPSC and Disney are aware of two reports of costumes igniting, resulting in one burn injury to a 4-year-old girl.

The recall is being conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

The Princess Ariel costume has a green skirt with two layers of netting on top and a sequined purple metallic bodice with a picture of Ariel. The costumes were sold in youth sizes 2-4, 4-6X and 8-10. The neckline labels read "The Disney Store."

The Disney Store sold the costumes for Halloween from July 2000 through October 2000. The Disney Store catalog and DisneyStore.com sold the costumes from July 2000 through January 2001. The costumes sold for about $29.

Consumers should stop wearing these costumes immediately, and return them to any Disney Store or to the Disney Store catalog for a refund and a $10 gift certificate. For more information, call Disney at (800) 328-5902 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, or e-mail the company at disneystore.costume@disneyonline.com.

The recall does not include Princess Ariel costumes sold before July 2000. The earlier Ariel costume was a mermaid fin-like costume with a knee-length, sequined skirt.


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Tips for Preventing Dryer Fires

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that in 1997, there were an estimated 16,700 fires, 30 deaths and 430 injuries associated with clothe...

WASHINGTON, March 5, 2001 -- The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that in 1997, there were an estimated 16,700 fires, 30 deaths and 430 injuries associated with clothes dryers. Some of these fires can occur when lint builds up in the filter or in the exhaust duct. Under certain conditions, when lint blocks the flow of air, excessive heat build-up can cause a fire in some dryers.

To prevent fires:
  • Clean the lint filter regularly and make sure the dryer is operating properly. Clean the filter after each load of clothes. While the dryer is operating, check the outside exhaust to make sure exhaust air is escaping normally. If it is not, turn the dryer off and look inside both ends of the duct for lint. Remove any lint found there. If there are signs that the dryer is hotter than normal, this may be a sign that the dryer's temperature control thermostat needs servicing.

  • If clothing is still damp at the end of a normal cycle or requires longer dryer times, this may be a sign that the exhaust or ling screen is blocked.

  • Check the exhaust duct more often if you have a plastic, flexible duct. This type of duct is more apt to trap lint than ducting without ridges. Inspect the duct for kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the airflow.

  • Closely follow manufacturers' instructions for new installations. Most manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or flexible metal duct to provide a minimum restriction of airflow. If metal duct is not available at the retailer where the dryer was purchased, check other locations, such as hardware or builder supply stores. If you are having the dryer installed, insist upon metal duct unless the installer has verified that the manufacturer permits the use of plastic duct.
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