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Gas prices are rising rapidly in some areas of the country

Wall Street traders are bidding up the price of oil, hoping for an end to the pandemic

It’s a contradiction. Gasoline demand is actually going down because of the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Yet the price of gasoline is rapidly snapping back to pre-pandemic levels.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $2.37 a gallon, seven cents higher than last Friday. It’s now only 20 cents a gallon less than at this time in 2020.

The average price of premium gas is $2.95 a gallon, seven cents more than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.61 a gallon, three cents higher than a week ago.

In the background, Wall Street traders have bid up the price of oil beyond $50 a barrel. While it’s true the Saudis have agreed to cut production, the big story is the potential end to the pandemic. The thinking is, once enough people are inoculated things will start getting back to normal and demand will rise.

So far, that bet hasn’t panned out. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports demand last week fell to its lowest level since May.

“Gas prices are rising as supply tightens and crude oil gets more expensive. Decreasing demand is outweighed by these other factors at the moment,” said Jeanette Casselano McGee, a AAA spokesperson. “Last week crude oil pushed to the highest price since before the pandemic. If crude prices remain high, Americans can expect to pay more at the pump this month.” 

Some states saw bigger increases than others. Texas saw its statewide average jump 12 cents a gallon in the last week. The average price in Missouri is up 10 cents a gallon. As of this week, no state has an average price below $2 a gallon.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.31)

  • Hawaii ($3.30)

  • Washington ($2.79)

  • Nevada ($2.68)

  • Oregon ($2.66)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.66)

  • Alaska ($2.57)

  • Illinois ($2.51)

  • New Jersey ($2.51)

  • New York ($2.44)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.05)

  • Louisiana ($2.08)

  • Missouri ($2.09)

  • Oklahoma ($2.09)

  • Texas ($2.10)

  • Arkansas ($2.12)

  • Alabama ($2.14)

  • South Carolina ($2.14)

  • Kansas ($2.16)

  • Tennessee ($2.18)

It’s a contradiction. Gasoline demand is actually going down because of the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Yet the price of gasoline is rapidly s...
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Gas prices show a slight uptick over the last week

Prices begin 2021 at 30 cents a gallon less than last year

Gasoline prices remained fairly stable during the end-of-the-year holidays as oil prices found a sweet spot and demand continued to fall.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.30 a gallon, up five cents in the last week but 30 cents lower than at this time a year ago.

The average price of premium gas is $2.89 a gallon, four cents higher than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.58 a gallon, two cents more than last week.

Oil prices ticked slightly higher this week on rising optimism that the end of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is in sight. U.S. gasoline demand, as recorded by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), was at the lowest level for the last week of December since 1998 – at 8.1 million barrels a day.

“Holiday road travel was down at least 25 percent,” said Jeanette Casselano McGee, AAA spokesperson. “With fewer people on the road, the majority of states saw little change at the pump from the last week of 2020 to the first few days of 2021.”

Casselano says where gas prices go from here will largely depend on the price of crude oil and when demand for fuel begins to pick up again. She said AAA expects that as the vaccine becomes more widely available and states loosen travel restrictions, Americans will begin to see prices follow normal season patterns.

For all of 2020, AAA says the national average price of regular was $2.17 a gallon, the lowest since 2016.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.29)

  • California ($3.26)

  • Washington ($2.76)

  • Nevada ($2.63)

  • Oregon ($2.62)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.59)

  • Alaska ($2.52)

  • Illinois ($2.43)

  • New York ($2.35)

  • New Jersey ($2.22)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.96)

  • Texas ($1.98)

  • Missouri ($1.99)

  • Louisiana ($1.99)

  • Oklahoma ($2.01)

  • Arkansas ($2.02)

  • Kansas ($2.04)

  • Alabama ($2.05)

  • Tennessee ($2.09)

  • South Carolina ($2.07)

Gasoline prices remained fairly stable during the end-of-the-year holidays as oil prices found a sweet spot and demand continued to fall.The AAA Fuel G...
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Gas prices jumped five cents a gallon in the last week

Demand is starting to increase and oil prices are rising

Prices at the pump have made their largest one-week advance since before the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic drastically reduced demand.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.21 a gallon, five cents a gallon more than last Friday. The price has risen eight cents over the last four weeks. The average price of premium gas is $2.81 a gallon, also five cents higher than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.50, an increase of four cents a gallon over the last week.

Though gasoline demand has been rising lately, the one-week jump in prices may have more to do with the price of crude oil, which has been rising on speculation that the economy will bounce back once a vaccine is widespread. 

West Texas Intermediate (WTI) is approaching the $50 per barrel mark, a price it hasn’t seen since the beginning of the pandemic. Although energy demand is rising slightly, it is nowhere near what it was before the virus shut down much of the world economy.

In the last week, Western states that have the nation’s highest gas prices saw very little price movement. The price hike was largely driven by Southeastern states, where prices are lowest. Many of these states saw their statewide average rise by five cents a gallon.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.27)

  • California ($3.18)

  • Washington ($2.75)

  • Oregon ($2.58)

  • Nevada ($2.57)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.52)

  • Alaska ($2.50)

  • Maryland ($2.35)

  • New Jersey ($2.32)

  • Idaho ($2.24)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.87)

  • Missouri ($1.89)

  • Louisiana ($1.91)

  • Texas ($1.91)

  • Oklahoma ($1.92)

  • Arkansas ($1.92)

  • Alabama ($1.95)

  • Tennessee ($1.95)

  • South Carolina ($1.97)

  • Kansas ($1.99)

Prices at the pump have made their largest one-week advance since before the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic drastically reduced demand.The AAA Fuel Ga...
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Gas prices stabilize as COVID-19 cases rise

Sixteen states still have average prices below $2 a gallon

The rise in oil prices that sent gas prices higher two weeks ago was offset this week by a continued drop in demand. More cars remained parked as health officials urged Americans to spend more time at home to stem the deadly rise in coronavirus (COVID-19) cases.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows that the national average price of regular gas is $2.15 a gallon, a penny more than last Friday. Prices are four cents higher than a month ago. The average price of premium gas is $2.77 a gallon, the same as last week. The average price of diesel fuel rose two cents a gallon to $2.45 a gallon.

Oil prices have begun to rise in recent weeks in response to optimism about vaccines that could end the pandemic by mid-2021. But the lack of demand has kept prices at the pump in check. At the beginning of the week, AAA reported that gasoline demand was down 8 million barrels a day. GasBuddy reported that demand was slightly higher than the week before, but it’s running 12 percent below 2019.

Though prices have risen over the last four weeks, 16 states still have average prices below $2 a gallon. One year ago, the average price was 42 cents a gallon higher than today.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.28)

  • California ($3.18)

  • Washington ($2.75)

  • Oregon ($2.58)

  • Nevada ($2.58)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.53)

  • Alaska ($2.50)

  • Maryland ($2.34)

  • New Jersey ($2.28)

  • Idaho ($2.26)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.84)

  • Mississippi ($1.84)

  • Texas ($1.85)

  • Oklahoma ($1.87)

  • Louisiana ($1.88)

  • Arkansas ($1.90)

  • Alabama ($1.91)

  • Tennessee ($1.91)

  • South Carolina ($1.92)

  • Wisconsin ($1.94)

The rise in oil prices that sent gas prices higher two weeks ago was offset this week by a continued drop in demand. More cars remained parked as health of...
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Gas prices are moving higher again

The price hike coincided with the Thanksgiving holiday

After weeks of stable prices at the gas pump, gasoline is getting more expensive heading into the end of the year. The increase began as Americans -- disregarding advice from health experts -- hit the road over the Thanksgiving holiday.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.16 a gallon, five cents higher than a week ago. The average price has increased four cents a gallon over the last month.

The average price of premium gas is $2.77, four cents higher than seven days ago. The average price of diesel fuel is up two cents in the last week to $2.43 a gallon.

Analysts say the unpredicted rise in fuel prices has a lot to do with optimism about the COVID-19 vaccines. They say domestic oil prices are rising for the same reason beaten-down stocks are going up each day on Wall Street -- the belief that the end of the pandemic is in sight.

There were also more cars on the road during Thanksgiving week, which increased demand for fuel. But at the beginning of the week, AAA reported demand was lagging supplies and was calling for lower fuel prices in the days ahead.

In the last week, the biggest increase in gasoline prices occurred in states with the lowest average prices. The average price in Missouri, the cheapest state in the nation, rose five cents a gallon in the last week.

Prices were flat or dipped slightly in most of the states where prices are highest. Pennsylvania was an exception, as the average price jumped nine cents a gallon during the week.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.27)

  • California ($3.18)

  • Washington ($2.76)

  • Oregon ($2.59)

  • Nevada ($2.58)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.54)

  • Alaska ($2.49)

  • Maryland ($2.33)

  • Idaho ($2.29)

  • New Jersey ($2.28)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.81)

  • Mississippi ($1.83)

  • Texas ($1.85)

  • Oklahoma ($1.86)

  • Arkansas ($1.86)

  • Louisiana ($1.87)

  • Alabama ($1.89)

  • Tennessee ($1.90)

  • Kansas ($1.91)

  • Wisconsin ($1.91)

After weeks of stable prices at the gas pump, gasoline is getting more expensive heading into the end of the year. The increase began as Americans -- disre...
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Gas prices remain stable in the face of rising demand

A fast-spreading virus is failing to keep people out of their cars

The price of gasoline remained stable during the week as the number of coronavirus (COVID-19) cases grew dramatically across the country. Despite the spread of the virus, fuel demand continued to rise.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.11 a gallon, two cents less than last Friday. The price is down five cents over the last four weeks.

The average price of premium gas is $2.73, one cent less than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.39, two cents less than seven days ago.

AAA suggests the slight increase in price at the pump in a handful of states is a reaction to government data showing demand is rising, when analysts predicted it would fall because of the spread of the virus. Several states in the last week took steps to curb activity, including placing restrictions on restaurants and other businesses.

“Following a jump in demand, we’ve seen a number of state gas price averages increase on the week. However, the majority of these increases were just a few pennies,” said Jeanette Casselano McGee, a AAA spokesperson. “With many states seeing rising COVID-19 case numbers and a number of officials warning against holiday travel, demand is likely to see a dip in coming weeks.”

But despite suggestions that people stay home on Thanksgiving -- the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a stern request Thursday -- surveys have shown as much as half the country plans to go somewhere on the holiday, mostly by car. Rising demand could keep upward pressure on prices, at least for a while.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.25)

  • California ($3.17)

  • Washington ($2.76)

  • Nevada ($2.59)

  • Oregon ($2.59)

  • Alaska ($2.50)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.46)

  • Utah ($2.30)

  • Idaho ($2.30)

  • Arizona ($2.22)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.77)

  • Mississippi ($1.80)

  • Texas ($1.80)

  • Oklahoma ($1.81)

  • Arkansas ($1.83)

  • Louisiana ($1.84)

  • Alabama ($1.86)

  • Tennessee ($1.86)

  • Kansas ($1.88)

  • South Carolina ($1.88)

The price of gasoline remained stable during the week as the number of coronavirus (COVID-19) cases grew dramatically across the country. Despite the sprea...
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Gas prices rise slightly as fuel demand rises

Most states saw little price movement over the last week

Gasoline prices were mostly flat for most of the week in most states, but an increase in demand at midweek is pushing prices at the pump slightly higher.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows that the national average price of regular gas is $2.13 a gallon, two cents more than last Friday. But in the last four weeks, the average price has dropped five cents. The average price of premium gas is $2.74 a gallon, also a penny higher on the week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.38 a gallon, up from $2.36 last week.

Across the nation, prices were fairly stable over the last week, rising or falling by a penny a gallon in most states. South Carolina, where the price rose six cents a gallon, and Pennsylvania, which experienced a three cents a gallon increase, were outliers.

Fuel demand has been uneven lately, but it rose at midweek. Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, tweeted that demand on Wednesday was up 2.6 percent, according to Pay with GasBuddy data.

Demand could creep higher with the Thanksgiving holiday coming up. Despite health officials’ pleas to the public not to gather with family and friends and risk the spread of the coronavirus, a Cars.com survey suggests that many people will, in fact, travel over the holiday.

The survey found that 47 percent of Americans said they plan to travel during the Thanksgiving holiday, the overwhelming majority by car. A year ago, 68 percent of Americans said they planned to hit the road.

Despite the predicted uptick in travel over the holiday period, AAA still expects demand to weaken as we reach the end of the year. The spike in coronavirus (COVID-19) cases is causing some states to place new restrictions on travel.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.26)

  • California ($3.17)

  • Washington ($2.77)

  • Nevada ($2.59)

  • Oregon ($2.56)

  • Alaska ($2.50)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.47)

  • Utah ($2.32)

  • Idaho ($2.30)

  • Illinois ($2.24)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.77)

  • Mississippi ($1.80)

  • Texas ($1.81)

  • Oklahoma ($1.81)

  • Arkansas ($1.83)

  • Louisiana ($1.85)

  • Alabama ($1.86)

  • Tennessee ($1.87)

  • Kansas ($1.88)

  • South Carolina ($1.88)

Gasoline prices were mostly flat for most of the week in most states, but an increase in demand at midweek is pushing prices at the pump slightly higher....
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The decline in gas prices gains momentum

A survey finds the average price has declined seven cents a gallon in the last month

Low and stable gasoline prices have become a “new normal,” much better for consumers than the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic’s new normal of masks, social distancing, and sporting events without fans.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.11 a gallon, down another three cents a gallon in the last seven days. It’s down seven cents in the last four weeks.

The average price of premium gas $2.73 a gallon, three cents lower than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.36 a gallon, a penny less than last week.

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports demand for gasoline declined for another week as consumers are driving less during the pandemic. AAA says that trend should keep prices at the pump slowly falling for the rest of the year.

In the last week, the average gas price is six cents lower in Michigan, five cents lower in Kentucky and Texas, and four cents lower in South Carolina.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.26)

  • California ($3.17)

  • Washington ($2.75)

  • Nevada ($2.60)

  • Oregon ($2.56)

  • Alaska ($2.50)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.44)

  • Utah ($2.34)

  • Idaho ($2.31)

  • Illinois ($2.23)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.78)

  • Mississippi ($1.79)

  • Texas ($1.79)

  • Oklahoma ($1.81)

  • South Carolina ($1.82)

  • Arkansas ($1.82)

  • Louisiana ($1.84)

  • Alabama ($1.85)

  • Tennessee ($1.86)

  • Kansas ($1.89)

Low and stable gasoline prices have become a “new normal,” much better for consumers than the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic’s new normal of masks, social...
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Gas prices fall again this week

Consumers are saving 46 cents a gallon over last year

A surge in the third-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) did nothing to raise gasoline prices this week. The government reports GDP increased 31 percent, but the average gas price went down again.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.14 a gallon, two cents lower than last Friday. Prices are still relatively stable, down four cents a gallon in the last month.

The average price of premium gas fell by a penny in the last week to $2.76 a gallon. The average price of diesel fuel is the same as last week -- $2.37 a gallon.

Gasoline demand continues to flatline or dip lower as consumers, for the most part, continue to stay close to home. AAA reports demand in October has been about 14 percent less than last October.

“The U.S. has a very healthy level of gasoline stocks due to lower demand and that is keeping gas prices low,” said Jeanette Casselano McGee, AAA spokesperson. “The majority of states have cheaper gas prices compared to last month, many paying three to eight cents less. That downward trend at the pump is likely to continue.” 

Demand, in fact, has fallen as the number of coronavirus (COVID-19) cases has spiked. Prices at the pump have fallen with lower demand.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.26)

  • California ($3.18)

  • Washington ($2.76)

  • Nevada ($2.61)

  • Oregon ($2.57)

  • Alaska ($2.50)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.46)

  • Utah ($2.36)

  • Idaho ($2.34)

  • Illinois ($2.25)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.81)

  • Mississippi ($1.82)

  • Oklahoma ($1.83)

  • Texas ($1.84)

  • Arkansas ($1.85)

  • Louisiana ($1.87)

  • South Carolina ($1.87)

  • Alabama ($1.88)

  • Tennessee ($1.89)

  • Kansas ($1.92)

A surge in the third-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) did nothing to raise gasoline prices this week. The government reports GDP increased 31 percent,...
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It’s been years since gas prices have been this stable

The national average price has fluctuated just two cents in the last month

Motorists are still driving less during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, so demand for gasoline continues to fall. That means there’s little to push up prices at the pump.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.16 a gallon, a penny less than last Friday. It’s two cents lower than it was a month ago.

The average price of premium gas is $2.77 a gallon, two cents less than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.37 a gallon, down from $2.38 last week.

This week’s Petroleum Industry Report from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) shows U.S. gasoline supplies rose by 1.9 million barrels for the week to October 16. Gasoline production last week averaged 8.9 million barrels a day, compared with 9.2 million barrels a day a week earlier.

Since they were turning out less gasoline, U.S. oil refineries ran this week at only 72.9 percent of capacity. During normal time, refineries usually operate at 93 percent of capacity.

With supplies rising and demand falling, prices have remained stable across much of the nation. Kentucky and Washington DC saw the biggest fluctuations during the week. The gas average price is five cents a gallon higher in Kentucky but five cents a gallon less in the nation’s capital.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.28)

  • California ($3.19)

  • Washington ($2.77)

  • Nevada ($2.61)

  • Oregon ($2.58)

  • Alaska ($2.51)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.47)

  • Utah ($2.38)

  • Idaho ($2.35)

  • Illinois ($2.27)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.84)

  • Texas ($1.86)

  • Missouri ($1.84)

  • Arkansas ($1.87)

  • Oklahoma ($1.86)

  • Alabama ($1.90)

  • Louisiana ($1.89)

  • South Carolina ($1.90)

  • Tennessee ($1.92)

  • Kansas ($1.93)

Motorists are still driving less during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, so demand for gasoline continues to fall. That means there’s little to push up...
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Gas prices drift lower on supply build

Refinery output continues to exceed demand

The price of gas fell slightly this week as demand was overshadowed by growing fuel supplies.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.17 a gallon, a penny less than last week and two cents less than two weeks ago.

The average price of premium gas is $2.79 a gallon, the same as last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is also the same as a week ago, $2.38 a gallon.

Hurricane Delta, the second Gulf Coast hurricane in a month, made landfall in Southwest Louisiana, but the disruption to refinery operations was minimal. Most facilities were back on line within hours.

The Colonial Pipeline Line 1, the main gas line, was down temporarily over the weekend due to loss of power, which was back in service by Monday morning. Not only did gas prices not rise, they actually went down.

“In a typical year, a hurricane season like we’ve experienced this year would have caused gas prices to spike, but 2020 is not a typical year,” said Jeanette Casselano McGee, AAA spokesperson. “Low U.S. gasoline demand has helped contain any impact to gas prices locally and regionally throughout this hurricane season.”

There’s evidence that these low and stable gas prices may be encouraging more driving. Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, reported that Pay with GasBuddy data showed gasoline demand on Wednesday rose 1.8 percent above the previous Wednesday. But demand for gas was down 0.9 percent from last week.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.26)

  • California ($3.20)

  • Washington ($2.78)

  • Nevada ($2.63)

  • Oregon ($2.59)

  • Alaska ($2.49)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.48)

  • Utah ($2.40)

  • Idaho ($2.36)

  • Illinois ($2.26)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.85)

  • Texas ($1.86)

  • Missouri ($1.86)

  • Arkansas ($1.88)

  • Oklahoma ($1.88)

  • Alabama ($1.90)

  • Louisiana ($1.91)

  • South Carolina ($1.92)

  • Tennessee ($1.94)

  • Kansas ($1.95)

The price of gas fell slightly this week as demand was overshadowed by growing fuel supplies.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price...
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Gas prices hold steady but demand is picking up

The average price at the pump is 46 cents lower than last year

Motorists drove more this week, but it had no effect on prices in most states. The price at the pump has been stable since early July.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.18 a gallon, a penny less than last Friday. That’s three cents less than a month ago.

The average price of premium gas is $2.79 a gallon, also one cent less than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.38 a gallon, which is also a penny less than a week ago.

AAA says $2.18 a gallon is the cheapest price of gasoline at the beginning of October since 2016. That’s four cents cheaper than the start of September, with prices holding steady on demand of 8.5 million barrels a day.

“Demand is likely to see some declines in the weeks ahead as drivers traditionally take fewer road trips in the fall,” said Jeanette Casselano McGee, AAA’s spokesperson. “That will mean gas prices are likely to push cheaper throughout the month.”

Gas prices have been remarkably stable over the last couple of weeks, even with hurricanes pounding the Gulf Coast. AAA reports that in the last week, 41 state gas price averages fluctuated by no more than two cents a gallon. Most only saw a penny increase or decrease.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.24)

  • California ($3.20)

  • Washington ($2.79)

  • Nevada ($2.64)

  • Oregon ($2.61)

  • Alaska ($2.51)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.48)

  • Utah ($2.40)

  • Idaho ($2.38)

  • Illinois ($2.29)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.85)

  • Texas ($1.86)

  • Arkansas ($1.88)

  • Louisiana ($1.91)

  • Missouri ($1.87)

  • Alabama ($1.91)

  • Oklahoma ($1.88)

  • South Carolina ($1.92)

  • Tennessee ($1.93)

  • Kansas ($1.95)

Motorists drove more this week, but it had no effect on prices in most states. The price at the pump has been stable since early July.The AAA Fuel Gaug...
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Gas prices stay in neutral despite a slight increase in demand

Demand remains far below pre-pandemic levels

For yet another week, consumers enjoyed stable prices at the pump as even a slight increase in demand couldn’t push gas prices higher.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.19 a gallon, about the same as last Friday. It’s four cents less than a month ago.

The average price of premium gas is $2.80 a gallon, also the same as last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.39 a gallon, a penny less than last week. 

Prices have been stable largely because supply and demand have balanced one another out. In a Thursday tweet, Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, noted that demand rose sharply at mid-week, suggesting that consumers have begun to drive more than in recent weeks.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported fuel demand increased slightly from the previous week but remains more than 800,000 barrels a day less than during this same week in 2019.

“Low demand, even as gasoline stocks decline, has helped pump prices decline or hold steady on the week,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “That is likely to continue into the fall as the season sees fewer road trips, especially amid the pandemic.” 

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.23)

  • California ($3.21)

  • Washington ($2.80)

  • Nevada ($2.64)

  • Oregon ($2.62)

  • Alaska ($2.51)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.49)

  • Utah ($2.41)

  • Idaho ($2.41)

  • Illinois ($2.31)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.84)

  • Texas ($1.86)

  • Arkansas ($1.88)

  • Louisiana ($1.89)

  • Missouri ($1.88)

  • Alabama ($1.90)

  • Oklahoma ($1.89)

  • South Carolina ($1.92)

  • Tennessee ($1.94)

  • Kansas ($1.96)

For yet another week, consumers enjoyed stable prices at the pump as even a slight increase in demand couldn’t push gas prices higher.The AAA Fuel Gaug...
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Gas prices remarkably stable over the last week

Even Gulf Coast storms have failed to have any impact on prices at the pump

Americans simply aren’t driving as much as they used to, and entering the fall months when refineries are switching over to winter gasoline blends, gas prices have continued to drift lower in many states.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.19 a gallon, a penny more than last week but a penny less than two weeks ago. The price is still 47 cents a gallon less than this time last year.

The average price of premium gas is $2.80 a gallon up from $2.79 last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.40 a gallon, the same as a week ago.

Gasoline demand remains seasonally low. In the last week, it totaled 8.39 million barrels a day, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). That’s nearly a half-million barrels a day less than what consumers were using a year ago.

Even the spate of Gulf Coast storms hasn’t done much to impact prices at the pump. Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, tweeted at midweek that CITGO's Lake Charles, La., refinery is not expected to return to full operation until mid to late October.

“They're in no rush with weak demand,” he wrote.

Prices were mostly stable across the country. Delaware and Florida saw the average pump price fall three cents a gallon while prices rose three cents a gallon in Illinois.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.24)

  • California ($3.22)

  • Washington ($2.81)

  • Nevada ($2.65)

  • Oregon ($2.63)

  • Alaska ($2.53)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.50)

  • Utah ($2.43)

  • Idaho ($2.43)

  • Illinois ($2.33)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.84)

  • Texas ($1.87)

  • Arkansas ($1.88)

  • Louisiana ($1.88)

  • Missouri ($1.88)

  • Alabama ($1.90)

  • Oklahoma ($1.90)

  • South Carolina ($1.94)

  • Tennessee ($1.93)

  • Kansas ($1.97)

Americans simply aren’t driving as much as they used to, and entering the fall months when refineries are switching over to winter gasoline blends, gas pri...
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Falling demand is keeping gas prices in check

Hurricane Sally had little effect on prices at the pump this week

Motorists seem to have parked their cars now that the summer driving season is over. Even a hurricane slamming the Gulf Coast failed to overcome a big drop in fuel demand.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.18 a gallon, two cents less than last Friday. The average price of premium is $2.79 gallon -- also two cents less than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.40, down from $2.42 last week.

Hurricane Sally stormed ashore from the Gulf of Mexico, forcing a shutdown of oil rigs in the region early in the week. But there was apparently little damage and operations resumed by Thursday.

Crews returned to at least 30 offshore oil and gas platforms. Chevron Corp. began restaffing its Blind Faith and Petronius platforms in the Gulf of Mexico, according to Reuters.

The brief interruption had little lasting effect on oil prices and should have even less on what consumers pay for gasoline. AAA reports gasoline demand this month is at levels that haven’t been seen since mid-June when the country was just beginning to reopen from the long coronavirus (COVID-19) shutdown.

While demand was low this week, so were supplies, at least compared to recent weeks. But AAA’s Jeanette Casselano says that balance favored consumers.

 “Despite the steady supply dip, continued low levels of demand helped push the national gas price cheaper on the week," Casselano said.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.25)

  • California ($3.22)

  • Washington ($2.82)

  • Nevada ($2.67)

  • Oregon ($2.64)

  • Alaska ($2.54)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.49)

  • Utah ($2.45)

  • Idaho ($2.45)

  • Colorado ($2.31)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.85)

  • Texas ($1.86)

  • Arkansas ($1.88)

  • Louisiana ($1.89)

  • Missouri ($1.89)

  • Alabama ($1.90)

  • Oklahoma ($1.90)

  • South Carolina ($1.91)

  • Tennessee ($1.92)

  • Kentucky ($1.93)

Motorists seem to have parked their cars now that the summer driving season is over. Even a hurricane slamming the Gulf Coast failed to overcome a big drop...
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Unofficial end of summer brings a drop in gasoline prices

Moving into fall, AAA says consumers should see even lower prices

The days immediately after Labor Day saw gasoline prices dip in most areas of the country as oil prices declined, along with demand for fuel.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.20 a gallon, two cents less than a week ago. The price hasn’t fluctuated more than six cents a gallon over the last month.

The average price of premium gas is $2.81 a gallon, two cents less than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel has remained stable over the last month at $2.42 a gallon.

“Summer may be fading into the rearview mirror, but less expensive gas prices are not,” said Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson. “Moving into fall we traditionally see a drop in demand and further savings at the pump. This year that means pump prices could possibly push even lower then we’ve already seen in 2020.”

Prices declined in nearly every state during the week, though there were some exceptions. However, even when prices were higher it was usually no more than a penny or two over the previous week.

In its mid-week report, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed oil supplies grew over the last week while demand for gasoline declined. That sent oil prices even lower, closing Thursday below $40 a barrel.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.24)

  • Hawaii ($3.24)

  • Washington ($2.83)

  • Oregon ($2.66)

  • Nevada ($2.68)

  • Alaska ($2.55)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.51)

  • Utah ($2.47)

  • Idaho ($2.46)

  • Colorado ($2.34)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.88)

  • Texas ($1.89)

  • Louisiana ($1.91)

  • Missouri ($1.91)

  • Arkansas ($1.91)

  • Alabama ($1.91)

  • Oklahoma ($1.92)

  • South Carolina ($1.95)

  • Tennessee ($1.96)

  • Kansas ($1.99)

The days immediately after Labor Day saw gasoline prices dip in most areas of the country as oil prices declined, along with demand for fuel.The AAA Fu...
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Labor Day weekend motorists should find stable gas prices

The number of travelers is expected to exceed Memorial Day and Independence Day

Gas prices remained largely unchanged this week in spite of storm damage in the Gulf of Mexico and an approaching holiday weekend. Labor Day travelers should find prices at the pump about 34 cents a gallon less than last Labor Day weekend.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.22 a gallon, just a penny less than last Friday. The average price of premium is $2.82 a gallon, the same as last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.42 a gallon, a penny cheaper than last week.

The Memorial Day and Independence Day weekends saw far fewer motorists on the road than in years past but more people may hit the road over the Labor Day weekend. 

"For several weeks, we were all staying home per orders from our governors, but now with many restrictions lifted more people are willing to venture out, but still close to home," said Roger Block, president of Travel Leaders Network, a national travel agency.

The firm says 50 percent of travel requests submitted through the TravelLeaders.com website are for travel options between Fall 2020 and year's end.

Car buying could impact fuel prices

New research from Cars.com shows nearly 60 percent of Americans plan to travel this Labor Day weekend, nearly double the number compared to Memorial Day. The overwhelming majority say they plan to drive.

Because of that, Cars.com predicts car dealers will get visits this weekend from many of the people who aren’t on the road.

"We have tracked consumer sentiment about car buying and travel habits during the pandemic for months now — and our findings continue to show that more and more people are turning to car ownership because of the safety and freedom it provides," said Kelsey Mays, senior consumer affairs editor, Cars.com. "And, interestingly enough, this new generation of buyers - many who previously did not own a car, particularly in urban areas - are looking at sedans over the typically popular SUVs or crossovers as their vehicle of choice."

All of this could impact fuel prices down the road, causing demand to rise faster than expected. AAA points out that gasoline demand spiked in the last week and refinery operations in the Lake Charles, La., region are still down after Hurricane Laura stormed through the region late last month. So far, however, it’s had little impact on prices at the pump.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.24)

  • Hawaii ($3.23)

  • Washington ($2.83)

  • Oregon ($2.67)

  • Nevada ($2.69)

  • Alaska ($2.55)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.52)

  • Utah ($2.48)

  • Idaho ($2.46)

  • Colorado ($2.36)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.88)

  • Louisiana ($1.91)

  • Texas ($1.91)

  • Arkansas ($1.92)

  • Alabama ($1.93)

  • Oklahoma ($1.93)

  • Missouri ($1.93)

  • Tennessee ($1.98)

  • South Carolina ($1.99)

  • Kansas ($2.01)

Gas prices remained largely unchanged this week in spite of storm damage in the Gulf of Mexico and an approaching holiday weekend. Labor Day travelers shou...
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Gas prices have peaked for 2020, AAA says

Fuel prices may head lower going into the fall months

Despite a slow increase in gasoline demand in the last couple of weeks, prices at the pump stayed stable for another week across much of the U.S.

The national average price of regular gas is $2.18 a gallon, just a penny more than last Friday. Prices remain about 42 cents a gallon less than at this time in 2019. The average price of premium gas is $2.79 a gallon, also one cent more than last week. The average price of diesel fuel remains at $2.42 a gallon, the same as a week ago.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that an increase in gasoline demand last week drew gasoline inventories down, but supplies remain plentiful when compared to previous years. Therefore, there should be little impact on prices since the summer driving season is nearly over.

“Gas prices are stalling, if not decreasing, at the vast majority of pumps,” said Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson. “We’ve likely seen gasoline prices peak for 2020, barring any major hurricanes.”

Nationwide, AAA reported that 72 percent of all gas stations were selling gas for less than $2.25. Forty-one percent are selling fuel for under $2 a gallon. Compared to last August, the U.S. has 12 million more barrels of gasoline on hand.

In the weeks ahead, oil refineries will begin switching over to winter-grade gasoline blends, which cost less than summertime fuel. Because of that, there should be very little to raise gasoline prices heading into the end of the year.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.23)

  • California ($3.12)

  • Washington ($2.81)

  • Oregon ($2.66)

  • Nevada ($2.66)

  • Alaska ($2.53)

  • Utah ($2.44)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.43)

  • Idaho ($2.42)

  • Colorado ($2.39)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.83)

  • Louisiana ($1.85)

  • Arkansas ($1.87)

  • Texas ($1.87)

  • Alabama ($1.87)

  • Oklahoma ($1.89)

  • Missouri ($1.89)

  • Tennessee ($1.90)

  • South Carolina ($1.91)

  • Kansas ($1.97)

Despite a slow increase in gasoline demand in the last couple of weeks, prices at the pump stayed stable for another week across much of the U.S.The na...
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Rising COVID-19 cases hold down gas prices

The national average saw little movement during the week

Even a tropical storm that roared up the East Coast at the beginning of the week did little to raise gasoline prices as the coronavirus (COVID-19) continued to dampen demand for fuel.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline today is $2.18 a gallon, the same as it’s been for the last two weeks. A year ago, regular fuel was selling for $2.70 a gallon.

The average price of premium gasoline is just as stable at $2.79 a gallon, the same as last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.42 a gallon, a penny less than last week.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that demand for gasoline ticked up a bit this week compared to the week before. But compared to this time last year, demand is down 8 percent.

“This summer is no doubt the cheapest at the pump for motorists in more than a decade. The last two months have yielded a national average of $2.14,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “While we expect to see typical fluctuation, August gas prices are not expected to spike, especially amid increases in COVID-19 cases.” 

Motorists in most states saw little change in pump prices over the last seven days, though in Utah consumers saw their gas prices jump 10 cents a gallon. The average price in Michigan rose six cents a gallon.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.24)

  • California ($3.18)

  • Washington ($2.80)

  • Oregon ($2.65)

  • Nevada ($2.65)

  • Alaska ($2.52)

  • Utah ($2.46)

  • Colorado ($2.43)

  • Idaho ($2.43)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.42)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.82)

  • Louisiana ($1.85)

  • Texas ($1.85)

  • Arkansas ($1.87)

  • Alabama ($1.87)

  • Oklahoma ($1.88)

  • Missouri ($1.89)

  • South Carolina ($1.90)

  • Tennessee ($1.90)

  • North Carolina ($1.96)

Even a tropical storm that roared up the East Coast at the beginning of the week did little to raise gasoline prices as the coronavirus (COVID-19) continue...
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Gas prices remain stable as motorists curb their driving

The summer driving season hasn’t really materialized this year

Consumers continued to enjoy stable gasoline prices this week as many cars remained parked and demand for fuel continued to fall.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.18 a gallon, nearly the same as last week and 53 cents a gallon less than last year at this time. The average price of premium gas is $2.80 a  gallon, a penny more than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel has remained at $2.43 a gallon for several weeks.

At midweek, GasBuddy’s head of petroleum analysis, Patrick DeHaan, reported falling usage, with demand on Tuesday 6 percent lower than seven days earlier. 

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported this week that energy use in April, when Americans were sheltering in place, plunged to a 30-year low. Since then, consumers have literally kept their foot off the gas.

“Pump prices are mostly pushing cheaper across the country as gasoline demand wanes over the past few weeks,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA’s spokesperson. “Gas prices are likely to fluctuate throughout the rest of the summer due to COVID-19 concerns, with the national average possibly reaching $2.25.”

When prices fluctuated this week, it was mostly to the downside. Prices fell a few cents a gallon in Michigan, Indiana, and North Carolina. 

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.23)

  • California ($3.17)

  • Washington ($2.80)

  • Oregon ($2.66)

  • Nevada ($2.65)

  • Alaska ($2.52)

  • Colorado ($2.44)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.41)

  • Idaho ($2.40)

  • Illinois ($2.38)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.83)

  • Louisiana ($1.86)

  • Texas ($1.88)

  • Arkansas ($1.89)

  • Alabama ($1.89)

  • Missouri ($1.90)

  • Oklahoma ($1.90)

  • South Carolina ($1.91)

  • Tennessee ($1.93)

  • Kansas ($1.97)

Consumers continued to enjoy stable gasoline prices this week as many cars remained parked and demand for fuel continued to fall.The AAA Fuel Gauge Sur...
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Gas prices dip as COVID-19 cases spike

Falling demand and rising supplies have kept prices in check this summer

Gasoline prices drifted slightly lower across much of the U.S. this week as the rising number of coronavirus (COVID-19) cases in many states discouraged travel.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.18 a gallon, down from $2.20 a week ago. The average price remains 57 cents a gallon less than at this time a year ago. The average price of premium gas is $2.79 a gallon, a penny less than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.43 a gallon, the same as it has been for several weeks.

AAA says prices have remained very stable this week; one-third of states saw gas prices fall slightly and only 10 states saw gas prices increase by two to four cents. State averages saw minimal fluctuation as demand roughly held steady over the last four weeks. 

“During the last month, demand has averaged about 8.6 million barrels a day while gasoline stocks have steadily declined,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA’s spokesperson. “Week by week, we are seeing mostly regional fluctuation at the pump based on gasoline supply and demand.”

Because of the coronavirus, gasoline demand has not been anything close to normal for the last four months. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that consumers are using about 8.6 million barrels of gasoline a day.

Demand for fuel is 6 percent less than at this time last year. Despite cutbacks at oil refineries, gasoline supplies are still 7 percent higher year-over-year.

Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio saw average gas prices fall around six cents a gallon this week while prices were up around 4 cents in New Mexico.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.24)

  • California ($3.14)

  • Washington ($2.80)

  • Oregon ($2.66)

  • Nevada ($2.64)

  • Alaska ($2.53)

  • Colorado ($2.46)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.44)

  • Illinois ($2.37)

  • Arizona ($2.35)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.84)

  • Louisiana ($1.86)

  • Arkansas ($1.89)

  • Alabama ($1.89)

  • Texas ($1.90)

  • Missouri ($1.91)

  • Oklahoma ($1.91)

  • South Carolina ($1.91)

  • Tennessee ($1.92)

  • Kansas ($1.98)

Gasoline prices drifted slightly lower across much of the U.S. this week as the rising number of coronavirus (COVID-19) cases in many states discouraged tr...
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Gas prices are slightly higher as more states reopen

Fuel supplies are tightening, putting pressure on prices at the pump

As more states try to get back to normal after a coronavirus (COVID-19) shutdown, consumers are driving more miles. In the last week, prices rose slightly in nearly every state.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey puts the national average price of regular gasat $2.20 a gallon, about a penny more than last week but much lower than mid-July 2019. The average price of premium gas is $2.80 a gallon, one cent more than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.43 a gallon, the same as a week ago.

Motorists are driving a little more, and refineries are cutting back on supplies. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported at mid-week that gasoline stockpiles fell by more than 3 million barrels in the previous week. But compared to this time a year ago, supplies are up nearly 7 percent.

Jeanette Casselano, a spokesperson for AAA, says supply and demand appear to be in a state of flux, especially since some states, such as California, are in the midst of reclosing parts of its economy. 

“The Energy Information Administration’s data shows gasoline demand and supply continue on a roller coaster ride,” Casselano said. “As motorists react to unfolding COVID-19 information, we are seeing driving behaviors related to filling-up ebb and flow.”

As a result, gasoline prices, though slowly rising, have been stable over the last few weeks, with Indiana, Michigan, and Delaware among the states experiencing the largest increase in price at the pump this week.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.23)

  • California ($3.13)

  • Washington ($2.79)

  • Nevada ($2.64)

  • Oregon ($2.65) 

  • Alaska ($2.52)

  • Colorado ($2.47)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.44)

  • Illinois ($2.39)

  • Idaho ($2.34)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.84)

  • Louisiana ($1.87)

  • Arkansas ($1.90)

  • Texas ($1.92)

  • Alabama ($1.90)

  • Missouri ($1.93)

  • Oklahoma ($1.91)

  • South Carolina ($1.94)

  • Tennessee ($1.94)

  • Kansas ($1.98)

As more states try to get back to normal after a coronavirus (COVID-19) shutdown, consumers are driving more miles. In the last week, prices rose slightly...
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Gas price rise stalls as coronavirus cases spike

Demand dipped as many people reconsidered travel plans

The recent steady rise in gasoline prices appeared to stall this week as a number of states reported a surge in coronavirus (COVID-19) cases.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the price of regular gas is $2.19 a gallon, two cents more than last week. The average price of premium gas is $2.79 a gallon, just a penny more than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel remains nearly the same as last week -- $2.44 a gallon.

In spite of last weekend’s Independence Day holiday, gasoline demand remained tepid over the last few days. Analysts suggest that the sharp rise of cases in Arizona, California, Texas, and Florida may have caused many people to reconsider holiday outings.

“Independence Day weekend gas prices were nearly 60 cents cheaper than last year and on top of that, they were the most inexpensive prices seen for the holiday since 2004,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA’s spokesperson.

Most states reported stable prices at the pump over the last week. In areas where prices did rise, it wasn’t always a matter of supply and demand. Several states increased their gasoline tax effective July 1, including California, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Nebraska, South Carolina and Maryland.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.23)

  • California ($3.10)

  • Washington ($2.75)

  • Nevada ($2.63)

  • Oregon ($2.62) 

  • Alaska ($2.51)

  • Colorado ($2.47)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.44)

  • Illinois ($2.40)

  • Idaho ($2.34)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.83)

  • Louisiana ($1.85)

  • Arkansas ($1.88)

  • Texas ($1.88)

  • Alabama ($1.89)

  • Missouri ($1.89)

  • Oklahoma ($1.90)

  • South Carolina ($1.92)

  • Tennessee ($1.94)

  • Virginia ($1.98)

The recent steady rise in gasoline prices appeared to stall this week as a number of states reported a surge in coronavirus (COVID-19) cases.The AAA Fu...
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July 4th travelers can expect the lowest gas prices since 2004

Prices at the pump have been fairly stable in the last week

Gasoline prices have steadily risen off their lockdown lows in recent weeks, but they’re still a lot less than at this time last year. Independence weekend travelers will find the lowest July 4th gas prices in 15 years.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey puts the national average price of regular gas at $2.17 a gallon, about the same price as a week ago. Going into the Independence Day holiday last year, the average price was $2.73 a gallon. The average price of premium gas is $2.78 a gallon, three cents more than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.43 a gallon, the same as last week.

‘Anything but a normal year’

Gas prices have been held in check by the coronavirus (COVID-19), which crushed demand in April and May. Prices began to rise again in early June, but Patrick DeHaan, head of Petroleum Analysis at GasBuddy, says there is currently little to push prices much higher.

“2020 continues to be anything but a normal year, and low gas prices have persisted into summer’s unofficial halfway point, Independence Day,” DeHaan said. “While gasoline demand has continued to rebound, there is anxiety about the recent surge in new coronavirus cases in the U.S., and that could prevent gas prices from seeing a continued rebound.”

That said, the U.S. has the lowest summer gas prices in about 15 years. But prices could show some volatility in the weeks ahead, depending on the severity of the pandemic.

“Conditions to socially distance and hit the road remain ripe for those able to do so,” DeHaan said. “Prices in all 50 states remain well-below year-ago levels, but should the coronavirus situation improve significantly, gas prices will follow.”

DeHaan predicts that at the end of the day, the summer of 2020 will have the cheapest gas prices American motorists have seen in well over a decade.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.21)

  • California ($3.07)

  • Washington ($2.72)

  • Nevada ($2.61)

  • Oregon ($2.59) 

  • Alaska ($2.49)

  • Colorado ($2.46)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.43)

  • Illinois ($2.37)

  • Idaho ($2.34)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.82)

  • Louisiana ($1.84)

  • Arkansas ($1.87)

  • Alabama ($1.88)

  • Missouri ($1.88)

  • Texas ($1.89)

  • Oklahoma ($1.91)

  • South Carolina ($1.93)

  • Tennessee ($1.94)

  • Virginia ($1.96)

Gasoline prices have steadily risen off their lockdown lows in recent weeks, but they’re still a lot less than at this time last year. Independence weekend...
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Gasoline prices continued to creep higher this week

Most states see gradually rising prices in spite of falling demand

Gas prices are still rising, partly a result of consumers leaving the house more and partly the result of prices returning to their normal seasonal pattern.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.17 a gallon, about six cents higher than last Friday. But that’s still 50 cents a gallon less than at this time in 2019. The average price of premium gas is $2.77 a gallon, five cents more than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.44 a gallon, two cents more than last week.

Prices are still rising even though gasoline demand isn’t anywhere near its normal summertime levels. GasBuddy reported at midweek that demand was down 0.2 percent from the previous Wednesday but 13.3 percent higher than a month ago. Measured year-over-year, however, demand is down 18.2 percent.

“Demand levels are likely to ebb and flow in the coming weeks as people continue to be cautious about travel,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “As a result, pump prices will likely continue to increase, but at a slower rate through the end of the month.”

Prices at the pump were slightly higher in just about every state over the last week, with few states seeing a spike. Colorado saw one of the biggest weekly increases, with the average price rising 10 cents a gallon.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.19)

  • California ($3.06)

  • Washington ($2.71)

  • Nevada ($2.60)

  • Oregon ($2.59) 

  • Alaska ($2.48)

  • Colorado ($2.44)

  •  Pennsylvania ($2.42)

  • Illinois ($2.37)

  • Idaho ($2.33)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.81)

  • Louisiana ($1.83)

  • Arkansas ($1.87)

  • Alabama ($1.87)

  • Missouri ($1.87)

  • Texas ($1.88)

  • Oklahoma ($1.90)

  • South Carolina ($1.93)

  • Kansas ($1.94)

  • Tennessee ($1.94)

Gas prices are still rising, partly a result of consumers leaving the house more and partly the result of prices returning to their normal seasonal pattern...
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Gas prices hit $2 a gallon for the first time since late March

Formerly home-bound consumers have hit the road again

The price of gasoline has reached a post-COVID-19 milestone, inching back over the $2 a gallon mark for the first time since the virus forced millions of Americans to stay home and demand for gasoline crashed.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline hit $2 a gallon today, higher than it’s been in months but 80 cents a gallon cheaper than it was a year ago. The average price of premium gas is $2.60, only two cents higher than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.40 a gallon, a penny cheaper than last Friday.

Prices have risen over the last three weeks as states begin to lift travel restrictions. Even so, gasoline supplies are abundant though demand for fuel has suddenly accelerated.

GasBuddy demand data shows demand for gasoline was 5.5 percent higher by mid-week from the previous week and 8 percent higher than a month ago.

“Americans are slowly but steadily returning to driving, causing gas prices to increase across the country,” said Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson. “The good news is gas is still cheap. Motorists can fill-up for $2/gallon or less at 70% of gas stations across the country.”

Prices were mostly stable across the U.S., rising two to three cents a gallon in most states. Idaho was an outlier, with the average statewide price jumping seven cents a gallon.

At week's end, the greatest uncertainty about fuel prices centered on a tropical depression moving north through the Gulf of Mexico. Should it strengthen to hurricane status before Monday's expected landfall, it could pose a threat to the region's oil refineries.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.19)

  • California ($2.92)

  • Washington ($2.55)

  • Nevada ($2.48)

  • Oregon ($2.46) 

  • Alaska ($2.30)

  • Illinois ($2.25)

  • Utah ($2.25)

  •  Pennsylvania ($2.24)

  • Idaho ($2.24)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.61)

  • Louisiana ($1.66)

  • Texas ($1.66)

  • Arkansas ($1.67)

  • Alabama ($1.67)

  • Oklahoma ($1.68)

  • Missouri ($1.68)

  • South Carolina ($1.69)

  • Kansas ($1.71)

  • Tennessee ($1.73)

The price of gasoline has reached a post-COVID-19 milestone, inching back over the $2 a gallon mark for the first time since the virus forced millions of A...
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Gas prices shouldn’t increase that much, industry analysts say

A big drop in demand and increasing stockpiles should keep prices stable

The price of gasoline has risen over the last two weeks after states started to lift stay-at-home restrictions, but industry data suggests that prices at the pump won’t go much higher.

If you enjoy low gasoline prices where you live, there’s a good chance you’ll continue to do that for the rest of the year. While fuel demand has begun to rise, it may not be enough to cause much of an increase in prices. That’s because there were massive amounts of crude oil and refined gasoline on hand before the coronavirus (COVID-19) brought world economies to a halt.

Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, has been following the gasoline supply numbers closely. Over the weekend, he reported on Twitter that GasBuddy’s gasoline demand numbers showed a 5 percent drop from the previous Friday, when demand for fuel should have been rising.

“While gasoline demand has rebounded off lows, yesterday's U.S. demand was down 29.25 percent from a year ago,” he tweeted on Saturday.

Gas price freefall

Gasoline prices went into a freefall in late March, precisely at the time when wholesalers have traditionally charged more for fuel. In a normal year, the price rises until around Memorial Day before beginning to drift lower throughout the summer.

Not only has the coronavirus lockdown reversed that price trend, it has created huge stockpiles of both crude oil and gasoline. Industry experts say it will take a while to work through that surplus and, with about 40 million people out of work and others still limiting their activities, it might take much longer than usual.

CSP, a convenience store trade publication, reports that convenience stores have seen a huge drop in gasoline sales. It quotes Joe Petrowski -- senior adviser for Yesway, West Des Moines, Iowa, and former CEO of Cumberland Gulf Group -- who predicts that the average retailer could face a 23,000 gallon per week decline in gasoline sales in the near term.

Work-at-home trend

If the work-at-home trend takes hold, even after restrictions are lifted, it will likely depress consumer demand for gasoline even more. IHS Markit has predicted that U.S. gasoline demand could plunge by 50 percent until things start getting back to normal.

However, the gasoline futures market is telling a different story. Gasoline futures prices have tripled off their lows and appear to be going higher, even as the industry is confronted with a supply glut that should suggest falling prices.

As a result, consumers may see wide variations in gas prices in the weeks ahead, as some stations try to maintain their profit margins and make up for lost revenue. For that reason, consumers may find the lowest prices at big-box retailers that use gasoline as a loss-leader to get customers in the store. 

The price of gasoline has risen over the last two weeks after states started to lift stay-at-home restrictions, but industry data suggests that prices at t...
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The average price of gasoline is closing in on $2 a gallon

Prices rose in just about every state in the last week

The price of gasoline rose in just about every state in the last week as more consumers increased their driving and states began to lift coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is closing in on $2 a gallon, rising three cents a gallon since last Friday to $1.97 a gallon. It’s 21 cents a gallon higher than a month ago. The average price of premium gas is $2.58 a gallon, four cents higher than last week. The average price of diesel fuel has remained stable over the last two weeks at $2.41 a gallon and is four cents a gallon cheaper than a month ago.

Gas prices normally rise during the spring, but industry analysts point to two other factors contributing to higher prices at the pump. Oil prices have begun to recover from their record lows during the height of the lockdown but remain under $40 a barrel.

Demand is also up when compared to April. However, it’s still well below demand recorded in May 2019. That’s one reason gas prices are about 90 cents a gallon less than they were last year.

“Americans have seen significantly cheaper-than-normal gas prices the past two months,” said AAA spokesperson Jeanette Casselano. “While motorists will see pump prices continue to increase, AAA does not expect the summer average to be as expensive as last year’s season.”

One wildcard that could send prices sharply higher is a couple of bad hurricanes. The 2020 hurricane season begins Monday, and storms that hit the Gulf Coast region particularly hard could interrupt supplies and send prices sharply higher, at least temporarily.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.17)

  • California ($2.88)

  • Washington ($2.52)

  • Oregon ($2.44) 

  • Nevada ($2.43)

  •  Pennsylvania ($2.23)

  • Illinois ($2.23)

  • Alaska ($2.22)

  • Utah ($2.21)

  • New York ($2.18)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.58)

  • Arkansas ($1.63)

  • Alabama ($1.63)

  • Louisiana ($1.64)

  • Texas ($1.64)

  • Oklahoma ($1.65)

  • Missouri ($1.65)

  • South Carolina ($1.67)

  • Kansas ($1.68)

  • Tennessee ($1.70)

The price of gasoline rose in just about every state in the last week as more consumers increased their driving and states began to lift coronavirus (COVID...
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Memorial Day travelers will find rising gas prices this weekend

Gas prices jump eight cents a gallon in the last week

While it’s true that far fewer motorists are expected to be on the road this Memorial Day weekend, those who are traveling will probably face rising gasoline prices. Still, the prices will be a lot lower than at this time last year.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $1.94 a gallon, eight cents higher than last weekend. But that’s 90 cents less per gallon than last Memorial Day weekend. The average price of premium gas is $2.54 a gallon, five cents higher than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.41, about the same as last week.

Even though gas prices have started to move higher in the last 10 days as coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions have begun to be lifted, prices are still historically low.

“Gas prices around Memorial Day have not been this cheap in nearly 20 years,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA’s spokesperson. “However, as the country continues to practice social distancing, this year’s unofficial kick-off to summer is not going to drive the typical millions of Americans to travel. Despite inexpensive gas prices, AAA anticipates this year’s holiday will likely set a record low for travel volume.”

AAA says motorists can expect gas prices to continue to rise and perhaps go back over $2 a gallon in the next week. As states reopen, demand for gas will increase. At the same time, stations will switch over to summer blends of gasoline, which will cost more.

But consumers shouldn’t face sudden spikes in prices since oil prices remain low and demand may be slow to reach pre-shutdown levels.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.18)

  • California ($2.83)

  • Washington ($2.48)

  • Oregon ($2.41) 

  • Nevada ($2.37)

  •  Pennsylvania ($2.20)

  • Illinois ($2.18)

  • New York ($2.17)

  • Utah ($2.14)

  • Alaska ($2.11)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($1.55)

  • Arkansas ($1.58)

  • Oklahoma ($1.59)

  • Texas ($1.59)

  • Alabama ($1.60)

  • Missouri ($1.61)

  • Louisiana ($1.63)

  • Kansas ($1.64)

  • South Carolina ($1.64)

  • Tennessee ($1.66)

While it’s true that far fewer motorists are expected to be on the road this Memorial Day weekend, those who are traveling will probably face rising gasoli...
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Big increases in the Midwest send national gas prices higher

Demand has also increased as more states open up

Gasoline prices resumed their seasonal climb over the last week as more states lifted stay-at-home restrictions and motorists started buying more fuel. Some of the biggest increases occurred in the Midwest and Great Lakes states.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of gasoline is $1.87 a gallon, a nickel increase over last Friday. The average is $1 less than at this time last year. The average price of premium gas is $2.49, four cents higher than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.41, a penny less than last week.

“Pump prices are fluctuating throughout the country as demand increases and gasoline stocks decrease,” said Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson. “The boost in demand continues to push pump prices up around the country, as more states re-open businesses. Motorists in the Great Lakes, Central, South, and Southeast states are seeing the most volatility at the pump.”

For those in the Southeast, it was the good kind of volatility. At a time when prices are rising in most states, motorists in Georgia enjoyed a four cents a gallon drop in the average price of gas. 

The Southeast is once again the region with the lowest fuel prices while low prices in the Great Lakes states have evaporated over the last two weeks. Wisconsin, which led the nation with the lowest prices for gas, has seen its statewide average surge 46 cents a gallon in the last two weeks.

“For those wondering where those low gas prices in the Great Lakes went, spot gasoline in Chicago, the foundation for the Great Lakes, has surged 286% over the last ~4 weeks,” Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, wrote in a tweet.

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.18)

  • California ($2.77)

  • Washington ($2.45)

  • Oregon ($2.38) 

  • Nevada ($2.33)

  • New York ($2.16)

  • Illinois ($2.13)

  •  Pennsylvania ($2.11)

  • Arizona ($2.08)

  • Alaska ($2.06)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Oklahoma ($1.51)

  • Arkansas ($1.51)

  • Mississippi ($1.51)

  • Missouri ($1.53)

  • Texas ($1.54)

  • Kansas ($1.56)

  • Alabama ($1.57)

  • South Carolina ($1.59)

  • Louisiana ($1.61)

  • Tennessee ($1.62)

Gasoline prices resumed their seasonal climb over the last week as more states lifted stay-at-home restrictions and motorists started buying more fuel. Som...
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Gas prices start moving higher

Big price increases in the Midwest have raised the national average

Gasoline prices have ended their freefall caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19) and have begun moving higher this week, but only in certain parts of the country.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the average price of regular gas is $1.82 a gallon, five cents more than last Friday. However, it’s still $1.06 less than it was a year ago. The average price of premium gas is $2.44 a gallon, three cents more than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.42 a gallon, also two cents more than last week.

The price hikes were highly localized. In all 10 states with the most expensive gas, the statewide average price either went down slightly or stayed the same. The biggest changes occurred in the 10 states with the cheapest gas.

Wisconsin, which had the cheapest gas in the nation for the last three weeks, fell out of the top 10 when its average price surged 36 cents a gallon in seven days. It was joined by Ohio and Michigan, both of which saw double-digit price increases.

Prices had been held artificially low over the last seven weeks as people who normally drove their cars to work were working from home. A lack of gasoline demand and falling crude oil prices combined to offset the usual price hikes this time of year, when refineries curtail output as they perform seasonal maintenance and switch over to producing more expensive summer blends.

Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson, says motorists can expect to see prices at the pump continue to edge higher.

“As some states begin to re-open businesses, those states will likely see demand increase and pump prices will likely follow suit,” she said. “Although U.S. gasoline demand has incrementally increased, it remains below six million barrels a day.”

The states with the most expensive gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.18)

  • California ($2.74)

  • Washington ($2.43)

  • Oregon ($2.38) 

  • Nevada ($2.31)

  • New York ($2.15)

  • Arizona ($2.08)

  • Illinois ($2.04)

  •  Pennsylvania ($2.03)

  • Alaska ($2.01)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Oklahoma ($1.42)

  • Arkansas ($1.43)

  • Missouri ($1.46)

  • Mississippi ($1.48)

  • Kansas ($1.48)

  • Texas ($1.50)

  • Tennessee ($1.54)

  • Kentucky ($1.55)

  • Alabama ($1.55)

  • South Carolina ($1.56)

Gasoline prices have ended their freefall caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19) and have begun moving higher this week, but only in certain parts of the cou...
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Gas prices cheaper than 1960 levels after adjusting for inflation

But the coronavirus-related decline appears to have stabilized

With shutdown orders still in place in most of the country the price of gasoline continued to fall, but it may have reached a bottom, at least for now.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $1.77 a gallon, just penny less than a week ago. The average price of premium gas is two cents less than last week -- $2.41 a gallon. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.44 a gallon, down another four cents in the last seven days.

How do today’s falling gas prices compare to the “good old days” of the 1960s? Better than you might think.

Adjusted for inflation, today’s price of regular gasoline is 93 cents a gallon cheaper that it was 60 years ago, in 1960. That year’s average price of 31 cents a gallon is the equivalent of $2.70 in 2020 dollars.

Prices have continued to slide during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic as demand for gasoline and the price of oil have both crashed. But the price decline this week was offset by sizable increases in a handful of states.

Wisconsin still has the cheapest gas in the nation, but its average price jumped 11 cents a gallon in the last week. Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, said 66 straight days of price declines ended Thursday as the national average price rose by a penny a gallon, though still lower than a week ago.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.20)

  • California ($2.74)

  • Washington ($2.44)

  • Oregon ($2.39) 

  • Nevada ($2.31)

  • New York ($2.16)

  • Arizona ($2.11)

  •  Pennsylvania ($2.03)

  • Alaska ($2.02)

  • Utah ($2.01)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Wisconsin ($1.30)

  • Oklahoma ($1.37)

  • Arkansas ($1.41)

  • Missouri ($1.44)

  • Ohio ($1.45)

  • Michigan ($1.45)

  • Kentucky ($1.45)

  • Iowa ($1.48)

  • Mississippi ($1.48)

  • Kansas ($1.48)

With shutdown orders still in place in most of the country the price of gasoline continued to fall, but it may have reached a bottom, at least for now....
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Gas prices fall again, but less aggressively than last week

Oil prices have stabilized after going negative earlier this month

Gas prices went down this week, but the rate of decline has slowed, even though the price of oil has fallen off a cliff.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $1.78 a gallon, four cents less than last Friday. At this time a year ago the average price was $2.84 a gallon. The average price of premium gas is $2.43 a gallon, five cents less than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.48 a gallon, down three cents from last week.

On Monday, the futures price of oil for May delivery fell past zero to negative $38. Because of a nationwide economic shutdown, demand for gasoline plunged and producers were running out of places to store their oil.

Oil prices recovered later in the week but are still at levels not seen in more than a decade. Demand for gasoline this week remains low but has stabilized, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA).

While the national average is just below $1.80 a gallon, many stations around the country are selling fuel for below $1 a gallon.

“One in four U.S. gas stations is selling gas for $1.49 or less,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “Even with regional refinery rates dropping, we will continue to see gas prices decrease though potentially at a slower rate than the past few weeks.”

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.22)

  • California ($2.78)

  • Washington ($2.49)

  • Oregon ($2.44) 

  • Nevada ($2.35)

  • New York ($2.20)

  • Arizona ($2.17)

  • Utah ($2.08)

  • Alaska ($2.07)

  •  Pennsylvania ($2.06)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Wisconsin ($1.19)

  • Oklahoma ($1.38)

  • Ohio ($1.39)

  • Michigan ($1.43)

  • Kentucky ($1.45)

  • Arkansas ($1.45)

  • Indiana ($1.46)

  • Iowa ($1.49)

  • Missouri ($1.49)

  • Mississippi ($1.52)

  • Kansas ($1.52)

Gas prices went down this week, but the rate of decline has slowed, even though the price of oil has fallen off a cliff.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows...
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Gas prices fall to late 1990s levels

A gallon of gas is a dollar cheaper than at this time a year ago

Adjusted for inflation, gasoline prices haven’t been this low since 1998, when Titanic smashed box office records and Seinfeld was must-see TV.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the average price of regular gas is $1.82 a gallon, six cents less than a week ago. It’s a full dollar a gallon less than what consumers paid at this time a year ago. The average price of premium gas is $2.47 a gallon, also six cents less than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.51, four cents less than a week ago.

At the beginning of the week, AAA reported a sharp drop in gasoline demand, with shelter-in-place rules in many parts of the nation keeping cars off the road. But by mid-week, that trend appeared to be shifting.

“Demand yesterday rose 2.00% from last Wednesday,” Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy wrote in a Thursday tweet. “This week Mon-Wed avg daily demand is up 0.97% from last week same time frame. We haven't seen much more of a drop, but not improving much, either.”

That, along with the rather moderate decline in week-over-week average gas prices, suggests that prices at the pump could be nearing a bottom. The decline may also be slowed by an agreement last week among oil producers to cut production to boost prices.

“While the production cut is historic, it’s likely to not have an immediate impact on pump prices given the ongoing impact the COVID-19 pandemic continues to have on crude oil prices and gasoline demand,” said AAA Spokesperson Jeanette Casselano.

Wisconsin continues to have the cheapest gasoline in the nation, and Hawaii has the most expensive.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.25)

  • California ($2.83)

  • Washington ($2.55)

  • Oregon ($2.51) 

  • Nevada ($2.42)

  • Arizona ($2.25)

  • New York ($2.24)

  • Alaska ($2.15)

  • Utah ($2.14)

  •  Pennsylvania ($2.10)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Wisconsin ($1.26)

  • Oklahoma ($1.39)

  • Ohio ($1.44)

  • Kentucky ($1.49)

  • Michigan ($1.49)

  • Arkansas ($1.50)

  • Indiana ($1.51)

  • Iowa ($1.52)

  • Mississippi ($1.55)

  • Texas ($1.57)

Adjusted for inflation, gasoline prices haven’t been this low since 1998, when Titanic smashed box office records and Seinfeld was must-see TV.The AAA...
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Gas prices fall another eight cents a gallon in the last week

Demand is at its lowest level in recent memory

Demand for gasoline continues to drop, and so do prices at the pump.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $1.88 a gallon, another seven cents lower than a week ago. A year ago, the average gas price was $2.76 a gallon. The average price of premium gas is $2.53 a gallon, compared to $2.61 a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.54 a gallon, four cents less than a week ago.

Gas prices have fallen as oil prices appear to have found a floor on hopes that Saudi Arabia and Russia can reach a deal to reduce the amount of oil they pump into world markets.

“This week, market analysts are watching crude oil prices, which started to increase at the end of last week,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “However, given the low demand readings, increases in crude aren’t likely to have an impact on gas prices in the near-term.”

Making these falling prices even more remarkable is the statistic for refinery output. Currently, the nation’s oil refineries are only running at 82 percent of capacity, the lowest level in three years. But even at that level, they’re producing more gasoline than homebound consumers can buy.

Once again, Wisconsin has the lowest gasoline prices in the nation, with the statewide average dropping 13 cents a gallon in the last seven days. Other Midwestern states -- including Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, and Kentucky -- also have some of the cheapest gasoline prices in the country.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.31)

  • California ($2.91)

  • Washington ($2.64)

  • Oregon ($2.59) 

  • Nevada ($2.51)

  • Alaska ($2.34)

  • Arizona ($2.32)

  • Utah ($2.23)

  • New York ($2.28)

  •  Pennsylvania ($2.13)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Wisconsin ($1.38)

  • Oklahoma ($1.44)

  • Ohio ($1.50)

  • Kentucky ($1.55)

  • Michigan ($1.57)

  • Indiana ($1.58)

  • Mississippi ($1.61)

  • Texas ($1.62)

  • Missouri ($1.62)

  • Iowa ($1.62)

Demand for gasoline continues to drop, and so do prices at the pump.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $1.88...
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Homebound consumers keeping gas prices low

Cheap oil and disappearing demand are combining to push fuel prices to four-year lows

With the coronavirus (COVID-19) keeping millions of Americans at home, gasoline demand has fallen off a cliff, dragging gasoline prices down with it.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $1.95 a gallon, down 10 cents in the last week. It’s also the lowest average price in four years. The average price of premium is $2.61 a gallon, nine cents lower than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.58, a nickel lower than last week.

AAA says the declines at the gas pump aren’t over yet. It notes the price of oil, which fell below $20 a barrel earlier this week before rallying, is a big factor. It predicts the national average price could dip to $1.75 a gallon before the end of April.

“AAA expects gas prices to keep dropping as cheap crude combines with the realities of people staying home and less demand for gas,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. 

In a landmark move, the average price of regular gas fell below $3 a gallon in California for the first time in years. That leaves Hawaii as the only state with an average gas price above $3 a gallon. California gas prices have remained stubbornly high after the state raised the gasoline tax in 2018. 

A large number of states saw prices decline by 10 cents a gallon or more since last Friday, but Wisconsin prices have been in a freefall, declining by 17 cents a gallon over the last week, giving it the distinction of having the lowest gas prices in the nation. 

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.34)

  • California ($2.99)

  • Washington ($2.71)

  • Oregon ($2.67) 

  • Nevada ($2.60)

  • Alaska ($2.47)

  • Arizona ($2.41)

  • Utah ($2.31)

  • New York ($2.31)

  •  Idaho ($2.28)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Wisconsin ($1.49)

  • Oklahoma ($1.50)

  • Ohio ($1.60)

  • Kentucky ($1.64)

  • Michigan ($1.66)

  • Indiana ($1.67)

  • Mississippi ($1.68)

  • Texas ($1.70)

  • Missouri ($1.71)

  • Kansas ($1.72)

With the coronavirus (COVID-19) keeping millions of Americans at home, gasoline demand has fallen off a cliff, dragging gasoline prices down with it.Th...
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Average gas price falls below $2 a gallon in 29 states

Gas prices continue their coronavirus plunge

With Americans told to stay inside and work from home, there have been fewer cars at the gas pump. As a result, prices are in an accelerating freefall.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.05 a gallon, 12 cents less than a week ago and 62 cents cheaper than a year ago. The average price of premium gas is $2.70 a gallon, down 11 cents from last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.63 a gallon, sixt cents less than last week.

“Typically gas prices start to trend more expensive at the beginning of spring, especially as motorists get out to enjoy the warmer weather and travel for spring break. That is not the case this year,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. 

“With Americans urged to stay at home and practice social distancing to slow the spread of coronavirus, we are seeing less traffic on the roadways which will ultimately drive down demand, increase gasoline supply and push pump prices less expensive for the foreseeable future.”

Prices drop in competitive states

At the beginning of the week AAA reported that 29 states had average gas prices under $2 a gallon. Some of the biggest price declines have come in states that sometimes have high prices at the pump. Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin this week have some of the nation’s lowest prices.

Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, says these states often lead gas price declines.

“What’s behind it is that these states see a high level of competition versus others and fall the fastest, but also on the flip, they usually rise amongst the fastest as well,” he told ConsumerAffairs. 

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.41)

  • California ($3.12)

  • Washington ($2.83

  • Oregon ($2.75) 

  • Alaska ($2.63)

  • Nevada ($2.69)

  • Arizona ($2.52)

  • Idaho ($2.40)

  • Utah ($2.39)

  • New York ($2.36) 

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Oklahoma ($1.65)

  • Wisconsin ($1.70)

  • Ohio ($1.71)

  • Kentucky ($1.76)

  • Indiana ($1.77)

  • Michigan ($1.77)

  • Mississippi ($1.78)

  • Texas ($1.80)

  • Missouri ($1.81)

  • South Carolina ($1.81)

With Americans told to stay inside and work from home, there have been fewer cars at the gas pump. As a result, prices are in an accelerating freefall....
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Crashing oil prices send gas prices sharply lower

Experts say prices could go down even more in the days ahead

When Saudi Arabia slashed the price of oil a week ago, it sent a shock wave through the economy but gave motorists a gift -- sharply lower gasoline prices.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.30 a gallon, down 10 cents in the last week. The price is now 21 cents less than a year ago. The average price of premium gas is $2.93 a gallon, eight cents less than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.77, six cents less than seven days ago.

The one-week price drops in some states have been nothing short of dramatic. The statewide average price is down 14 cents a gallon in both Illinois and Indiana, making the latter one of the 10 cheapest states for gas prices.

The average price is lower by 11 cents a gallon in Oklahoma, 10 cents in South Carolina, and nine cents in Missouri. The statewide average price in Texas has fallen below $2 a gallon for the first time in years.

AAA notes that the steep price drop has occurred while U.S. stockpiles of gasoline have declined in the last week and demand has increased.

“Shrinking gas stocks amid rising demand would typically put upward pressure on gasoline prices; however, cheap crude prices have helped to push gas prices lower than expected,” AAA said in its latest market update.”If crude prices remain low, American motorists will likely see continued relief at the pump during the run-up to spring as the world grapples with how to contain the global public health threat and financial risks associated with COVID-19.”

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.53)

  • California ($3.39)

  • Washington ($3.05)

  • Oregon ($2.95) 

  • Alaska ($2.91)

  • Nevada ($2.85)

  • Arizona ($2.70)

  • Idaho ($2.55)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.53)

  • New York ($2.53) 

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Texas ($1.99)

  • Oklahoma ($2.02)

  • Mississippi ($2.03)

  • South Carolina ($2.03)

  • Missouri ($2.04)

  • Louisiana ($2.05)

  • Alabama ($2.06)

  • Arkansas ($2.08)

  • Indiana ($2.08)

  • Kansas ($2.09)

When Saudi Arabia slashed the price of oil a week ago, it sent a shock wave through the economy but gave motorists a gift -- sharply lower gasoline prices....
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Oil prices plunge 20 percent over the weekend

Low gasoline prices are likely to go even lower

An oil price war and escalating fears of the coronavirus are creating a perfect economic storm that will likely have two short-term results that are beneficial to consumers -- falling gasoline prices and record low mortgage rates.

Saudi Arabia launched an oil price war over the weekend, slashing prices by 20 percent overnight. The move is aimed at driving out weaker competitors and came after OPEC was unable to reach a production agreement with Russia.

As a result, U.S. oil refiners will pay significantly less for crude oil at a time when they normally curtail operations for maintenance and boost the price of gasoline. Instead of rising gasoline prices this spring, consumers may find them going even lower.

“Just the third collapse in crude oil prices during my career. 2008, 2015 and now 2020,” GasBuddy’s Patrick DeHaan wrote in a Sunday tweet. “Truly a remarkably past few days- never did I anticipate my somewhat wild prediction 2 weeks ago of $25-$35/bbl WTI coming true.”

Gas stations may react to the lower oil prices this week. Today, the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey puts the national average price of regular gas at $2.38 a gallon, five cents less than a week ago and nine cents less than a year ago.

Blame the coronavirus

The coronavirus is the catalyst in all of this. Fears of the economic damage being caused by the disease caused a sharp drop in oil demand, prompting the Saudis to act. It’s also sending investors fleeing from the world’s stock market and into U.S. Treasury bonds.

The more investors buy bonds, the lower the yield goes. The 10-year bond started trading Monday offering a record low yield of 0.44 percent, with some market analysts predicting it could go to zero.

That, in turn, is sending mortgage rates lower. Just last week, Freddie Mac reported that the average rate on a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage had fallen to 3.29 percent, a record low. With bond yields still falling, home buyers and those refinancing existing mortgages could see even lower rates.

Long-term impact?

While consumers may enjoy lower fuel prices and mortgage rates in the short-term, the longer-term impact is less certain. The twin nose dives of the oil and bond yields have already taken a heavy toll on the value of stock portfolios. Most market-watchers agree that the stock market has farther to fall.

Meanwhile, more attention is being focused on the cause of all this turmoil -- the coronavirus, codenamed COVID-19. Public health officials in the U.S. and abroad continue to ramp up efforts to contain the outbreak, with now over 100,000 confirmed cases in the U.S.

An oil price war and escalating fears of the coronavirus are creating a perfect economic storm that will likely have two short-term results that are benefi...
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Coronavirus fears are keeping gas prices in check

Prices barely moved last week at a time when they usually rise

Fears of the coronavirus have sent oil prices lower, but that has yet to translate into much lower prices at the gas pump. Consumers are paying roughly what they did a week earlier.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.45 a gallon, about a penny less than last Friday. That price is only six cents more than at this time last year.

The average price of premium is $3.05 a gallon, down a penny from last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.86 a gallon, a penny less than last week.

Prices normally start to move higher at this time of year as refineries begin maintenance and switch over to producing more expensive summer blends of gasoline. But Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, says the effects of the coronavirus may alter that seasonal pattern.

DeHaan says plunging oil prices could delay, offset, or shorten the normal seasonal upswing that generally starts this time of year. He says that could translate into a few extra weeks of lower prices at the pump before they begin their inevitable rise.

While most states saw prices edge up slightly during the week Michigan was a happy exception, with motorists enjoying gas prices that were seven cents a gallon lower than the previous week.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.57)

  • California ($3.48)

  • Washington ($3.09)

  • Nevada ($2.90)

  • Oregon ($2.98) 

  • Alaska ($2.94)

  • Arizona ($2.76)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.67)

  • Illinois ($2.65)

  • New York ($2.61) 

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.18)

  • Texas ($2.15)

  • Mississippi ($2.14)

  • Louisiana ($2.17)

  • Alabama ($2.20)

  • Arkansas ($2.20)

  • South Carolina ($2.20)

  • Oklahoma ($2.20)

  • Kansas ($2.22)

  • Virginia ($2.24)

Fears of the coronavirus have sent oil prices lower, but that has yet to translate into much lower prices at the gas pump. Consumers are paying roughly wha...
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Gas prices are moving higher again

Experts say winter prices have likely bottomed

Motorists paid a little more for gasoline this week, particularly in the Southeast where the price at the pump is usually the lowest in the nation. Several southeastern states saw sizable one-week price hikes.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the average price of regular is $2.46 a gallon, three cents higher than a week ago. That’s eight cents less than a month ago. The average price of premium is $3.06 a gallon, up two cents from a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.87 a gallon, two cents cheaper than last week.

Earlier this week, Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, reported that the seasonal rise in gasoline prices appears to have begun. Around this time of year, oil refineries begin maintenance, which reduces output. They will also begin switching over the summer-grade fuel blends, which cost more.

States where prices are generally the cheapest saw some of the biggest price increases this week. The statewide average rose eight cents a gallon in Missouri and Texas and seven cents a gallon in South Carolina.

A decline in gasoline supplies during the previous week also put upward pressure on prices, especially because demand for fuel increased. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports domestic gasoline stocks dropped by 2 million barrels. 

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.57)

  • California ($3.49)

  • Washington ($3.08)

  • Nevada ($2.91)

  • Oregon ($2.97) 

  • Alaska ($2.93)

  • Arizona ($2.77)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.66)

  • Illinois ($2.63)

  • New York ($2.60) 

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.15)

  • Texas ($2.15)

  • Mississippi ($2.12)

  • Louisiana ($2.14)

  • Alabama ($2.17)

  • Arkansas ($2.18)

  • South Carolina ($2.19)

  • Oklahoma ($2.20)

  • Kansas ($2.20)

  • Virginia ($2.22)

Motorists paid a little more for gasoline this week, particularly in the Southeast where the price at the pump is usually the lowest in the nation. Several...
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Consumers still getting a late winter break at the gas pump

The average gas price has fallen slightly in the last week

Uncertainty over the coronavirus is keeping world oil prices low, and that, in turn, continues to push down gasoline prices.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.43 a gallon, down a penny in the last week. It’s 16 cents cheaper than a month ago. The average price of premium is $3.04 a gallon, also one cent lower than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.89, down from $2.91 last week.

In a few weeks, fuel prices will likely start to rise as refineries curtail operations for winter maintenance and begin the switchover to more expensive summer-blend gasoline. But until then, oil prices should continue to give motorists a break at the gas pump.

“At $50 a barrel, West Texas Intermediate crude oil prices are at their cheapest point in a year,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA’s spokesperson. “That, plus steady gasoline stock levels and low demand have helped to push the national average lower – a dime cheaper than three weeks ago.”

Supply and demand remain the biggest factor in falling fuel prices. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported Thursday that gas supplies are still 2.7 million barrels higher than 2019’s level at this time. Meanwhile, EIA estimates demand fell from 8.93 million barrels a day to 8.72 million barrels last week.

Florida led the nation with an eight cents a gallon drop in its average gas price. The average price in North Dakota is down six cents a gallon in the last week.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.60)

  • California ($3.49)

  • Washington ($3.09)

  • Nevada ($2.93)

  • Oregon ($2.97) 

  • Alaska ($2.94)

  • Arizona ($2.78)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.62)

  • New York ($2.61)

  • Vermont ($2.59) 

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.07)

  • Texas ($2.07)

  • Mississippi ($2.09)

  • Louisiana ($2.10)

  • South Carolina ($2.12)

  • Oklahoma ($2.12)

  • Arkansas ($2.15)

  • Kansas ($2.17)

  • Alabama ($2.14)

  • Kentucky ($2.18)

Uncertainty over the coronavirus is keeping world oil prices low, and that, in turn, continues to push down gasoline prices.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey s...
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U.S. gas prices stay low due to coronavirus lowering demand for oil

Oil prices have stabilized but gas prices should continue their decline for a while

A plunge in oil prices due to the fast-spreading coronavirus in China is giving motorists a break at the gas pump. Oil prices stabilized this week, but the effects of cheap crude are being felt nationwide.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.45 a gallon. That’s only three cents lower than a week ago but 13 cents lower than a month ago, as gas prices have drifted lower since the start of 2020. The average price of premium gas is $3.06, down from $3.09 last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.92 a gallon, also three cents less than a week ago.

GasBuddy counts nearly 8,000 stations under $2 a gallon, according to Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy. He reports on Twitter that the average gas price continues to fall in most states while gyrating in “price cycling” states like Indiana, Ohio, and Florida. Price cycling refers to a strategy by gas stations in which they slowly lower their prices to gain market share and then raise them again when prices are so low that they’re losing money.

States in the Southeast and Midwest saw the biggest price declines this week. The statewide average fell six cents a gallon in South Carolina, Louisiana, and Mississippi. It fell nine cents in Ohio and seven cents in Illinois.

Gas prices should continue to fall over the next few weeks. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported Thursday that U.S. gasoline stockpiles continue to grow while wintertime demand for fuel continues to decline.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.63)

  • California ($3.51)

  • Washington ($3.09)

  • Nevada ($2.95)

  • Oregon ($2.98) 

  • Alaska ($2.95)

  • Arizona ($2.80)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.65)

  • New York ($2.64)

  • Vermont ($2.61) 

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.09)

  • Texas ($2.11)

  • Mississippi ($2.13)

  • Louisiana ($2.14)

  • South Carolina ($2.14)

  • Oklahoma ($2.16)

  • Arkansas ($2.18)

  • Kansas ($2.18)

  • Alabama ($2.18)

  • Tennessee ($2.21)

A plunge in oil prices due to the fast-spreading coronavirus in China is giving motorists a break at the gas pump. Oil prices stabilized this week, but the...
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Rising fuel supplies are contributing to falling gas prices

Regular gas is six cents a gallon cheaper over the last week

Increasing supplies of gasoline are benefiting consumers as gasoline wholesalers lose some pricing power. As a result, the decline in gas prices picked up speed this week.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.48 a gallon, down six cents a gallon from last Friday. Gas is 10 cents cheaper than a month ago but 23 cents a gallon more than a year ago. The average price of premium is $3.09 a gallon, down four cents in the last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.95, three cents cheaper than last week.

“Increased total domestic stocks of gasoline have helped to ease pump prices,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “Typically, we see lower demand during this time of year. When combined with higher stock levels, pump prices usually decrease in response.”

In a Twitter post, Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, notes that gas prices are at their lowest point since last March. He predicts the average price could fall to $2.39 a gallon over the next couple of weeks.

Several states led the average price lower. The statewide average dropped seven cents a gallon in South Carolina over the last week. It’s down six cents in Louisiana and five cents a gallon in Mississippi and Virginia.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.64)

  • California ($3.52)

  • Washington ($3.09)

  • Nevada ($2.96)

  • Oregon ($2.97) 

  • Alaska ($2.97)

  • Arizona ($2.81)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.69)

  • New York ($2.67)

  • Connecticut ($2.62) 

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.13)

  • Texas ($2.18)

  • Mississippi ($2.19)

  • Louisiana ($2.20)

  • South Carolina ($2.20)

  • Oklahoma ($2.21)

  • Arkansas ($2.22)

  • Kansas ($2.22)

  • Alabama ($2.24)

  • Tennessee ($2.26)

Increasing supplies of gasoline are benefiting consumers as gasoline wholesalers lose some pricing power. As a result, the decline in gas prices picked up...
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Gasoline prices are still falling as fuel supplies grow

Most states are seeing modest declines in the price at the pump

Gasoline prices drifted slightly lower during the week as winter-time demand remains weak and fuel supplies are growing.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.53 a gallon, three cents lower than last Friday. The price is 28 cents a gallon higher than at this time a year ago. The average price of premium gas is $3.13 a gallon, down three cents in the last seven days. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.98 a gallon, two cents less than last week.

Crude oil prices have fallen since the start of the year, making it less costly for refineries to produce gasoline. At the same time, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports total U.S. gasoline supplies grew by 1.7 million barrels last week, bringing the total up to 260 million barrels.

Estimated gasoline demand grew slightly over the last week but remains lower than demand in January 2019. 

“Increased stocks and low demand have helped the national average to stabilize this week,” AAA said in its latest market update. “As these trends continue, American motorists will likely continue to see lower pump prices.”

Some states saw prices come down faster than others. The statewide average in Michigan is down another nine cents a gallon after falling 10 cents a gallon the week before. Elsewhere, most states saw modest declines in the price at the pump.

This week, only three states -- Hawaii, California, and Washington -- have average gas prices above $3 a gallon.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • California ($3.52)

  • Washington ($3.11)

  • Nevada ($2.98)

  • Oregon ($2.98) 

  • Alaska ($2.96)

  • Arizona ($2.82)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.75)

  • New York ($2.70)

  • Utah ($2.61) 

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.16)

  • Texas ($2.22)

  • Oklahoma ($2.24)

  • Mississippi ($2.24)

  • Arkansas ($2.25)

  • Kansas ($2.26)

  • Louisiana ($2.26)

  • South Carolina ($2.27)

  • Alabama ($2.30)

  • Tennessee ($2.31)

Gasoline prices drifted slightly lower during the week as winter-time demand remains weak and fuel supplies are growing.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows...
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Motorists got a break at the gas pump this week

The average gas price made its biggest one-week decline in more than a month

Gasoline supplies remain plentiful and motorists are filling up less, so the price at the pump is finally trending downward.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.56 a gallon, four cents less than last Friday. The price is back in line with where it was a month ago. The average price of premium is $3.16 a gallon, two cents less than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3 a gallon, a penny less than a week ago.

A variety of factors kept gas prices slightly elevated into the end of 2019 and the beginning of this year. Oil prices were volatile and demand during the holidays was heavier than normal. Now, things seem to be returning to normal.

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported Thursday that total supplies of gasoline rose by 6.7 million barrels last week. Consumers tend to drive less in the winter months, and that trend appears to be reasserting itself.

“Growing stocks — amid lower demand — have helped ease pump prices, lowering the national average,” AAA said in its latest market update.

In a tweet, GasBuddy analyst Patrick DeHaan notes that total U.S. gasoline stockpiles “have never been this high so early in the year, already 3 million barrels ahead of last year and far ahead of the 10-year average of ~239 million barrels for the 2nd week of Jan.”

As a result, some states enjoyed a sizable drop in fuel prices over the last week. The average price of regular is 10 cents a gallon less in Kentucky and Michigan.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • California ($3.53)

  • Washington ($3.12) 

  • Nevada ($2.99)

  • Oregon ($2.99) 

  • Alaska ($2.98)

  • Arizona ($2.83)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.80)

  • New York ($2.71)

  • Utah ($2.64) 

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.19)

  • Oklahoma ($2.25)

  • Texas ($2.26)

  • Mississippi ($2.27)

  • Kansas ($2.28)

  • Arkansas ($2.28)

  • Louisiana ($2.29)

  • South Carolina ($2.32)

  • Alabama ($2.33)

  • Tennessee ($2.34)

Gasoline supplies remain plentiful and motorists are filling up less, so the price at the pump is finally trending downward.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey s...
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Gas prices are slightly higher on conflict with Iran

But U.S. fuel supplies are plentiful and demand is falling

Oil prices have been volatile in response to the growing threat of military conflict between the U.S. and Iran, and prices at the gas pump have moved slightly higher in the last week.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.59 a gallon, a penny higher than last Friday. The price is 36 cents higher than at this time in 2019. The average price of premium is $3.18 a gallon, also a penny more than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.01 a gallon, the same as last week.

Crude oil prices spiked as high as $65.55 in after-hours trading on Tuesday, but price increases have since pulled back, with WTI closing at $59.61 on Wednesday after President Trump signaled that military action will remain on hold for a while.

Wholesale gas prices have also fluctuated, with prices rising in some states but falling in others. The result has been a minimal rise in the national average.

“While there is still clear geopolitical tension, there is no immediate threat to crude supply domestically or globally that can support a sustained increase to crude oil prices or domestic wholesale gasoline prices,” AAA said in its latest market update.

The fact that retail gasoline demand weakened in the last seven days and fuel supplies grew is helping to keep fuel prices stable.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • California ($3.54)

  • Washington ($3.14) 

  • Nevada ($3.01)

  • Oregon ($3.01) 

  • Alaska ($3.00)

  • Arizona ($2.83)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.83)

  • New York ($2.72)

  • Utah ($2.67) 

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.22)

  • Oklahoma ($2.28)

  • Mississippi ($2.28)

  • Kansas ($2.30)

  • Texas ($2.29)

  • Arkansas ($2.30)

  • Louisiana ($2.32)

  • Alabama ($2.36)

  • South Carolina ($2.37)

  • Virginia ($2.38)

Oil prices have been volatile in response to the growing threat of military conflict between the U.S. and Iran, and prices at the gas pump have moved sligh...
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Gas prices start 2020 by moving higher

Heightened military tension between the U.S. and Iran could raise them even more

Despite forecasts that prices at the pump would fall in late December and early 2020, the price of gasoline has started the new year moving higher. New tensions in the Middle East may cause even higher prices in the weeks ahead.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.58 a gallon, three cents higher than a week ago. Regular now sells for an average 33 cents a gallon more than a year ago. The average price of premium is $3.17, also three cents higher than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3 a gallon, a penny more than last week.

The average was largely driven higher by sharp increases in prices in the Midwest and Southeast. Prices rose 11 cents a gallon in Michigan and 9 cents a gallon in Ohio. All of the top 10 states with the cheapest gas -- mostly located in the Southeast -- saw prices at the pump rise in the last week.

“The majority of states saw gas prices increase in the last week – some by as much as a nickel to a dime, but any spikes in gas prices that motorists are seeing will be short-lived,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “AAA expects gas prices to decrease following the holidays.”

But Casselano’s comment came hours before a U.S. drone strike killed Iran’s top general in an airstrike on Iraq’s Baghdad Airport. The airstrike was in retaliation for the Iranian sponsored attack and siege on the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad.

Oil prices surged in overnight trading, with Brent crude prices approaching $70 a barrel and poised to go higher. 

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • California ($3.55)

  • Washington ($3.16) 

  • Nevada ($3.03)

  • Oregon ($3.02) 

  • Alaska ($2.97)

  • Arizona ($2.83)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.79)

  • New York ($2.71)

  • Utah ($2.71) 

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.22)

  • Oklahoma ($2.26)

  • Mississippi ($2.28)

  • Kansas ($2.28)

  • Texas ($2.29)

  • Arkansas ($2.29)

  • Louisiana ($2.32)

  • Alabama ($2.35)

  • South Carolina ($2.36)

  • Virginia ($2.37)

Despite forecasts that prices at the pump would fall in late December and early 2020, the price of gasoline has started the new year moving higher. New ten...
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Gas prices remain fairly stable despite record holiday travel

But a few states are seeing prices start to rise

With a record number of holiday motorists on the nation’s highways in recent days, demand for gasoline remains high and prices have remained mostly stable.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.55 a gallon, the same as a week ago. Prices remain at an average of 26 cents a gallon more than at this time last year. The average price of premium gas is $3.14 a gallon, the same as last Friday. The price of diesel is also the same as drivers paid a week ago -- $2.99 a gallon.

AAA estimates that more than 100 million Americans will be on the road during the period from Christmas through the New Years’ holiday, but stable oil prices and few refinery issues have helped keep up with demand. Only about a dozen states are seeing more expensive gas prices, with increases of less than a dime a gallon.

“AAA forecasts that 104 million Americans will travel by car – the most on record – for a year-end holiday,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “The substantial number of motorists has caused some state averages to increase heading into the holiday week, but these jumps aren’t big and won’t last long or linger past the holiday season.”

But in a Tweet Thursday, Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, reported that prices are beginning to rise in Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • California ($3.57)

  • Washington ($3.18) 

  • Nevada ($3.05)

  • Oregon ($3.04) 

  • Alaska ($3.01)

  • Arizona ($2.84)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.75)

  • Utah ($2.73)

  • Idaho ($2.70) 

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.19)

  • Mississippi ($2.21)

  • Texas ($2.22)

  • Oklahoma ($2.23)

  • Louisiana ($2.24)

  • Arkansas ($2.25)

  • Alabama ($2.27)

  • Kansas ($2.25)

  • South Carolina ($2.28)

  • Tennessee ($2.30)

With a record number of holiday motorists on the nation’s highways in recent days, demand for gasoline remains high and prices have remained mostly stable....
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Gas prices continue to fall into the holidays

But motorists will pay more than they did last year

The price of gasoline continues to fall, making holiday road trips a little more affordable in most of the country.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.55 a gallon, a penny less than a week ago. But holiday travelers will pay an average of 19 cents a gallon more than they did in 2018. The average price of premium is $3.14 a gallon, two cents cheaper than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.99, the same as a week ago.

In its Winter Price Forecast issued Thursday, AAA predicted prices will continue to fall into the end of the year but won’t reach the low levels where they ended 2018. More likely, AAA said the national average will settle into a range between $2.40 and $2.45 a gallon, nearly 20 cents more than last year’s closing price.

Where you live matters

“Depending on where you live in the country, you will see gas prices drop anywhere between a nickel and a quarter this month,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA’s spokesperson. “While that will offer savings to motorists, it is not as much as they saw last December.”

Casselano said the main reason for higher gas prices this year is higher crude oil prices. Last year, fears of a recession -- which never materialized -- sent crude oil prices into a tailspin.

The main reason the average price is falling is price drops west of the Mississippi River. AAA says western states have just about recovered from tight supplies after a number of refinery bottlenecks during the fall.

California gas prices have dropped 57 cents a gallon since October, and Hawaii has regained the dubious honor of having the most expensive fuel in the nation. Missouri has edged out Mississippi as the state with the cheapest gas.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • California ($3.60)

  • Washington ($3.19) 

  • Nevada ($3.10)

  • Oregon ($3.06) 

  • Alaska ($3.05)

  • Arizona ($2.86)

  • Utah ($2.78)

  • Idaho ($2.77) 

  • Pennsylvania ($2.76)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.20)

  • Mississippi ($2.21)

  • Texas ($2.22)

  • Oklahoma ($2.23)

  • Louisiana ($2.23)

  • Alabama ($2.26)

  • Arkansas ($2.26)

  • South Carolina ($2.28)

  • Kansas ($2.27)

  • Virginia ($2.29)

The price of gasoline continues to fall, making holiday road trips a little more affordable in most of the country.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the...
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Gas prices are 17 cents higher than at this time last year

Prices are falling in western states faster than in the East

Motorists planning holiday road trips will likely find stable fuel prices along the way, but prices are significantly higher than at this time last year.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average of regular gasoline is $2.56 a gallon, two cents less than last week. But the price is 17 cents higher than it was a year ago. The price of premium gas is $3.17 a gallon, also two cents lower than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.99 a gallon, down a penny from last Friday.

While prices have been slow to fall for several weeks, Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, says that could change quickly. In a Twitter post, DeHaan said the national average for regular could drop another eight cents a gallon by the holidays, thanks to rising fuel supplies and sluggish demand.

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports total U.S. gasoline supplies rose by 5.4 million barrels last week, bringing the total stockpile to nearly 235 million barrels. At the same time, gasoline demand dropped from just over 9.0 million barrels a day to 8.8 million.

Though the national average gasoline price barely moved, consumers in most of the western states continued to see significant price declines. In California, the price fell 11 cents a gallon in the last seven days; it’s down 37 cents in the last month.

California no longer has the most expensive gas in the nation, but today it slipped into second place behind Hawaii. The cheapest gas in the nation is found in Mississippi.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.66)

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • Washington ($3.24) 

  • Nevada ($3.18)

  • Oregon ($3.10) 

  • Alaska ($3.08)

  • Arizona ($2.88)

  • Idaho ($2.86) 

  • Utah ($2.84)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.78)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.22)

  • Missouri ($2.23)

  • Texas ($2.24)

  • Oklahoma ($2.25)

  • Louisiana ($2.25)

  • Alabama ($2.26)

  • Arkansas ($2.27)

  • South Carolina ($2.28)

  • Kansas ($2.29)

  • Virginia ($2.29)

Motorists planning holiday road trips will likely find stable fuel prices along the way, but prices are significantly higher than at this time last year....
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Rising fuel supplies and falling demand are keeping gas prices steady

The national average price is about the same as last week

Gasoline prices have remained fairly stable in the wake of the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, with prices at the pump rising in states where gas has been cheapest and going down in the most expensive states.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.59 a gallon, at about the same level as last week. The average price is now 15 cents a gallon higher than at this time last year.

The average price of premium gas is $3.18 a gallon, also the same as last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is a penny lower than last week -- $3 a gallon.

In a meeting in Vienna that could be important to the future of gas prices, OPEC ministers agreed Thursday to significant cuts in oil production next year in an effort to boost prices. The oil markets greeted the news with some skepticism, with oil prices barely moving.

One interesting trend over the last week was the rise in prices in states like Louisiana and Tennessee, where prices are typically among the lowest in the nation. At the same time, prices fell in most of the western states, typically the most expensive in the nation.

California still has the most expensive gas of any state, but the statewide average is down seven cents a gallon in the last week and is 32 cents cheaper than a month ago. The result has been a stable national average.

AAA says that stability has been aided by growing stockpiles of gasoline, which have risen for four consecutive weeks. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports gasoline demand fell to just over 9 million barrels a day, only slightly higher than at this time last year.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.75)

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • Washington ($3.29) 

  • Nevada ($3.25)

  • Oregon ($3.16) 

  • Alaska ($3.12)

  • Idaho ($2.93) 

  • Arizona ($2.90)

  • Utah ($2.90)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.81)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Texas ($2.22)

  • Mississippi ($2.23)

  • Missouri ($2.24)

  • Oklahoma ($2.25)

  • Louisiana ($2.26)

  • Alabama ($2.28)

  • South Carolina ($2.29)

  • Arkansas ($2.29)

  • Kansas ($2.30)

  • Virginia ($2.31)

Gasoline prices have remained fairly stable in the wake of the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, with prices at the pump rising in states where gas has been ch...
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Gas prices continue to drift lower as the holidays approach

One of the week’s biggest declines was in California

As motorists prepare to hit the road for next week’s Thanksgiving holiday, they should find fairly stable gas prices. The biggest price fluctuations should be declines.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.59 a gallon, a penny less than last week. That’s almost the same as it was at this time last year. The average price of premium is $3.19, two cents less than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3 a gallon, down one cent from seven days ago.

Prices in most states remained stable over the last week but dropped by 10 cents a gallon in California. That state’s motorists were paying 23 cents a gallon more just one month ago. Consumers in Michigan faced an eight cents a gallon swing in the other direction, seeing the average price go from $2.46 to $2.54 a gallon in the span of seven days.

Prices for premium and diesel fuel have been very stable over the past few weeks, with little to no movement. Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, said in a tweet that’s especially true for diesel.

“It's been a remarkably unremarkable year for U.S. diesel prices,” DeHaan wrote. “The range for the national average diesel price is just 19 cents a gallon so far in 2019, compared to a 42 cents a gallon range in 2018.”

Growth in gasoline stockpiles during the previous week, reversing a couple of weeks of drawdowns, added to stability at the gas pump. The Energy Information Administration (EIA)  Reports total domestic gas stocks grew by 1.8 million barrels last week. 

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.91)

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • Washington ($3.36) 

  • Nevada ($3.32)

  • Oregon ($3.23) 

  • Alaska ($3.17)

  • Idaho ($2.99) 

  • Arizona ($2.93)

  • Utah ($2.95)

  • Colorado ($2.80)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Louisiana ($2.21)

  • Mississippi ($2.21)

  • South Carolina ($2.25)

  • Missouri ($2.27)

  • Texas ($2.25)

  • Alabama ($2.26)

  • Arkansas ($2.29)

  • Oklahoma ($2.29)

  • Tennessee ($2.30)

  • Virginia ($2.30)

As motorists prepare to hit the road for next week’s Thanksgiving holiday, they should find fairly stable gas prices. The biggest price fluctuations should...
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Gasoline prices are falling again

An increase in supply is taking a lot of the pressure off the price at the pump

The price of gasoline reversed direction in the last week, falling slightly. One of the biggest declines took place in California, where the average price has finally fallen below $4 a gallon.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.60 a gallon, down two cents from last Friday. It’s only six cents less than at this time last year. The average price of premium is $3.21 a gallon, a penny less than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.01 a gallon, the same as last week.

In California, the statewide average price of regular has fallen to $3.99 a gallon, the highest in the nation. But it’s a lot lower than a month ago when the average price shot up to $4.17 a gallon due to supply bottlenecks.

Prices have been slow to fall because of heightened demand, but a growing stockpile of fuel last week is taking some of the pressure off prices. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports total domestic stocks of gasoline grew by 1.9 million barrels last week, bringing the current stock level to 219.1 million barrels. While it’s an improvement, the total is 7.5 million barrels less than last year at this time.

“This growth in stock levels, amid robust demand, has helped to push prices down and will likely continue to do so if the trend continues,” AAA said in its latest market update.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.99)

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • Washington ($3.40) 

  • Nevada ($3.37)

  • Oregon ($3.29) 

  • Alaska ($3.19)

  • Idaho ($2.99) 

  • Arizona ($2.94)

  • Utah ($2.92)

  • Colorado ($2.80)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Louisiana ($2.21)

  • Mississippi ($2.22)

  • South Carolina ($2.27)

  • Missouri ($2.29)

  • Texas ($2.26)

  • Alabama ($2.27)

  • Arkansas ($2.30)

  • Virginia ($2.31)

  • Oklahoma ($2.31)

  • Tennessee ($2.33)

The price of gasoline reversed direction in the last week, falling slightly. One of the biggest declines took place in California, where the average price...
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Gasoline prices tick higher in the last week

Supplies are tight, but consumers haven’t stopped hitting the road

Gasoline prices were very stable over the last seven days, but on a national basis, the price at the pump is moving higher, not lower.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.62 a gallon, a penny higher than last Friday. The price is 11 cents cheaper than a year ago. The average price of premium is $3.22, also a penny higher than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.01 a gallon, compared to $3 last week.

For much of the country, it’s been the best of times and the worst of times when it comes to gas prices. In California, the price at the pump has remained stubbornly above $4 a gallon for several weeks. But early in the week, the average price in Michigan was at a 2019 low. In the last few days, it’s risen 11 cents a gallon.

In most states, tight supplies have kept gas prices from falling, but at least they haven’t gone up very much. In its latest report published Thursday, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) revealed that gasoline supplies fell for a sixth straight week. The current fuel stockpile is nearly 11 million barrels less than at this time last year when gasoline prices were higher.

“Reduced stock levels, amid robust demand, helped to push the national gas price average higher this week,” AAA said in its latest market update.

AAA says demand remains high but has fallen from the 9.78 million barrels a day that consumers were using in the previous week.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($4.07)

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • Washington ($3.42) 

  • Nevada ($3.37)

  • Oregon ($3.33) 

  • Alaska ($3.20)

  • Idaho ($2.98) 

  • Arizona ($2.93)

  • Utah ($2.87)

  • Colorado ($2.78)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Louisiana ($2.23)

  • Mississippi ($2.23)

  • South Carolina ($2.27)

  • Missouri ($2.27)

  • Texas ($2.28)

  • Alabama ($2.28)

  • Arkansas ($2.31)

  • Virginia ($2.32)

  • Oklahoma ($2.33)

  • Tennessee ($2.35)

Gasoline prices were very stable over the last seven days, but on a national basis, the price at the pump is moving higher, not lower.The AAA Fuel Gaug...
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Tight supplies are keeping gas prices from falling

Consumer demand for fuel remains high

The price of gasoline has leveled off in the last week -- higher in some places and lower in others. As a result, there was little change in the average of what consumers are paying at the pump.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $2.61 a gallon, the same as last week. Prices are still about four cents lower than they were a month ago. The average price of premium is $3.21 a gallon, a penny lower than seven days ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $3 a gallon, less than a penny a gallon more than last week.

Consumer demand for gasoline remains high, even though the summer driving season is well behind us. That demand reduces supplies and keeps the price from going down.

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported Thursday that gasoline demand rose slightly during the previous week. Gasoline supplies fell for a fifth consecutive week and are now about 6 million barrels lower than at this time last year.

But prices around the nation vary widely. Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, reported this week that Michigan gas prices are at their lowest level since early February. 

The statewide average in Michigan has dropped to below $2.45 a gallon -- 11 cents lower than a week ago and 16 cents cheaper than at this time last month. However, prices are rising in neighboring Ohio. The statewide average is $2.56 a gallon, eight cents higher than last week. The spread between the most expensive and cheapest states is $1.83, skewed by abnormally high prices in California.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($4.06)

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • Washington ($3.43) 

  • Nevada ($3.37)

  • Oregon ($3.34) 

  • Alaska ($3.20)

  • Idaho ($2.93) 

  • Arizona ($2.89)

  • Utah ($2.81)

  • Colorado ($2.78)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Louisiana ($2.23)

  • Mississippi ($2.24)

  • Texas ($2.25)

  • Alabama ($2.27)

  • South Carolina ($2.27)

  • Missouri ($2.28)

  • Arkansas ($2.30)

  • Tennessee ($2.30)

  • Virginia ($2.30)

  • Oklahoma ($2.32)

The price of gasoline has leveled off in the last week -- higher in some places and lower in others. As a result, there was little change in the average of...
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Gas prices are starting to get back to normal

But tight supplies may keep price declines modest

Motorists continue to see relatively stable fuel prices as the summer driving season passes farther in the rearview mirror.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas fell four cents a gallon in the last week to $2.61. That’s four cents cheaper than a month ago and is 22 cents lower than at this time last year. The average price of premium is down four cents a gallon in the last week to $3.22. The average price of diesel fuel has remained stable since the end of the summer at $2.99 a gallon.

A 10 cents a gallon drop in California over the last week helped lower the national average. California prices had been inflated by a series of supply bottlenecks last month, and the state’s average gas price remains well above neighboring states.

Fuel prices have been slow to fall over the last few weeks because gasoline supplies have remained fairly tight. On Thursday, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported gasoline stockpiles declined by 3.1 million barrels in the previous week. 

At the same time, demand has picked up. That’s normally a recipe for higher prices at the pump, but crude oil prices have been a mitigating factor. Oil prices are trading in the mid-$50 range due to concerns about a slowing global economy

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($4.10)

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • Washington ($3.42) 

  • Nevada ($3.40)

  • Oregon ($3.36) 

  • Alaska ($3.14)

  • Arizona ($2.90)

  • Idaho ($2.86) 

  • Utah ($2.78)

  • Colorado ($2.75)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Louisiana ($2.25)

  • Mississippi ($2.26)

  • Texas ($2.27)

  • Alabama ($2.29)

  • South Carolina ($2.29)

  • Missouri ($2.29)

  • Arkansas ($2.30)

  • Virginia ($2.30)

  • Oklahoma ($2.30)

  • Tennessee ($2.32)

Motorists continue to see relatively stable fuel prices as the summer driving season passes farther in the rearview mirror.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey sh...
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Gas prices remain flat despite falling oil prices

Higher than normal demand has reduced fuel supplies

The price of crude oil has fallen over the last few weeks, but that hasn’t been a huge help to consumers at the gas pump. The price rose slightly over the last week as demand for fuel remained strong.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.65 a gallon, a penny more than last Friday. But it remains 22 cents a gallon cheaper than at this time a year ago. The average price of premium is $3.26, also a penny more than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is right at $3 a gallon, about where it was seven days ago.

While the national average hasn’t changed that much, prices around the nation cover an incredibly wide range. In several posts on Twitter, Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, reported that a station in Essex, Calif., is charging $6.24 a gallon for regular. Meanwhile, a station in Houston is selling it for $1.88 a gallon.

California’s supply problems over the last couple of weeks appear to have moved up the coast. Oregon’s statewide average price for regular is up eight cents a gallon in the last week, while the price is six cents higher in Washington.

Elsewhere, unseasonally strong demand for gasoline has put a strain on supplies and kept the price from falling very much in most regions. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that total U.S. gasoline supplies fell by 2.6 million barrels last week and are eight million barrels lower than at this time last year.

California’s average gasoline price remains significantly higher than the rest of the country and is 50 cents higher than the next most-expensive state, Hawaii. It’s $1.51 more than the national average price.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($4.16)

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • Nevada ($3.44)

  • Washington ($3.37) 

  • Oregon ($3.29) 

  • Alaska ($3.04)

  • Arizona ($2.91)

  • Utah ($2.75)

  • Idaho ($2.82) 

  • Illinois ($2.76)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • South Carolina ($2.30)

  • Louisiana ($2.26)

  • Mississippi ($2.27)

  • Texas ($2.30)

  • Alabama ($2.30)

  • South Carolina ($2.30)

  • Arkansas ($2.31)

  • Virginia ($2.32)

  • Missouri ($2.32)

  • Oklahoma ($2.33)

  • Tennessee ($2.35)

The price of crude oil has fallen over the last few weeks, but that hasn’t been a huge help to consumers at the gas pump. The price rose slightly over the...
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The price of gasoline fell slightly over the last week

But prices remain high in California and parts of the West

The price of gasoline drifted lower in the last week, though prices in several western states -- notably California -- moved higher.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.64, two cents lower than last Friday. That’s eight cents higher than a month ago. The average price of premium is $3.25 a gallon, about the same as last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.00 a gallon, a penny less than last week.

Drivers in California are feeling the most pain. After the previous week’s 31 cents a gallon surge, the average price at the pump in California this week is another three cents higher. The state has suffered from refinery bottlenecks that appear to have spread to other western states. The average price in Nevada is up seven cents a gallon and is six cents higher in Oregon.

Prices remain the cheapest in the Southeast, with South Carolina, Louisiana, and Mississippi coming in as the best places to fill up this weekend.

Prices normally go down at this time of year, but consumer demand remains high. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported Thursday that demand last week was 323,000 barrels a day more than the previous week. That drew down gasoline supplies by 1.2 million barrels.

Fortunately for consumers, oil prices have continued to decline this week as traders worry that the ongoing trade dispute with China will eventually push the world into a recession.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($4.18)

  • Hawaii ($3.67)

  • Nevada ($3.44)

  • Washington ($3.31)

  • Oregon ($3.21)

  • Alaska ($3.00)

  • Arizona ($2.91)

  • Utah ($2.77)

  • Idaho ($2.77)

  • Illinois ($2.75)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • South Carolina ($2.26)

  • Louisiana ($2.27)

  • Mississippi ($2.27)

  • Texas ($2.29)

  • Alabama ($2.30)

  • Arkansas ($2.31)

  • Virginia ($2.31)

  • Missouri ($2.31)

  • Oklahoma ($2.32)

  • Tennessee ($2.35)

The price of gasoline drifted lower in the last week, though prices in several western states -- notably California -- moved higher.The AAA Fuel Gauge...
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Gas prices surge in California

However, many other areas of the U.S. are catching a break at the gas pump

Despite a huge price spike in California, gasoline prices have remained relatively stable in the last week, recovering from a short-lived oil shock after Saudi Arabian oil fields were attacked last month.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.66 a gallon, roughly the same as a week ago. The price is only about nine cents a gallon higher than a month ago.

The average price of premium is $3.25 a gallon, up a penny since last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.01 a gallon, with no change in the last week.

The exceptions are in the Western states where lingering refinery issues have sent prices sharply higher. California motorists have seen the price of regular surge by an average of 31 cents a gallon in the last week.

Other western states have seen less severe price hikes. The average price of regular is up around 19 cents a gallon in Nevada over the last seven days.

Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, says a number of refinery issues choked off supplies in California over the last couple of weeks, causing prices to spike. But DeHaan tells ConsumerAffairs that relief is on the way, with prices expected to peak over the weekend. Even so, he says Southern California is seeing its highest prices since 2015 and Northern California has its highest prices at the pump since 2014.

While the West is seeing higher-than-normal prices, states in the Southeast experienced a slight drop in gasoline prices, with the cheapest prices today found in Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($4.15)

  • Hawaii ($3.68)

  • Nevada ($3.37)

  • Washington ($3.26)

  • Oregon ($3.14)

  • Alaska ($2.97)

  • Arizona ($2.92)

  • Utah ($2.79)

  • Illinois ($2.79)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.76)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Louisiana ($2.29)

  • Mississippi ($2.30)

  • South Carolina ($2.30)

  • Arkansas ($2.32)

  • Alabama ($2.32)

  • Texas ($2.33)

  • Virginia ($2.34)

  • Missouri ($2.34)

  • Tennessee ($2.36)

  • Oklahoma ($2.37)

Despite a huge price spike in California, gasoline prices have remained relatively stable in the last week, recovering from a short-lived oil shock after S...
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Gas price stability recovers two weeks after Saudi oil field attack

The exception is California, where prices at the pump have surged

Gasoline prices have leveled off after increases triggered by an attack on Saudi Arabian oil fields earlier this month. The exception is California, where prices are sharply higher due to refinery issues.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.65 a gallon, a penny less than a week ago. It’s seven cents higher than a month ago. The average price of premium gas is $3.24, up a penny in the last seven days. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.01 a gallon, two cents higher than last Friday.

California added to its lead as the most expensive state for gasoline, with the statewide average rising nearly 13 cents a gallon in the last week. Refinery bottlenecks have temporarily reduced available fuel supplies, causing prices to rise.

GasBuddy’s head of petroleum analysis, Patrick DeHaan, reported at mid-week that the price at the pump in some California markets was closing in on $4 a gallon. The price is moving in the other direction in Michigan, falling 11 cents a gallon in the last seven days.

Elsewhere, prices were mostly stable because gasoline stockpiles rose. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports domestic fuel supplies rose by 500,000 barrels last week, helped by a big increase in gasoline imports. The extra supply came in handy since consumer demand for gasoline rose slightly.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.84)

  • Hawaii ($3.68)

  • Washington ($3.21)

  • Nevada ($3.18)

  • Oregon ($3.07)

  • Alaska ($2.98)

  • Arizona ($2.91)

  • Utah ($2.81)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.79)

  • Illinois ($2.78)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.32)

  • Louisiana ($2.32)

  • Arkansas ($2.33)

  • Alabama ($2.34)

  • South Carolina ($2.34)

  • Virginia ($2.36)

  • Texas ($2.37)

  • Tennessee ($2.38)

  • Oklahoma ($2.38)

  • Missouri ($2.38)

Gasoline prices have leveled off after increases triggered by an attack on Saudi Arabian oil fields earlier this month. The exception is California, where...
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Gas prices level off after sharp increase following Saudi oil field attack

The average price is up about a dime a gallon in the last week

Less than a week after a drone attack on a huge Saudi Arabian oil field, prices at the pump have jumped and leveled off. At this point at least, it appears the damage to consumers could have been a lot worse.

The explosions and fires shut down half of Saudi oil production, reducing world oil output by 5 percent. The loss of oil production was felt quickly in world oil markets, with oil prices surging. But after the Saudis predicted full production would resume by the end of the month, oil prices fell again.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $2.67 a gallon, about a dime more than last Friday -- the day before the attacks. But the price is only five cents more than it was a month ago and well below last year’s price. The average price of premium is $3.24 a gallon, up eight cents in the last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.00 a gallon, seven cents higher than a week ago.

What’s next?

Where do prices go from here? Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, says prices could rise a few more cents a gallon. However, he notes that the situation remains in flux.

“The Saudis said they expect to get production back online sooner than what expectations were, and that helped,” DeHaan told ConsumerAffairs. “But but there's some worry now whether they can meet that. So that could be a changing impact on gasoline prices should there be a deviation.”

.And there’s something else, closer to home, that could keep gas prices rising. DeHaan says anticipated flooding in Houston could threaten to curtail refinery output, reducing supplies of gasoline. But he doesn’t think consumers will feel a huge price shock at this point.

“I don't think we'll see more than a dime rise, if that, from today unless these situations change from this moment,” DeHaan said.

There is one bright spot in the gasoline picture; demand from consumers is falling. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports demand for fuel dropped by 900,000 barrels a day last week, taking pressure off supplies.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.71)

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • Washington ($3.21)

  • Nevada ($3.16)

  • Oregon ($3.07)

  • Alaska ($2.98)

  • Arizona ($2.88)

  • Illinois ($2.85)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.81)

  • Michigan ($2.78)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.31)

  • Louisiana ($2.31)

  • Alabama ($2.22)

  • South Carolina ($2.33)

  • Arkansas ($2.35)

  • Tennessee ($2.39)

  • Texas ($2.38)

  • Virginia ($2.38)

  • Oklahoma ($2.38)

  • Missouri ($2.39)

Less than a week after a drone attack on a huge Saudi Arabian oil field, prices at the pump have jumped and leveled off. At this point at least, it appears...
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Attack on Saudi oil fields likely to raise U.S. gas prices

But the effect may not be that severe, expert says

A drone attack on a major Saudi Arabian oil facility over the weekend has put a major dent -- at least temporarily -- in world oil supplies.

Early reports indicate that the explosion and fires shut down half of Saudi oil production, reducing world oil output by 5 percent.  While there is no clear evidence pointing to who was behind the attacks, the loss of oil production should be felt quickly in world oil markets.

Crude oil closed Friday at just below $55 a barrel, but some experts believe prices will soar in the wake of the Saudi attacks. It was up 9 percent in early Monday trading. Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, says some price movement is likely, but its extent may have to wait until the facts are clearer.

“It may be limited due to the fact that Saudi Arabia has said that most of the affected production could be restored within a matter of days,” DeHaan told ConsumerAffairs. “If that turns out to be accurate, the impact to gas prices may be measured in a few cents per gallon.”

As much as 25 cents a gallon

On the other hand, if the damage is more severe than first reported, or if it takes longer to restore production, the average gas price could jump as much as 25 cents a gallon.

“The impact will likely not be felt at the pump until mid-week at earliest but could certainly grow quickly if the news from Saudi Arabia on restoration is bad,” DeHaan said.

The drone attack hit Saudi Aramco’s Abqaiq plant — one of the world’s largest oil processors — and also caused damage to a nearby oil field. Early reports said the damaged installations account for almost 10 million barrels of oil production. Removing that oil from the market will make the remaining oil on the global market more expensive.

‘A big deal’

MarketWatch quotes crude-oil strategist Phil Flynn at Price Futures Group as saying the loss of the Saudi oil is a “big deal,” but as DeHaan points out, it all depends on how long before that oil starts flowing again.

Chris Midgley, global head of analytics, S&P Global Platts, raises another point. He tells CNBC that oil prices may stay elevated to account for the potential risk of attacks on supplies.  

Saudi Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said Sunday that the damage had affected about 5.7 million barrels a day of oil and gas production. That would mean the attack has reduced Saudi oil output -- for the time being at least -- by around 50 percent.

The U.S. imports very little Saudi oil. However, American consumers will likely be affected because the loss of Saudi production will raise the price of oil produced everywhere, including in the U.S.

President Trump said he is authorizing the release of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to minimize supply disruptions in the U.S.

A drone attack on a major Saudi Arabian oil facility over the weekend has put a major dent -- at least temporarily -- in world oil supplies.Early repor...
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Gasoline prices remain remarkably stable over the last week

The late summer price decline appears to have stopped, at least for now

In spite of forecasts predicting falling gasoline prices into the end of summer, consumers in much of the nation saw little price movement over the last week. Prices were slightly higher in some states and slightly lower in others.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $2.57 a gallon, about the same as it was a week ago. Prices are still seven cents lower than a month ago. The average price of premium gas is $3.16 a gallon, also unchanged from seven days ago. The average price of diesel fuel remains unchanged from last Friday, at $2.92 a gallon.

While fuel prices remain a lot lower than at this time a year ago, consumers appear to be driving more. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports gasoline demand increased by 336,000 barrels a day in the previous week. The increase in demand has cut total gasoline supplies by around 700,000 barrels.

But downward price pressure may resume. In a tweet this week, Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, said refineries should start delivering winter-grade gasoline in a week or so, replacing more expensive summer blends.

“EPA requires summer gasoline through Sept. 15, so winter gasoline could theoretically show up as soon as Sept. 16, but it'll usually take a couple of weeks to hit,” he wrote.

Over the last week most states saw little to no change in fuel prices, but Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois were exceptions. Prices at the pump in those states showed bigger-than-average increases.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • California ($3.62)

  • Washington ($3.19)

  • Nevada ($3.10)

  • Oregon ($3.04)

  • Alaska ($2.98)

  • Arizona ($2.82)

  • Utah ($2.77)

  • Idaho ($2.77)

  • Illinois ($2.74)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.19)

  • Louisiana ($2.20)

  • Alabama ($2.22)

  • South Carolina ($2.23)

  • Arkansas ($2.24)

  • Tennessee ($2.27)

  • Missouri ($2.30)

  • Texas ($2.27)

  • Virginia ($2.28)

  • Oklahoma ($2.29)

In spite of forecasts predicting falling gasoline prices into the end of summer, consumers in much of the nation saw little price movement over the last we...
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Gas price decline slows as some states experience an increase

But the effects are expected to be temporary

While gasoline prices in most states continue to fall, increases in California, Florida, and South Carolina were the outliers.

AAA attributed the price hikes in Florida and South Carolina to the effects of Hurricane Dorian, a notion disputed by GasBuddy’s Patrick DeHaan, who said those states were simply caught in a price cycle.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.57 a gallon, a penny less than last Friday. That’s 14 cents less than a month ago. The average price of premium gas is $3.16, a penny less than last week. The price of diesel fuel is $2.92, also a penny lower over the last seven days.

In most other parts of the country, prices at the pump have continued a slow decline, based in large part on relatively low crude oil prices. Oil prices have remained low over the last month amid concerns about a slowing global economy.

“As an east coast storm, Hurricane Dorian is not threatening major oil and gas infrastructure so its impact is localized to its path along the East Coast,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “For the rest of the country, demand, which remains high, is chipping away at supply, but not at a high enough rate to increase gas prices.”

At the same time, refineries have begun to switch over to the production of winter-grade gasoline, which costs less than summer blends. AAA reports that the price of gas dropped by a dime a gallon in the nation’s capital this week, is down nine cents in Michigan, and is seven cents a gallon lower in Delaware.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • California ($3.63)

  • Washington ($3.20)

  • Nevada ($3.11)

  • Oregon ($3.04)

  • Alaska ($2.99)

  • Arizona ($2.82)

  • Utah ($2.80)

  • Idaho ($2.79)

  • New York ($2.75)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Louisiana ($2.18)

  • Mississippi ($2.18)

  • Alabama ($2.21)

  • South Carolina ($2.24)

  • Arkansas ($2.25)

  • Oklahoma ($2.27)

  • Tennessee ($2.27)

  • Missouri ($2.28)

  • Texas ($2.29)

  • Virginia ($2.29)

While gasoline prices in most states continue to fall, increases in California, Florida, and South Carolina were the outliers.AAA attributed the price...
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Falling gas prices may spur Labor Day weekend road trips

Gas prices are 25 cents a gallon less than last Labor Day weekend

In spite of continued strong fuel demand, consumers hitting the road over the Labor Day weekend can expect to find the lowest gasoline prices in three years.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.58 a gallon, two cents lower than last Friday. A year ago the price of gas averaged $2.83 a gallon. The average price of premium is $3.17 a gallon, two cents less than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.93 a gallon, a penny less than last week.

Gasoline prices continue to benefit from lower oil prices, with concerns about a slowing global economy keeping crude prices low. The price of oil is around $57 a barrel, and though it’s up for the week, it’s expected to go lower in the weeks ahead.

With the U.S. economy still humming -- the latest reading on economic growth is 2 percent -- motorists haven’t cut back on their fuel purchases. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports gasoline demand last week nearly hit 10 million barrels a day, up sharply from the previous week. Supplies of gasoline fell by more than two million barrels.

“While demand chips away at supply, it’s not at a high enough rate to significantly impact gas prices,” AAA said in its latest market update. “In fact, the national average is cheaper week-over-week by three-cents.”

Most states saw small declines in the price of gasoline during the week. Arizona was an exception, as prices at the pump jumped by five cents a gallon within that state. 

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • California ($3.57)

  • Washington ($3.20)

  • Nevada ($3.12)

  • Oregon ($3.04)

  • Alaska ($3.01)

  • Utah ($2.83)

  • Idaho ($2.81)

  • Arizona ($2.82)

  • New York ($2.78)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Louisiana ($2.19)

  • Mississippi ($2.20)

  • South Carolina ($2.23)

  • Alabama ($2.22)

  • Arkansas ($2.26)

  • Oklahoma ($2.29)

  • Tennessee ($2.28)

  • Texas ($2.30)

  • Missouri ($2.39)

  • Virginia ($2.32)

In spite of continued strong fuel demand, consumers hitting the road over the Labor Day weekend can expect to find the lowest gasoline prices in three year...
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AAA predicts a big drop in gasoline prices

The national average price drops another three cents a gallon in the last week

The price of gasoline continues to fall, and AAA predicts that we aren’t even close to the bottom. The organization has stated that prices could fall an average of 25 cents a gallon before the end of the year.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $2.59 a gallon, three cents below last Friday’s price. It’s down 23 cents a gallon from a year ago. The average price of premium is $3.19, down three cents from last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.94, a penny less than last week.

“AAA predicts that fall gasoline prices will be significantly less expensive than this summer with motorists finding savings in every market across the country,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “Many factors are driving this decrease, but the low price of crude oil is chief among them.”

Because of falling oil prices, driven by a slowdown in the global economy, AAA predicts the average price will drop another 25 cents a gallon before it reaches a bottom. The economic consequences could be significant since lower fuel prices are likely to promote travel and more consumer spending.

AAA forecasts crude prices to range between $50 and $60 per barrel this fall. That, along with a healthy refinery utilization rate, should keep downward pressure on prices at the pump through the end of the year.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • California ($3.58)

  • Washington ($3.22)

  • Nevada ($3.14)

  • Oregon ($3.06)

  • Alaska ($3.02)

  • Utah ($2.87)

  • Idaho ($2.83)

  • New York ($2.80)

  • Connecticut ($2.78)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Louisiana ($2.22)

  • Mississippi ($2.23)

  • South Carolina ($2.25)

  • Alabama ($2.25)

  • Arkansas ($2.28)

  • Oklahoma ($2.30)

  • Tennessee ($2.31)

  • Texas ($2.34)

  • Missouri ($2.32)

  • Virginia ($2.35)

The price of gasoline continues to fall, and AAA predicts that we aren’t even close to the bottom. The organization has stated that prices could fall an av...
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Gas prices still giving motorists a break at the pump

The national average price is down another five cents this week

The price of gasoline continues to fall across most the the U.S. as growing supplies create more competition.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline has fallen to $2.63 a gallon, five cents lower than last Friday. It’s down 16 cents in the last month. The average price of premium gras is $3.22 a gallon, down four cents in the last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.95, two cents lower in the last week.

Prices fell last week despite a huge increase in demand, suggesting motorists are driving more as the vacation season winds down. The latest report from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) shows demand for gasoline hit a new all-time high of 9.93 million barrels a day for the week ending August 9.

In fact, demand grew by nearly 300,000 barrels a day to hit the highest level recorded by EIA since it began recording that data in 1991. Demand is nearly 400,000 barrels a day higher than at this time last year.

“If demand increases amid falling stock levels in the week ahead, American motorists could see pump prices increase moderately ahead of Labor Day,” AAA said in its latest market update.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.65)

  • California ($3.60)

  • Washington ($3.24)

  • Nevada ($3.18)

  • Oregon ($3.09)

  • Alaska ($3.06)

  • Utah ($2.90)

  • Idaho ($2.86)

  • New York ($2.83)

  • Illinois ($2.82)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Louisiana ($2.25)

  • Mississippi ($2.27)

  • South Carolina ($2.29)

  • Alabama ($2.30)

  • Arkansas ($2.30)

  • Oklahoma ($2.34)

  • Tennessee ($2.35)

  • Texas ($2.37)

  • Missouri ($2.37)

  • Kansas ($2.39)

The price of gasoline continues to fall across most the the U.S. as growing supplies create more competition.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the nation...
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Gasoline prices are down another five cents a gallon

Oil continues to get cheaper, and that makes filling up less painful

A steep drop in world oil prices is putting downward pressure on gasoline prices, giving motorists cheaper fuel prices as the summer driving season winds down.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular has dropped to $2.67 a gallon, five cents lower than last Friday. That’s 19 cents less than a year ago.

The average price of premium is $3.26  a gallon, three cents less than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel, which has remained stable throughout the summer, is $2.97, a penny lower than last week.

In the short term, growing supplies of gasoline appear to be applying the most influence on gasoline prices. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) revealed that gasoline stocks grew by an astonishing 4.4 million barrels last week, as demand increased only slightly.

Going forward, Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, says falling oil prices are linked to the continuing U.S.-China trade battle. If trade tensions slow world economies, that will be felt at the gas pump.

“With such a slowdown, oil demand will also likely cave to the pressure, and that's why oil has plummeted,” DeHaan told ConsumerAffairs. “I think we're in store for the national average gas price to drop to its lowest of the summer in just a few days time, with more substantial relief in the weeks ahead and into the fall as gasoline demand drops further and we switch back to cheaper winter gasoline.”

DeHaan said it’s possible that the national average could be 50 cents per gallon lower than the summer peak of $2.81 by Thanksgiving if the trade standoff goes on. Most states saw slight declines in gasoline prices over the last seven days. The drop in Illinois was among the largest, at 10 cents a gallon.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.65)

  • Hawaii ($3.65)

  • Washington ($3.27)

  • Nevada ($3.21)

  • Oregon ($3.12)

  • Alaska ($3.12)

  • Utah ($2.92)

  • Idaho ($2.88)

  • Illinois ($2.86)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.86)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Louisiana ($2.31)

  • Mississippi ($2.32)

  • Alabama ($2.34)

  • Arkansas ($2.35)

  • South Carolina ($2.35)

  • Oklahoma ($2.40)

  • Tennessee ($2.41)

  • Texas ($2.42)

  • Missouri ($2.43)

  • Virginia ($2.44)

A steep drop in world oil prices is putting downward pressure on gasoline prices, giving motorists cheaper fuel prices as the summer driving season winds d...
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Falling oil prices provide consumers with a break at the gas pump

The national average price falls another three cents a gallon

Gasoline prices drifted lower during the week for the final stretch of the vacation and summer driving seasons.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the average price of regular gas is $2.72 a gallon, nearly three cents less than last week but the same as a month ago. Gas is 15 cents a gallon cheaper than at this time in 2018. The average price of premium gas is $3.29 a gallon, down from $3.32 last Friday. The price of diesel fuel is $2.98, a penny less than a week ago.

Gas prices are giving way under the pressure of falling oil prices. At the same time, consumers aren’t buying as much fuel, keeping supplies plentiful. The  Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports gasoline demand fell last week to 9.55 million barrels a day.

“Alongside a decline in gasoline demand, a cheaper crude price — ranging between $12-15 per barrel less when compared to last year — has helped American motorists to see lower pump prices this summer,” AAA said in its latest market update.

GasBuddy’s Patrick DeHaan predicts gasoline prices will continue to fall. In a tweet, DeHaan said falling oil prices will likely lead to lower gasoline prices in most of the country as summer draws to a close.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.68)

  • Hawaii ($3.65)

  • Washington ($3.28)

  • Nevada ($3.24)

  • Oregon ($3.14)

  • Alaska ($3.13)

  • Illinois ($2.96)

  • Idaho ($2.90)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.89)

  • Connecticut ($2.87)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.35)

  • Louisiana ($2.35)

  • Alabama ($2.36)

  • Arkansas ($2.38)

  • South Carolina ($2.39)

  • Oklahoma ($2.44)

  • Tennessee ($2.45)

  • Texas ($2.46)

  • Virginia ($2.47)

  • Missouri ($2.47)

Gasoline prices drifted lower during the week for the final stretch of the vacation and summer driving seasons.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the aver...
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Gas prices drop three cents in the last week

But volatile oil prices add some uncertainty to future prices at the pump

Gasoline prices dipped during the last week as Gulf Coast refineries got back to more normal operations after Tropical Storm Barry.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular dropped three cents a gallon to $2.75 a gallon. That’s a dime less than one year ago. The average price of premium is $3.32 a gallon, down three cents from a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.99 a gallon, a penny less than last week.

Prices appeared to be very stable during the week, with most states posting modest declines at the pump. However, Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, reported on Twitter that prices appeared to be rising in parts of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio.

Oil prices have been volatile over the past several weeks and now appear headed higher again on news that U.S. oil supplies fell sharply over the previous week. The American Petroleum Institute (API) reported a drop of 10.961 million barrels of U.S. stockpiles for the week ending July 18, much higher than industry analysts expected. 

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.69)

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • Washington ($3.30)

  • Nevada ($3.26)

  • Alaska ($3.17)

  • Oregon ($3.16)

  • Illinois ($3.02)

  • Idaho ($2.91)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.90)

  • Connecticut ($2.88)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.37)

  • Alabama ($2.40)

  • Louisiana ($2.38)

  • Arkansas ($2.41)

  • South Carolina ($2.43)

  • Oklahoma ($2.45)

  • Tennessee ($2.49)

  • Virginia ($2.50)

  • Texas ($2.50)

  • Kansas ($2.51)

Gasoline prices dipped during the last week as Gulf Coast refineries got back to more normal operations after Tropical Storm Barry.The AAA Fuel Gauge S...
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Gas prices rise may have peaked for the summer

The national average price is only a penny higher than last week

The price of gasoline rose again this week but still lags behind the price consumers were paying at the pump at this time a year ago.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the average price of regular gasoline is $2.78 a gallon, just a penny a gallon higher than last Friday. It rose four cents a gallon during the previous week. 

The average price of premium gas is $3.35 a gallon, three cents higher than seven days ago. The average price of diesel fuel is holding steady at $3 a gallon, remaining at that price over the last three weeks.

The biggest one-week price rise was in Missouri, where the average price surged by 11 cents a gallon in the last week. The average price was up seven cents in Texas; six cents in Illinois, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia; and five cents a gallon in Arkansas.

“Gas prices continue to increase for the majority of motorists east of the Mississippi,  while those filling up in the West Coast and Rockies regions are seeing a bit of a reprieve at the pump,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA’s spokesperson. “While the national average is up, only seven states have gas price averages of $3 a gallon or more. And notably, compared to the same time last year, the average is still eight cents cheaper.”

Oil prices have been somewhat volatile in recent weeks, adding to regional price spikes though prices appear to be headed lower again. Last week’s tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico reduced the flow of fuel from Gulf Coast refineries suggesting the recent rise in fuel prices could be temporary once these refineries are back at full strength.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.73)

  • Hawaii ($3.66)

  • Washington ($3.32)

  • Nevada ($3.27)

  • Alaska ($3.22)

  • Oregon ($3.19)

  • Illinois ($3.11)

  • Idaho ($2.93)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.93)

  • Connecticut ($2.90)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.40)

  • Alabama ($2.43)

  • Louisiana ($2.43)

  • Arkansas ($2.44)

  • South Carolina ($2.48)

  • Oklahoma ($2.51)

  • Virginia ($2.53)

  • Tennessee ($2.53)

  • Texas ($2.54)

  • Kansas ($2.55)

The price of gasoline rose again this week but still lags behind the price consumers were paying at the pump at this time a year ago.The AAA Fuel Gauge...
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Gasoline prices level off in the last week

But a storm brewing in the Gulf could lead to a spike

The recent rise in gasoline prices, sparked in part by an explosion and fire that shut down a Pennsylvania oil refinery last month, appears to have paused, at least for now.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.77 a gallon, up two cents from a week ago. It’s still 11 cents a gallon cheaper than one year ago.

The average price of premium gas is $3.32 a gallon, also the same as last week. The price of diesel fuel is also holding steady at last week’s price of $3 a gallon.

The respite from rising fuel prices may not last. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that demand is increasing while supplies are shrinking. Last week, total domestic stocks fell by 1.4 million barrels to 229.2 million barrels, below the supply level at this time last year.

“If stocks continue to decrease as demand remains robust, pump prices will likely remain higher,” AAA said in its latest market update. 

Another factor that could affect the short term price of gasoline is a sharp rise in crude oil prices. Oil futures hit a seven-week high of over $60 a barrel Thursday as a tropical storm threatened rigs in the Gulf of Mexico. At the same time, tensions between Iran and Britain put upward pressure on Brent crude prices.

While gasoline prices have remained mostly stable over the last seven days, the average price in California, the most expensive state, has declined two cents a gallon. The average price in Mississippi, the cheapest state, is a penny higher than last Friday.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.75)

  • Hawaii ($3.65)

  • Washington ($3.34)

  • Nevada ($3.29)

  • Alaska ($3.22)

  • Oregon ($3.20)

  • Illinois ($3.05)

  • Idaho ($2.95)

  • Utah ($2.91)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.90)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.36)

  • Alabama ($2.39)

  • Louisiana ($2.39)

  • Arkansas ($2.39)

  • South Carolina ($2.42)

  • Oklahoma ($2.45)

  • Missouri ($2.46)

  • Tennessee ($2.47)

  • Texas ($2.47)

  • Virginia ($2.47)

The recent rise in gasoline prices, sparked in part by an explosion and fire that shut down a Pennsylvania oil refinery last month, appears to have paused,...
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Independence Day holiday travelers will find higher gas prices

But prices at the pump are still lower than last Fourth of July

Consumers taking an Independence Day holiday road trip will find gas prices that are higher than a week ago, but they’re lower than last Fourth of July.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.74 a gallon, six cents higher than last week. Motorists were paying an average of $2.86 a gallon exactly a year ago.

The average price of premium is $3.31 a gallon, up six cents in the last seven days. Diesel fuel, on the other hand, has barely risen; it’s just a penny higher in the last week, at $3 a gallon. AAA reports that about 25 states have seen gas prices go up by at least 5 cents a gallon over the last week.

“For the more than 41 million motorists hitting the road this week to celebrate the Independence Day holiday, they will find gas prices cheaper than Memorial Day weekend, but more expensive than they’ve been paying the last few weeks,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA’s spokesperson. “It’s typical to see increases at the pump ahead of the holiday, but we may see prices continue to jump throughout the month due to refinery interruptions on the East Coast, increasing demand and fluctuations in crude oil price.”

In fact, the loss of a key refinery in Pennsylvania last month because of an explosion and fire is being felt across wide areas of the eastern U.S., which normally has some of the lowest gas prices in the nation. 

Mississippi still has the lowest average gas price in the nation but the price at the pump there has risen seven cents a gallon in the last seven days.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.77)

  • Hawaii ($3.64)

  • Washington ($3.35)

  • Nevada ($3.30)

  • Alaska ($3.26)

  • Oregon ($3.22)

  • Illinois ($3.04)

  • Idaho ($2.99)

  • Utah ($2.96)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.91)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.34)

  • Alabama ($2.36)

  • Louisiana ($2.37)

  • Arkansas ($2.37)

  • South Carolina ($2.39)

  • Oklahoma ($2.43)

  • Tennessee ($2.45)

  • Missouri ($2.45)

  • Texas ($2.46)

  • Virginia ($2.46)

Consumers taking an Independence Day holiday road trip will find gas prices that are higher than a week ago, but they’re lower than last Fourth of July....
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Gas prices are rising again

The East Coast is permanently losing a major refinery

Gasoline prices reversed their downward slide this week as summer demand picked up and supplies fell. Motorists hitting the road for next week’s Independence Day holiday may find lower prices in the west but more expensive fuel in the east and Midwest.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the average price of regular gas is $2.70 a gallon, four cents higher than last Friday. The price is still 15 cents lower than at this time a year ago. The average price of premium gas is $3.28 a gallon, three cents higher than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.99 a gallon, the same as seven days ago.

Last week’s explosion and fire at the Philadelphia Energy Solutions Refining Complex in South Philadelphia is likely to affect prices in the future. The company announced this week that it intends to permanently close the refinery, which had been processing more than 300,000 barrels of crude oil a day for PADD 1, the refinery region covering the East Coast of the U.S.

“This could result in PADD 1 becoming quite tight for gasoline supply,” Patrick DeHaan, head of Petroleum Analysis at GasBuddy, told ConsumerAffairs. “They're going to be reliant on imports of gasoline, mainly from Europe or the Gulf Coast. As a result, they could be subject to more pricing volatility in the months and years ahead.”

DeHaan said the loss of the refinery won’t always be felt directly, but during maintenance season and the run-up to summer, the East Coast may resemble the West Coast when it comes to price volatility.

The Midwest experienced the most volatility during the week. The average price of regular in Ohio surged nearly 20 cents a gallon. It’s up seven cents a gallon in Michigan.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.73)

  • Hawaii ($3.64)

  • Washington ($3.35)

  • Oregon ($3.35)

  • Nevada ($3.33)

  • Alaska ($3.27)

  • Idaho ($3.03)

  • Utah ($3.01)

  • Arizona ($2.90)

  • Illinois ($2.88)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.28)

  • Alabama ($2.30)

  • Louisiana ($2.31)

  • South Carolina ($2.32)

  • Arkansas ($2.33)

  • Oklahoma ($2.38)

  • Tennessee ($2.39)

  • Texas ($2.39)

  • Missouri ($2.39)

  • Virginia ($2.41)

Gasoline prices reversed their downward slide this week as summer demand picked up and supplies fell. Motorists hitting the road for next week’s Independen...
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Massive refinery fire could reverse the trend of falling gas prices

An explosion rocked the East Coast’s largest refinery before dawn on Friday

Consumers continued to enjoy falling gasoline prices this week, but an early morning explosion at an oil refinery near Philadelphia could reverse that trend.

A video posted to social media shows a massive explosion at the Philadelphia Energy Solutions Refining Complex in south Philadelphia shortly before dawn on Friday. The refinery is reportedly the largest on the East Coast, processing more than 300,000 barrels of crude oil a day.

The fire is likely to reduce the amount of gasoline that normally supplies the northeast region, sending gas prices higher. If so, it would reverse the trend of declining fuel.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.66 a gallon, down six cents from a week ago. The price is still 21 cents a gallon cheaper than at this time last year. The average price of premium gas is $3.25 a gallon, also five cents lower than last Friday. The price of diesel fuel is $3 a gallon, three cents lower than seven days ago.

Middle East tensions

In addition to the Philadelphia refinery fire, tensions in the Middle East could also send prices at the pump higher in the days ahead. Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, says Iran’s downing of a U.S. drone over the Persian Gulf this week could change things.

“The decline in gas prices may pause or slow in some places starting in the next few days, depending on any US response to Iran,” DeHaan said in a tweet.

Meanwhile, consumers are pumping more gasoline. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports demand hit a record last week -- 9.93 million barrels a day. AAA says that kind of demand normally pushes gas prices higher. But lower-than-normal oil prices over the last month have made it cheaper to produce fuel.

There’s a $1.52 swing between the highest average gasoline price this week and the lowest. California’s average price is the highest at $3.77 a gallon, though it’s dropped eight cents in the last week. Mississippi and South Carolina are tied for the lowest average price -- $2.25 a gallon.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.77)

  • Hawaii ($3.65)

  • Washington ($3.38)

  • Nevada ($3.38)

  • Alaska ($3.34)

  • Oregon ($3.25)

  • Idaho ($3.07)

  • Utah ($3.07)

  • Arizona ($2.95)

  • New York ($2.85)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.25)

  • South Carolina ($2.25)

  • Louisiana ($2.27)

  • Alabama ($2.27)

  • Arkansas ($2.33)

  • Oklahoma ($2.34)

  • Tennessee ($2.35)

  • Texas ($2.36)

  • Missouri ($2.40)

  • Virginia ($2.41)

Consumers continued to enjoy falling gasoline prices this week, but an early morning explosion at an oil refinery near Philadelphia could reverse that tren...
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Gas prices fall another seven cents in the last week

Prices at the pump are 12 cents a gallon lower since Memorial Day

A big drop in the price of crude oil is giving motorists a break at the gas pump as the summer driving season begins in earnest.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.70 a gallon, seven cents less than last Friday. It’s nearly 20 cents a gallon less than at this time last year.

The average price of premium has fallen six cents to $3.30 a gallon. The average price of diesel fuel is three cents less than last week, at $3.03 a gallon.

An attack on two tankers near the Persian Gulf this week caused oil prices to spike, but GasBuddy’s head of petroleum analysis, Patrick DeHaan, says the attacks will have no lasting effect on oil prices.

That’s due in part to growing domestic supplies of gasoline. The latest report from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) shows U.S. fuel supplies grew by nearly a million barrels last week and now sit at 234.9 million barrels. Even with increasing demand. AAA says that should keep prices at the pump stable.

“As the summer driving season gets underway, increased gas stocks will help to supply high demand and keep prices low,” AAA said in its latest market update.

Even though the price of gas in California has fallen sharply in the last two weeks there remains a wide spread between the most expensive and cheapest states when it comes to gasoline.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.85)

  • Hawaii ($3.65)

  • Washington ($3.44)

  • Nevada ($3.43)

  • Alaska ($3.42)

  • Oregon ($3.30)

  • Idaho ($3.13)

  • Utah ($3.12)

  • Arizona ($3.02)

  • New York ($2.88)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.30)

  • South Carolina ($2.32)

  • Louisiana ($2.33)

  • Alabama ($2.33)

  • Arkansas ($2.37)

  • Tennessee ($2.39)

  • Texas ($2.41)

  • Oklahoma ($2.42)

  • Missouri ($2.46)

  • Virginia ($2.46)

A big drop in the price of crude oil is giving motorists a break at the gas pump as the summer driving season begins in earnest. The AAA Fuel Gauge Sur...
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Gasoline prices drop five cents a gallon in the last week

California, the most expensive state, saw a seven cents per gallon decline

For consumers, the open road may beckon this summer as the price of gasoline continues to go down.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.77 a gallon, down five cents a gallon since last Friday. It’s 16 cents a gallon cheaper than at this time last year. The average price of premium is $3.35 a gallon, four cents cheaper than a week ago. The price of diesel fuel is $3.06 a gallon, two cents less than last week.

AAA issued its summer forecast on Thursday, predicting that the average price of regular would drop to $2.70 per gallon this summer. AAA’s Fuel Price Survey found consumers don’t think that price would be excessive. The survey showed the price at the pump would have to reach $3 a gallon before it would be considered too high.

Motorists in California, Hawaii, Washington, Alaska, Nevada, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, and Arizona are already paying in excess of that amount, although California saw the average price drop by seven cents. Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson, says filling up may feel less painful because the cost is significantly lower than last year.

“There is good news for consumers this summer – the highest prices of the year could be in the rearview mirror,” she said.

On Thursday, GasBuddy’s Patrick DeHaan reported that the lowest gas price in the nation was at a Sam’s Club in La Marque, Texas -- $1.94 a gallon.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.91)

  • Hawaii ($3.64)

  • Washington ($3.49)

  • Alaska ($3.48)

  • Nevada ($3.46)

  • Oregon ($3.36)

  • Idaho ($3.17)

  • Utah ($3.15)

  • Arizona ($3.10)

  • Illinois ($2.94)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Mississippi ($2.37)

  • Louisiana ($2.38)

  • Alabama ($2.38)

  • South Carolina ($2.40)

  • Arkansas ($2.43)

  • Texas ($2.45)

  • Oklahoma ($2.45)

  • Tennessee ($2.46)

  • Missouri ($2.51)

  • Virginia ($2.52)

For consumers, the open road may beckon this summer as the price of gasoline continues to go down.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average...
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Gas prices inched lower in the last week

California's average price dropped below $4 a gallon

Heading into the summer driving season, motorists are finding some relief at the gas pump. The price of fuel has slowly fallen through May and could be headed even lower.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.82 a gallon, down two cents in the last seven days. It’s 13 cents less than at this time a year ago. The average price of premium is $3.39, also two cents lower than last Friday. The price of diesel fuel is a penny less than last week, at $3.09 a gallon.

A few states saw the price of gas go up slightly in the last seven days, but most saw prices decline. AAA reports 42 states and Washington, D.C. have gas price averages that are less expensive year-over-year.

Florida has seen gas prices go down the most, with prices sitting 31 cents a gallon cheaper today than a year ago. In the last week, California motorists saw a hopeful milestone with the average price of regular falling below $4 a gallon for the first time in over a month.

“Gas prices have declined, on average, by at least a nickel, for the majority of the country since the beginning of May and that’s a trend motorists can expect to continue into early June,” said Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson.

Casselano credits stable crude oil prices for relief at the pump, noting that prices have gone down even though gasoline supplies remain tight and there’s no let-up in demand.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.98)

  • Hawaii ($3.65)

  • Washington ($3.53)

  • Alaska ($3.49)

  • Nevada ($3.47)

  • Oregon ($3.41)

  • Idaho ($3.19)

  • Utah ($3.17)

  • Arizona ($3.12)

  • Illinois ($2.98)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Louisiana ($2.42)

  • Mississippi ($2.42)

  • Alabama ($2.43)

  • South Carolina ($2.45)

  • Arkansas ($2.48)

  • Tennessee ($2.51)

  • Texas ($2.51)

  • Missouri ($2.54)

  • Virginia ($2.55)

  • Oklahoma ($2.57)

Heading into the summer driving season, motorists are finding some relief at the gas pump. The price of fuel has slowly fallen through May and could be hea...
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Memorial Day weekend gas prices are headed lower

An increase in supply is keeping price hikes at bay

Consumers hitting the road for the Memorial Day weekend may find slightly lower gasoline prices than a week ago.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.84, down nearly two cents from last Friday. That’s more than 11 cents less than at this time a year ago.

The average price of premium is $3.41, down about two cents from last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.10, less than a penny more than a week ago.

Gasoline prices nationwide have moderated in the last few weeks because consumer demand has softened. At 228.7 million barrels, total gasoline inventories in the U.S. are 5.2 million barrels less than they were in mid-May 2018. A big drop in U.S. gasoline exports led to the increase, which AAA says may not last.

China trade a factor

Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, says he thinks consumers could see more declines at the gas pump in the weeks ahead.

“Typically, June features mostly downward movement thanks to refineries boosting supply, having completed their maintenance,” DeHaan told ConsumerAffairs. “Obviously, we're watching the US-China trade deal. If there's a deal gas prices may rise, but for now things are mostly quiet and we are expecting more downward movement than upward.”

One reason gasoline stocks have risen is the U.S. has imported a lot more gasoline than usual, doubling imports to 1.35 million barrels a day. Even so, AAA says increased gasoline stocks amid robust summer demand may help to keep prices at the pump from rising.

This week price movement state-to-state was minor. Some starts registered a small price increase while others saw a very small price decline.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($4.02)

  • Hawaii ($3.64)

  • Washington ($3.54)

  • Nevada ($3.48)

  • Alaska ($3.47)

  • Oregon ($3.43)

  • Idaho ($3.20)

  • Utah ($3.19)

  • Arizona ($3.14)

  • Pennsylvania ($3.00)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Alabama ($2.45)

  • Louisiana ($2.45)

  • Mississippi ($2.45)

  • South Carolina ($2.48)

  • Arkansas ($2.50)

  • Tennessee ($2.54)

  • Missouri ($2.54)

  • Texas ($2.56)

  • Oklahoma ($2.57)

  • Virginia ($2.58)

Consumers hitting the road for the Memorial Day weekend may find slightly lower gasoline prices than a week ago.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the nat...
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It’s not yet Memorial Day, but gas prices are already falling

Motorists haven’t filled up as much over the last couple of weeks

The spring rise in gasoline prices usually peaks on Memorial Day weekend, but prices appear to be falling a week early this year.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.86 per gallon, down nearly two cents in the last seven days. It’s four cents cheaper than at this time a year ago.

The average price of premium gas is $2.43, down a penny from last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.09, also a penny lower than last week.

The principal reason for the early drop in prices at the pump is a significant decline in consumer demand. Motorists simply aren’t filling up as often as they did in the late winter and early spring. The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) latest market report showed demand for gasoline dropped to 9.1 million barrels a day last week, a consumption level most likely to be seen during the fall or winter.

Gasoline demand was down 800,000 barrels a day from the previous week and 400,000 barrels a day lower than this time last year. In fact, a reading this low hasn’t been seen for early May since 2015. Analysts attribute part of the decline to nasty weather in the Rockies and Midwest that may have kept some motorists at home.

While prices continued their slow decline, there were some notable exceptions. The average price rose four cents a gallon in Utah and Idaho. Three states -- Alabama, Louisiana, and South Carolina -- are tied for the lowest average price in the nation.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($4.05)

  • Hawaii ($3.64)

  • Washington ($3.54)

  • Oregon ($3.43)

  • Nevada ($3.49)

  • Alaska ($3.46)

  • Utah ($3.20)

  • Idaho ($3.20)

  • Arizona ($3.15)

  • Pennsylvania ($3.01)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Alabama ($2.47)

  • Louisiana ($2.47)

  • South Carolina ($2.47)

  • Mississippi ($2.48)

  • Arkansas ($2.52)

  • Tennessee ($2.55)

  • Missouri ($2.56)

  • Oklahoma ($2.56)

  • Texas ($2.57)

  • Virginia ($2.59)

The spring rise in gasoline prices usually peaks on Memorial Day weekend, but prices appear to be falling a week early this year.The AAA Fuel Gauge Sur...
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Gas prices may have peaked for the season

The average price declined in more than half the states this week

Gasoline prices actually dipped during the last week, but it’s too soon to tell whether they’ll fall further.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $2.87 a gallon, down two cents from a week ago. The price is only two cents more than at this time a year ago. The average price of premium is $3.44 a gallon, the same as last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.10 a gallon, also the same as it was seven days ago.

Prices normally don’t peak until Memorial Day weekend, so it appears this week’s leveling off, felt almost nationwide, is simply an early start. Refinery maintenance has mostly been completed and the switchover to summer fuel blends has begun.

On the other hand, AAA notes that crude oil inventories declined last week, which could boost oil prices in the short term.

“If total crude stocks continue to tighten, American motorists will likely see pump prices continue to increase this spring – alongside the global price of crude as tightening supply amid robust global crude demand will increase the price per barrel of oil,” AAA said in its latest market update.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($4.09)

  • Hawaii ($3.65)

  • Washington ($3.53)

  • Oregon ($3.43)

  • Nevada ($3.49)

  • Alaska ($3.43)

  • Arizona ($3.16)

  • Utah ($3.16)

  • Idaho ($3.16)

  • Pennsylvania ($3.04)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Alabama ($2.50)

  • Mississippi ($2.51)

  • Louisiana ($2.51)

  • South Carolina ($2.52)

  • Arkansas ($2.55)

  • Missouri ($2.59)

  • Oklahoma ($2.59)

  • Tennessee ($2.59)

  • Texas ($2.59)

  • Virginia ($2.62)

Gasoline prices actually dipped during the last week, but it’s too soon to tell whether they’ll fall further.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the nation...
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Gas prices level off in the last week

The average price is just eight cents a gallon more than a year ago

The price of gasoline appears to have stabilized in the last week, with only minimal increases in most states and a slight decline in others.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.89 a gallon, just a penny more than seven days ago. The average price is only a few cents more than at this time last year. The average price of premium is $3.45 a gallon, two cents more than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.10 a gallon, just a penny higher than seven days ago.

The unexpected stability in prices at the pump comes just a week after the U.S. withdrew waivers for countries to import Iranian oil, a move that reduced the world supply of oil and sent crude prices higher.

“Compared to the beginning of this year, motorists have definitely felt an increasing squeeze on their wallets at the pump,” said Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson. “These increases mean Americans are having to work more to afford to fill up their gas tanks.”

But a huge spike in crude oil inventories in the previous week probably had a moderating effect on pump prices this week. The Energy Information Administration reports oil supplies rose to 470.6 million barrels, nearly 35 million barrels more than at this time last year.

AAA says growing domestic crude stocks could play a role in helping to keep gas prices low this summer, since crude comprises roughly 50 percent of the cost consumers pay for fuel.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($4.09)

  • Hawaii ($3.64)

  • Washington ($3.52)

  • Oregon ($3.41)

  • Nevada ($3.46)

  • Alaska ($3.41)

  • Arizona ($3.14)

  • Pennsylvania ($3.05)

  • Utah ($3.06)

  • Idaho ($3.07)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Alabama ($2.51)

  • Mississippi ($2.53)

  • Louisiana ($2.54)

  • South Carolina ($2.55)

  • Arkansas ($2.56)

  • Missouri ($2.58)

  • Oklahoma ($2.61)

  • Tennessee ($2.61)

  • Texas ($2.62)

  • Virginia ($2.64)

The price of gasoline appears to have stabilized in the last week, with only minimal increases in most states and a slight decline in others.The AAA Fu...
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Average gas price now just 12 cents away from $3 a gallon

Stronger than normal spring demand keeps pushing pump prices higher

Consumers are driving more this spring, and that extra demand has reduced supplies of gasoline and kept prices moving higher. But in all but a few states, the increase this week was minimal.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $2.88 a gallon, up five cents a gallon from last Friday. It’s nine cents higher than at this time last year.

The average price of premium is $3.42, four cents higher than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.08, just a penny more than seven days ago.

Expect higher prices

The Energy Information Administration reports total supplies of gasoline fell by 2.2 million barrels in the previous week, 11 million barrels lower than domestic stocks at this time in 2018. Refineries’ switchover to summer-blend gasoline is reaching its peak, further reducing supplies.

“As a result, American motorists should expect increased pump prices as demand remains robust and stocks dwindle,” AAA said in its latest market update.

Crude oil to make gasoline is also rising in price, mainly due to OPEC and its partners agreeing on a 1.2 million barrel-per-day production cut. At the same time, the U.S. government is tightening enforcement of its crude export sanctions on Iran, removing more of that country’s oil from the world market.

California continues to have the most expensive gasoline by a wide margin, but the increase in the last week was only two cents a gallon. On the other hand, the average price jumped 10 cents a gallon in Alaska and rose eight cents in Nevada.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($4.04)

  • Hawaii ($3.63)

  • Washington ($3.49)

  • Oregon ($3.39)

  • Nevada ($3.38)

  • Alaska ($3.33)

  • Arizona ($3.08)

  • Pennsylvania ($3.04)

  • Illinois ($2.99)

  • Idaho ($2.99)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Alabama ($2.51)

  • Mississippi ($2.53)

  • Louisiana ($2.55)

  • Arkansas ($2.56)

  • South Carolina ($2.56)

  • Missouri ($2.59)

  • Texas ($2.62)

  • Tennessee ($2.62)

  • Virginia ($2.63)

  • Oklahoma ($2.63)

Consumers are driving more this spring, and that extra demand has reduced supplies of gasoline and kept prices moving higher. But in all but a few states,...
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Gas prices are still rising, but at a slower pace

The exception is California where motorists are paying more than $4 a gallon

The price of gasoline has not stopped going up, but at least it’s not going up as fast.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the average price of regular has risen three cents a gallon to $2.83 in the last week. That follows a nine cent rise during the previous seven days.

The average price of premium is $3.39 a gallon, six cents higher than the previous Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.07 a gallon, two cents higher than last week.

Prices have begun to moderate ahead of their expected peak around Memorial Day weekend, but the exception is in California. The average price of regular gas in the Golden State is $4.02 a gallon -- the only state to cross that $4 benchmark. The price is up 10 cents a gallon in the last week and has risen 68 cents over the last month.

According to AAA, the price spike has been caused by both the planned and unexpected maintenance in the state’s oil refineries.

“Out of California’s 10 refineries, six have seen a reduction in refined products output, including gasoline, due to maintenance upgrades and necessary repairs,” AAA said in its latest market update.

At the same time, refineries are switching over to the production of summer-grade gasoline, which is more expensive than winter blends. Currently, there is a 52 cents a gallon difference between California’s average gas price and the average price in Alabama, the cheapest state.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($4.02)

  • Hawaii ($3.60)

  • Washington ($3.44)

  • Oregon ($3.34)

  • Nevada ($3.30)

  • Alaska ($3.23)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.98)

  • Arizona ($3.01)

  • Illinois ($2.95)

  • Idaho ($2.86)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Alabama ($2.50)

  • Mississippi ($2.52)

  • Arkansas ($2.53)

  • South Carolina ($2.53)

  • Louisiana ($2.54)

  • Texas ($2.58)

  • Virginia ($2.58)

  • Missouri ($2.59)

  • Oklahoma ($2.60)

  • Tennessee ($2.61)

The price of gasoline has not stopped going up, but at least it’s not going up as fast.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the average price of regular has...
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Heavy gasoline demand drives prices higher

The average price jumped 9 cents a gallon in the last week

Gasoline demand has been rising so far this spring -- and it shot up to summer-like level last week, pushing prices at the pump higher.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline in $2.81 a gallon, up nine cents since last Friday. That’s 33 cents more than a month ago.

The average price of premium is $3.35 a gallon, eight cents higher than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.05, only two cents higher over the last seven days.

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports consumer demand for gasoline jumped last week to 9.8 million barrels a day, a huge increase over the previous week and about a half-million more barrels a day than the first week of April 2018.

California alone is doing more than its part to raise the national average for fuel prices. Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, says gas stations in the Los Angeles and San Francisco markets now average $4 a gallon for regular while the statewide average has risen to $3.95 a gallon, up 25 cents in the last seven days.

“It’s the first time since 2015 LA has seen such a high average,” DeHaan said in a tweet.

California isn’t the only state to see dramatic increases in gas prices over the last week. The average price is up 13 cents a gallon in Nevada, 11 cents in Utah, and eight cents in Arizona. AAA says shrinking gasoline supplies amid high demand will likely contribute to increased pump prices in the weeks ahead.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.95)

  • Hawaii ($3.54)

  • Washington ($3.32)

  • Oregon ($3.22)

  • Nevada ($3.16)

  • Alaska ($3.10)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.93)

  • Arizona ($2.93)

  • Illinois ($2.88)

  • Michigan ($2.86)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Alabama ($2.47)

  • Arkansas ($2.48)

  • Mississippi ($2.48)

  • South Carolina ($2.49)

  • Louisiana ($2.52)

  • Texas ($2.53)

  • Virginia ($2.54)

  • Missouri ($2.55)

  • Tennessee ($2.56)

  • Oklahoma ($2.56)

Gasoline demand has been rising so far this spring -- and it shot up to summer-like level last week, pushing prices at the pump higher.The AAA Fuel Gau...
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Falling refinery output sends gas prices higher in the last week

The average price of regular is now 29 cents a gallon more than a month ago

Unplanned maintenance at key oil refineries have reduced the flow of gasoline, and fuel supplies continue to shrink. As a result, gasoline prices continued to rise in the last week.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.72 a gallon, up four cents in the last week. It’s risen 29 cents in the last month.

The price of premium is $3.27 a gallon, five cents higher than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.03 a gallon, just a penny more than last week.

Prices normally rise at this time of year, but they’re getting a boost from the nation’s oil refineries, which aren’t turning out as much fuel as they normally do. Thursday’s report from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) shows refineries are operating at about 86 percent. Normal utilization at this time of year is 93 percent.

Marathon’s 383,000 barrel a day Carson facility in California and the 200,000 barrel a day McKee refinery in West Texas are both undergoing unscheduled work, sending California gasoline prices soaring. Five other western states -- Hawaii, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and Nevada -- all have statewide average gasoline prices above $3 a gallon.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.70)

  • Hawaii ($3.50)

  • Washington ($3.23)

  • Oregon ($3.13)

  • Nevada ($3.03)

  • Alaska ($3.01)

  • Illinois ($2.88)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.86)

  • Michigan ($2.85)

  • Arizona ($2.85)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Alabama ($2.43)

  • Arkansas ($2.44)

  • Mississippi ($2.44)

  • Louisiana ($2.45)

  • South Carolina ($2.47)

  • Missouri ($2.47)

  • Utah ($2.48)

  • Virginia ($2.49)

  • Oklahoma ($2.50)

  • Texas ($2.48)

Unplanned maintenance at key oil refineries have reduced the flow of gasoline, and fuel supplies continue to shrink. As a result, gasoline prices continued...
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Gas prices surge in the last week

But the average price is only slightly higher than at this time last year

Gasoline prices jumped by 10 cents or more a gallon in several states in the last seven days as rising oil prices and cuts in gasoline production have reduced supplies. But prices are still about the same as they were at this time last year.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.69 a gallon, up eight cents from a week ago.

The average price of premium gas is $3.22 a gallon, up a dime from last Friday. The price of diesel fuel is $3.02, only a penny higher than last week.

The price at the pump went up in nearly every state but the biggest increase was in California, where the statewide average rose 17 cents a gallon, mainly due to refinery issues. The average price is up 12 cents in Ohio and 11 cents in Illinois.

Despite the higher prices consumers appear undeterred. The latest AAA Gas Price Survey found a third of consumers will probably take a road trip this summer with 27 percent suggesting they would take a longer trip than they did last year.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.56)

  • Hawaii ($3.42)

  • Washington ($3.12)

  • Oregon ($3.02)

  • Nevada ($2.93)

  • Alaska ($2.90)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.80)

  • Michigan ($2.82)

  • Illinois ($2.83)

  • Florida ($2.76)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Utah ($2.37)

  • Alabama ($2.41)

  • Arkansas ($2.42)

  • Mississippi ($2.43)

  • Virginia ($2.44)

  • Louisiana ($2.45)

  • South Carolina ($2.45)

  • Oklahoma ($2.46)

  • Wyoming ($2.46)

  • Texas ($2.47)

Gasoline prices jumped by 10 cents or more a gallon in several states in the last seven days as rising oil prices and cuts in gasoline production have redu...
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Gas prices are up again this week

Consumers are doing more driving now that spring has arrived

Rising consumer demand and spring refinery maintenance continue to push gasoline prices higher.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.61 a gallon, up another eight cents since last Friday. It’s running about the same as a year ago.

The average price of premium is $3.14 a gallon, seven cents higher than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.01 a gallon, about the same as last week.

With the arrival of spring, consumers are driving more. The latest report from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) shows motorists are buying about 9.4 million barrels of fuel a day, up 85,000 barrels a day from last year’s rate.

That increase in demand is drawing down gasoline stocks, which dipped by 4.6 million barrels last week, according to EIA.

“Since early February, gasoline demand has been steadily increasing while stocks have been gradually decreasing, causing more expensive pump prices across the country,” said Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson. “The good news is that most motorists are not paying more than they were a year ago to fill up.”

Several states saw significant price increases in the last week. Drivers in Michigan saw the average price for regular surge 11 cents a gallon. The average price in Missouri rose a dime a gallon. The average price jumped nine cents in Colorado.

There’s probably not much relief in sight since most refineries are beginning annual maintenance, which typically reduces output and in some cases causes a supply crunch.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.39)

  • Hawaii ($3.37)

  • Washington ($3.00)

  • Oregon ($2.89)

  • Nevada ($2.87)

  • Alaska ($2.83)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.77)

  • Michigan ($2.74)

  • Illinois ($2.72)

  • New York ($2.68)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Utah ($2.32)

  • Arkansas ($2.33)

  • Mississippi ($2.33)

  • Alabama ($2.33)

  • Louisiana ($2.35)

  • South Carolina ($2.36)

  • Wyoming ($2.37)

  • Texas ($2.38)

  • Tennessee ($2.38)

  • Missouri ($2.39)

Rising consumer demand and spring refinery maintenance continue to push gasoline prices higher.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average pri...
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Gas prices gain upward speed in the last week

The national average price of regular has risen seven cents

Spring is approaching -- and with it, higher gasoline prices. Supplies were down again last week while demand was up.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.53 a gallon, seven cents higher than last Friday. It’s almost exactly the same price as a year ago at this time. The average price of premium is $3.06, also seven cents a gallon higher than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.01, just a penny higher than a week ago.

Prices are moving higher as refineries curtail operations for annual maintenance. Over the next few weeks, they’ll begin the switch to production of summer blends, which will also reduce output.

Meanwhile, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports motorists are driving more. Last week, demand rose by more than 9 million barrels a day, which drained the domestic supply by 4.6 million barrels.

“As demand strengthens and gas stocks tighten, pump prices will likely follow suit and continue to increase,” AAA said in its latest market update. “Since Monday, the national average for unleaded regular gas has increased a nickel.”

In the last week, several states saw large price increases. Illinois and Michigan moved into the top 10 states with the highest gas prices. The statewide average jumped 14 cents a gallon in both states.

Patrick DeHaan, GasBuddy’s head of petroleum analysis, reports that the average price has risen 34 cents per gallon in Minnesota over the last month and is 32 cents a gallon higher in Illinois and Iowa.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.34)

  • California ($3.33)

  • Washington ($2.93)

  • Nevada ($2.85)

  • Oregon ($2.83)

  • Alaska ($2.82)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.70)

  • Illinois ($2.63)

  • New York ($2.62)

  • Michigan ($2.62)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Arkansas ($2.28)

  • Missouri ($2.30)

  • Mississippi ($2.26)

  • South Carolina ($2.29)

  • Alabama ($2.27)

  • Texas ($2.29)

  • Utah ($2.29)

  • Louisiana ($2.30)

  • Virginia ($2.31)

  • Colorado ($2.31)

Spring is approaching -- and with it, higher gasoline prices. Supplies were down again last week while demand was up.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows th...
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Gas prices continue their march higher

Prices are climbing at an orderly pace, matching the increase from two weeks ago

Gasoline prices rose again in the last week, but the price action, for the most part, has been smooth without huge spikes that sometimes occur this time of year.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.46 a gallon, up four cents since last Friday. But even though prices are moving higher, the average price is still eight cents less than a year ago.

The average price of both premium gas and diesel fuel is $3 a gallon, up four cents for premium and two cents for diesel.

Gasoline prices are responding to two catalysts: supplies continue to tighten and refineries are beginning to slow down to perform maintenance and prepare for the switchover to summer fuel blends. The March to Memorial Day period each year is marked by rising fuel prices.

After building up during early February, gasoline supplies are now falling as motorists make more trips to the gas pump. The Energy Information Administration reports total gasoline supplies fell by 4.2 million barrels in the previous week. At the same time, demand for gasoline picked up last week, growing by nearly 100,000 barrels a day from the previous week.

“As the nation begins to exit the winter driving season, motorists should expect pump prices to continue rising if demand increases and stocks of gasoline diminish,” AAA said in its latest market update.

Among the most significant price movements during the week, the average price fell three cents a gallon in Kansas but rose six cents in Oklahoma.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.33)

  • California ($3.30)

  • Washington ($2.89)

  • Nevada ($2.84)

  • Alaska ($2.80)

  • Oregon ($2.78)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.66)

  • New York ($2.56)

  • Connecticut ($2.52)

  • Michigan ($2.48)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.18)

  • Arkansas ($2.20)

  • South Carolina ($2.20)

  • Mississippi ($2.20)

  • Texas ($2.20)

  • Louisiana ($2.22)

  • Virginia ($2.23)

  • Alabama ($2.24)

  • Colorado ($2.25)

  • Utah ($2.25)

Gasoline prices rose again in the last week, but the price action, for the most part, has been smooth without huge spikes that sometimes occur this time of...
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Gasoline prices rise four cents a gallon in the last week

Once again, low-price states see the biggest gains

Winter is coming to an end, with refineries preparing for annual maintenance and the switch-over to summer grade blends. When that happens, fuel prices always rise.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.42 a gallon, up four cents in the last seven days. That’s 16 cents higher than a month ago but 12 cents lower than at this point in 2018.

The average price of premium gas is $2.97 a gallon, up three cents in the last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.98, two cents higher than last Friday.

The average price of fuel barely budged in Hawaii and California, the two states with the most expensive gasoline. At the same time, states in the Southeast that routinely enjoy low prices at the pump are continuing to see the price rise.

Alabama, one of two states with the lowest gas prices last week, experienced a 12 cents a gallon increase in the last week. Florida became one of the 10 most expensive states to buy gas in this week thanks to a 14 cents a gallon increase.

The gasoline market is being pressured by output reductions at refineries, as well as rising oil prices. Crude oil spiked this week after the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported a big one-week drop in U.S. supplies, mainly because U.S. producers have increased exports.

Despite rising oil prices, AAA’s Jeanette Casselano says crude is still cheaper than it was in the first two months of last year.

“Even though pump prices are on the rise, the increase has been countered by mostly decreasing demand, leading to the majority of people still paying less than $2.50 a gallon,” she said.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.29)

  • California ($3.28)

  • Washington ($2.86)

  • Nevada ($2.83)

  • Alaska ($2.80)

  • Oregon ($2.74)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.64)

  • New York ($2.52)

  • Connecticut ($2.50)

  • Florida($2.48)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Arkansas ($2.15)

  • Missouri ($2.15)

  • South Carolina ($2.16)

  • Mississippi ($2.16)

  • Colorado ($2.17)

  • Texas ($2.18)

  • Oklahoma ($2.20)

  • Virginia ($2.19)

  • Louisiana ($2.19)

  • Utah ($2.20)

Winter is coming to an end, with refineries preparing for annual maintenance and the switch-over to summer grade blends. When that happens, fuel prices alw...
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Gas prices jump nine cents a gallon in the last week

States with the cheapest gas saw the biggest increase

Consumers who had grown accustomed to low and stable gasoline prices over the last four months got a jolt in the last week.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the average price of regular gas surged nine cents a gallon in the last seven days, to $2.38 a gallon. It’s 13 cents higher than a month ago but still lower when compared to last year.

The average price of premium gas is up eight cents to $2.94 a gallon, and the price of diesel fuel is up only four cents a gallon, to $2.95.

It was in states where gasoline is normally the cheapest that prices rose the most. In just seven days, the statewide average rose 14 cents a gallon in South Carolina and Texas, 13 cents a gallon in Kansas, and 11 cents a gallon in Alabama and Mississippi.

States where gasoline is usually the most expensive bucked the trend and remained mostly stable. The average price in Hawaii actually went down a penny, making California the most expensive state for fuel in the last week.

“Motorists are seeing more expensive gas prices as a result of ongoing refinery problems coupled with crude oil prices hitting their highest level so far this year as global crude inventories tighten,” said Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson. “Inventories are likely to continue to tighten and keep gas prices higher through the end of the month.”

But it remains to be seen whether the pace of last week’s price hikes can be maintained. The latest report from the Energy Information Administration shows demand for fuel dropped for a second week. But because consumers are buying less gasoline, refineries have stepped up their exports.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.27)

  • Hawaii ($3.26)

  • Washington ($2.86)

  • Nevada ($2.84)

  • Alaska ($2.81)

  • Oregon ($2.74)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.59)

  • New York ($2.51)

  • Connecticut ($2.47)

  • Michigan ($2.46)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Alabama ($2.09)

  • Mississippi ($2.09)

  • Louisiana ($2.10)

  • Arkansas ($2.10)

  • Missouri ($2.11)

  • Texas ($2.12)

  • Colorado ($2.12)

  • Oklahoma ($2.15)

  • Kansas ($2.15)

  • South Carolina ($2.15)

Consumers who had grown accustomed to low and stable gasoline prices over the last four months got a jolt in the last week.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey sh...
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Gas prices hold steady over the last seven days

A steep drop in demand kept prices at the pump stable

Motorists continue to enjoy relatively low gasoline prices, but price increases could be just around the corner.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.29 a gallon, a penny more than last Friday. That’s about 27 cents less than at this time last year.

The average price of premium gas is unchanged from last week at $2.86 a gallon. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.92 a gallon, also unchanged from last week. One reason gas prices have remained stable is a drop in demand. Cold weather may have played a role in that.

“For two weeks, demand numbers have been decreasing,” AAA said in its latest market update. ‘The latest Energy Information Administration data reveals that gas demand fell by approximately 425,000 barrels a day from the previous week to 8.6 million barrels a day.” This latest rate is down by more than 400,000 barrels a day when compared to last year at this time.

On Twitter, Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, reported prices have begun to lurch higher in the Great Lakes region.

“We'll likely see the national average rise to its highest in a few months before tapering off slightly in the days ahead,” he wrote.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.27)

  • California ($3.26)

  • Washington ($2.87)

  • Nevada ($2.84)

  • Alaska ($2.82)

  • Oregon ($2.75)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.50)

  • New York ($2.46)

  • Connecticut ($2.45)

  • Arizona ($2.44)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($2.00)

  • Arkansas ($1.97)

  • Oklahoma ($2.02)

  • Alabama ($1.98)

  • Mississippi ($1.98)

  • Texas ($1.98)

  • Kansas ($2.02)

  • South Carolina ($2.01)

  • Louisiana ($2.02)

  • Colorado ($2.03)

Motorists continue to enjoy relatively low gasoline prices, but price increases could be just around the corner.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the nat...
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Despite rising oil prices, gasoline prices remained stable in the last week

The national average increased just three cents a gallon

Gasoline prices rose slightly over the last week but remain remarkably stable amid fluctuating oil prices.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.28 a gallon, up two cents over the last seven days. Prices have risen only five cents a gallon over the last month.

The average price of premium gas is $2.86 a gallon, two cents more than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.92 a gallon, the same as last Friday.

The numbers on fuel supplies from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) have been up and down since early January, making it difficult to get a fix of the state of the market. U.S. oil production has risen sharply in 2019, but gasoline demand has been up one week and down the next.

Two weeks ago, gasoline demand was at mid-summer levels. But the EIA reports that demand went down again last week, heading off supply problems that can cause gasoline prices to spike. Despite increases in U.S. production, oil prices continue to creep higher. OPEC has pledged to cut production while the U.S. has imposed sanctions on oil from Venezuela.

“In the weeks ahead, rising crude prices will likely increase pump prices for motorists across the country since the price per barrel of crude comprises approximately 50 percent of the cost consumers pay at the pump,” AAA said in its latest market update.

Some states have seen sharp price hikes in the last week. The average price is up 20 cents a gallon in Michigan and is 17 cents a gallon higher in Ohio.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.26)

  • California ($3.26)

  • Washington ($2.87)

  • Alaska ($2.86)

  • Nevada ($2.85)

  • Oregon ($2.76)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.49)

  • New York ($2.48)

  • Arizona ($2.46)

  • Connecticut ($2.46)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.93)

  • Arkansas ($1.95)

  • Oklahoma ($1.96)

  • Alabama ($1.97)

  • Mississippi ($1.97)

  • Texas ($1.98)

  • Kansas ($1.99)

  • South Carolina ($1.99)

  • Louisiana ($2.00)

  • Tennessee ($2.04)

Gasoline prices rose slightly over the last week but remain remarkably stable amid fluctuating oil prices.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national...
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Gas prices dip slightly this week

But a spike in demand may send them higher in the days ahead

Maybe it’s all those motorists in the Midwest and Northeast driving south to escape the polar vortex, but something has caused a huge spike in gasoline demand.

The increase in demand to summer levels will likely lead to higher gas prices by next week, but this week prices have actually fallen. The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.26 a gallon, down one cent from last Friday.

The average price of premium is $2.84 a gallon, a penny less than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.92 a gallon, the same as the last two Fridays. But the price stability might not last.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports consumers increased their demand for gasoline last week to 9.6 barrels a day. Consumers are using 700,000 barrels a day more than the previous week, putting demand at what AAA calls normal for an average week at the height of summer.

“One reason for the jump could be the weather caused motorists to fill-up and stock-pile ahead of the storms,” AAA said in its latest market update. “Despite the increase in demand, high levels of gasoline stocks may keep average pump prices in check.”

Gasoline prices normally rise in late winter as refineries curtail operations for annual maintenance and begin the switch-over to summer grade fuel. Patrick DeHaan, GasBuddy’s head of petroleum analysis, reports on Twitter that several refineries slowed operations this week because of extreme cold.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.26)

  • California ($3.22)

  • Washington ($2.90)

  • Alaska ($2.88)

  • Nevada ($2.86)

  • Oregon ($2.78)

  • Arizona ($2.49)

  • Connecticut ($2.49)

  • New York ($2.49)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.47)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.90)

  • Oklahoma ($1.93)

  • Mississippi ($1.96)

  • Kansas ($1.96)

  • Texas ($1.97)

  • Alabama ($1.98)

  • South Carolina ($1.99)

  • Louisiana ($2.01)

  • Tennessee ($2.04)

  • Virginia ($2.06)

Maybe it’s all those motorists in the Midwest and Northeast driving south to escape the polar vortex, but something has caused a huge spike in gasoline dem...
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Gasoline prices have begun to creep higher

But a surge in supply may keep further price increases in check

As predicted, gasoline prices have begun to rise. However, they remain lower than they were a month ago and are considerably cheaper than a year ago.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.27 a gallon, up three cents from last Friday. That price is 29 cents less than at this time in 2018. The average price of premium gas is $2.85 a gallon, two cents higher than a week ago. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.92, the same as last week.

Prices may continue climbing in the weeks ahead, but the rise may turn out to be slower than usual. The latest report from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) shows gasoline demand rose by 200,000 barrels in the last week. While that would normally push prices higher, the same report shows U.S. stockpiles of gasoline actually grew during the week.

In fact, gasoline supplies swelled by 4 million barrels, the biggest increase since EIA began keeping records in 1990.

“Increased levels of gasoline stocks could help to meet rising demand, which means the impact to pump prices could be modest,” AAA said in its latest market update.

Lower oil prices

Also helping consumers is the fear of a global economic slowdown, which has weighed down oil prices. Refineries don’t have to pay as much for crude oil, and that tends to keep prices lower.

As we saw last week, prices continue to slide in the states with the most expensive gas, but they are rising in states where fuel is normally the cheapest. Only two states, Hawaii and California, have average gas prices above $3 a gallon.

Ohio, meanwhile, fell out of the top 10 states with the cheapest gas with an 18 cent a gallon one week surge in its statewide average price.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.26)

  • California ($3.26)

  • Washington ($2.93)

  • Alaska ($2.90)

  • Nevada ($2.87)

  • Oregon ($2.82)

  • Arizona ($2.53)

  • Connecticut ($2.52)

  • New York ($2.52)

  • Pennsylvania ($2.49)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.90)

  • Oklahoma ($1.95)

  • Mississippi ($1.97)

  • Alabama ($1.98)

  • Kansas ($1.98)

  • Texas ($1.99)

  • Louisiana ($1.99)

  • South Carolina ($2.00)

  • Virginia ($2.06)

  • Tennessee ($2.06)

As predicted, gasoline prices have begun to rise. However, they remain lower than they were a month ago and are considerably cheaper than a year ago.Th...
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Gas prices bottom and could be headed higher

Prices rose this week in states with the lowest prices

Motorists have enjoyed relatively low prices at the pump for the last six weeks, but this may be as good as it gets. There are signs that prices could be headed higher in February.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.24 a gallon, a penny more than last Friday. Prices continued to fall in the western states with the most expensive gas, but in the states with the cheapest fuel, prices went up in the last seven days.

The average price of premium gas is also up a penny a gallon to $2.83 while the price of diesel fuel is two cents lower at $2.92 a gallon.

One sign that prices may have bottomed, at least for the time being, is price action in the various states. Prices are still going down in the western states where gas prices are highest. However, prices have begun to rise in southeastern states, where gas prices are lowest.

Supply and demand

While gas prices usually begin to creep higher in late winter, consumers should be spared any dramatic rise thanks to the laws of supply and demand. The Energy Information Administration reports U.S. gasoline supplies grew by 7.5 million barrels in the previous week because consumers aren’t using as much gasoline.

“If demand remains seasonally low amid continued growth in gasoline stocks across the country, American motorists may see pump prices remain low for the remainder of winter,” AAA said in its latest market update. “However, increasing crude prices could push pump prices higher.”

But so far there’s no sign of that happening. A big increase in U.S. oil production is keeping U.S. oil prices below $55 a barrel.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.27)

  • California ($3.26)

  • Washington ($2.96)

  • Alaska ($2.95)

  • Oregon ($2.85)

  • Nevada ($2.89)

  • Arizona ($2.56)

  • Connecticut ($2.53)

  • New York ($2.53)

  • Utah ($2.46)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.89)

  • Alabama ($1.93)

  • Oklahoma ($1.93)

  • Texas ($1.93)

  • Mississippi ($1.94)

  • South Carolina ($1.96)

  • Louisiana ($1.97)

  • Kansas ($1.97)

  • Ohio ($1.97)

  • Tennessee ($2.00)

Motorists have enjoyed relatively low prices at the pump for the last six weeks, but this may be as good as it gets. There are signs that prices could be h...
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Gas prices still falling but at a much slower rate

California replaces Hawaii as the most expensive state to fill up

Consumers continue to enjoy lower gasoline prices, but the rate of decline has slowed from the last couple of weeks and appears to have stalled.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.24 a gallon, just a penny lower than last Friday. It’s 27 cents cheaper than a year ago. The average price of premium is $2.83 a gallon, down two cents from last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.94, four cents less than seven days ago.

The week’s biggest declines came in states with the highest prices at the pump. California replaced Hawaii as the state with the highest statewide average gas price. At the same time, some of the states with the lowest prices saw their statewide averages actually go up. Prices in Oklahoma and South Carolina are both up a penny per gallon over last week.

Ordinarily, that might signal prices have reached a bottom, but a report from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) raises the possibility that prices could slide further in the weeks ahead.

The report shows U.S. supplies of gasoline surged by 8.1 million barrels last week, meaning the U.S. has nearly 11 million barrels more of motor fuel than at this time last year. According to AAA, consumers are buying less gas than forecasted. If that trend continues, AAA predicts motorists could see even lower prices at the pump throughout the winter.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • California ($3.29)
  • Hawaii ($3.28)
  • Washington ($3.01)
  • Alaska ($2.98)
  • Oregon ($2.89)
  • Nevada ($2.91)
  • Arizona ($2.61)
  • Connecticut ($2.56)
  • New York ($2.56)
  • Utah ($2.52)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.86)
  • Alabama ($1.90)
  • Oklahoma ($1.92)
  • Mississippi ($1.92)
  • Texas ($1.92)
  • Louisiana ($1.92)
  • South Carolina ($1.93)
  • Kansas ($1.96)
  • Tennessee ($1.97)
  • Ohio ($1.97)
Consumers continue to enjoy lower gasoline prices, but the rate of decline has slowed from the last couple of weeks and appears to have stalled.The AAA...
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Gas prices start 2019 by continuing December’s decline

Falling oil prices are putting more money in consumers’ pockets

With economic concerns sending oil prices tumbling, motorists are continuing to get a break at the gas pump. Prices fell once again in December and are still going down in January.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.25 a gallon, down three cents from last Friday. It’s 13 cents lower than a year ago.

The average price of premium is also down five cents from last week, at $2.84 a gallon. The price of diesel fuel has finally fallen below $3 a gallon, to $2.98.

Government figures about oil supplies are in short supply due to the government shutdown, but the oil market is flashing signals of a global economic slowdown. Crude oil is trading below $47 a barrel, meaning refiners are producing motor fuel for less.

Nationwide trend

Falling prices have been fairly uniform across the country. Hawaii is still the most expensive state for gasoline, but it’s now tied with California thanks to that state’s hefty gasoline tax.

Ohio has seen a large drop in gas prices thanks to a gas war in some parts of the state. At the start of the week, GasBuddy’s head of petroleum analysis, Patrick DeHaan, reported that five stations in Columbus were selling regular for $1.49 a gallon. The statewide average in Ohio is down nine cents a gallon in the last seven days.

Elsewhere, price dips have been more moderate. Missouri retains the title of cheapest gas with a statewide average of $1.82 a gallon, four cents cheaper than last week. Eleven states now have average gas prices under $2 a gallon. Only four states have an average price over $3.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.34)
  • California ($3.34)
  • Washington ($3.07)
  • Alaska ($3.05)
  • Oregon ($2.93)
  • Nevada ($2.92)
  • Arizona ($2.65)
  • Connecticut ($2.60)
  • New York ($2.60)
  • Utah ($2.58)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.83)
  • Oklahoma ($1.91)
  • South Carolina ($1.92)
  • Alabama ($1.92)
  • Texas ($1.92)
  • Mississippi ($1.93)
  • Ohio ($1.93)
  • Louisiana ($1.94)
  • Kansas ($1.94)
With economic concerns sending oil prices tumbling, motorists are continuing to get a break at the gas pump. Prices fell once again in December and are sti...
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Gas prices still dropping ahead of 2019

Falling prices at the pump are putting more money in consumers’ pockets

Consumers may find it easier to pay their holiday shopping bills in January because they’ll be spending less for gasoline.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.29 a gallon, down seven cents a gallon from last Friday. The price marks a 2018 low. The average price of premium gas is six cents lower than a week ago, at $2.89 a gallon. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.01 a gallon, down four cents from last week.

Nine of the 10 lowest-priced states have an average gas price below $2 a gallon. AAA reports that in 83 of the last 90 days, the national average price of fuel has gone down. However, that trend might not last.

“All eyes are on OPEC to kick off the year,” said Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson. “Many are waiting to see if they stick to their promise to cut crude production by 1.2-million b/d and if the proposed cuts will be enough to restore balance to the market.”

If OPEC cuts production, it could increase the price of oil, which has dropped to its lowest point in more than three years. Lower oil prices reduce costs for refiners, and the savings eventually get passed along to consumers.

Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, reports that 32 percent of the states have gas prices below $2 a gallon. He says 1 percent are selling gas below $1.75 a gallon.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.40)
  • California ($3.38)
  • Washington ($3.13)
  • Alaska ($3.06)
  • Nevada ($2.95)
  • Oregon ($2.90)
  • Arizona ($2.68)
  • Utah ($2.63)
  • Connecticut ($2.64)
  • New York ($2.64)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.87)
  • Oklahoma ($1.95)
  • South Carolina ($1.96)
  • Alabama ($1.97)
  • Texas ($1.97)
  • Mississippi ($1.97)
  • Louisiana ($1.98)
  • Kansas ($1.98)
  • Iowa ($2.00)
Consumers may find it easier to pay their holiday shopping bills in January because they’ll be spending less for gasoline.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey sho...
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Christmas gasoline prices are at a two-year low

Falling oil prices are giving motorists a holiday gift

Motorists hitting the road over the Christmas holiday will get the gift of lower gasoline prices, as prices at the pump have fallen to another 2018 low.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $2.35 a gallon, four cents lower than last Friday. It’s eight cents lower than at this time a year ago.

The price of premium is $2.94 a gallon, also down four cents in the last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.04 a gallon, down from $3.08 a week ago.

Falling gasoline prices are largely a byproduct of the oil market, which has seen oil prices slide below $50 a barrel. The Energy Information Administration reports U.S. crude oil supplies declined slightly for the third straight week, but so far it hasn’t affected the price.

At $2.35, the holiday gas prices are the cheapest consumers have seen during December since  2016. GasBuddy’s head of petroleum analysis, Patrick DeHaan, reports the national average price is the lowest since August 2016. He says 31 states have at least one station selling gasoline below $2 a gallon.

“AAA expects 102 million Americans to drive to their holiday destination this year, which is a four percent increase year-over-year,” said Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson. “No doubt cheaper gas prices are fueling their decision to hit the road.”

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.47)

  • California ($3.41)

  • Washington ($3.15)

  • Alaska ($3.09)

  • Oregon ($3.00)

  • Nevada ($2.99)

  • Wyoming ($2.70)

  • Arizona ($2.70)

  • Utah ($2.69)

  • Idaho ($2.67)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The survey found these states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas:

  • Missouri ($1.92)

  • Oklahoma ($2.01)

  • South Carolina ($2.01)

  • Alabama ($2.01)

  • Texas ($2.01)

  • Mississippi ($2.01)

  • Louisiana ($2.03)

  • Kansas ($2.03)

  • Tennessee ($2.07)

Motorists hitting the road over the Christmas holiday will get the gift of lower gasoline prices, as prices at the pump have fallen to another 2018 low....
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Gas prices fell to a new 2018 low this week

But the low prices may not last very long in 2019

Gas prices are giving consumers a Christmas bonus heading into the holidays, as it costs less to fill up this week than last week. In fact, gasoline prices have hit another low for 2018.

The national average price of regular gasoline is $2.39 a gallon, five cents less than last week and six cents lower than this time a year ago.

The average price of premium gas is under $3 a gallon for the first time this year, falling four cents to $2.98 a gallon. The price of diesel fuel is $3.09 a gallon, also four cents less than last Friday.

Weak oil prices are giving motorists a break at the pump, with crude oil prices hovering just above the $50 a barrel mark. Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson, says month-over-month statewide gas price averages have fallen by double digits in every state so far in December.

“For some in the Great Lakes and Central states of Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, and Missouri, state gas prices are as much as 40-cents less than they were in November,” she said. “In some states, gas prices are nearing $2 per gallon – something that hasn’t been seen since December 2017.”

AAA expects the average gas price to remain well below $2.40 gallon into the end of the year, but the low prices might not last much beyond that. The Energy Information Administration reports U.S. oil supplies declined for a second straight week last week after building up a huge inventory over the previous weeks.

With inventories falling, AAA said it expects tighter supplies will boost oil prices in early 2019, which in turn will make gasoline more expensive.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.56)

  • California ($3.41)

  • Washington ($3.19)

  • Alaska ($3.11)

  • Nevada ($3.05)

  • Oregon ($3.02)

  • Idaho ($2.79)

  • Utah ($2.78)

  • Wyoming ($2.77)

  • Arizona ($2.73)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found:

  • Missouri ($1.97)

  • Oklahoma ($2.04)

  • South Carolina ($2.04)

  • Alabama ($2.06)

  • Texas ($2.07)

  • Louisiana ($2.07)

  • Kansas ($2.08)

  • Mississippi ($2.09)

  • Ohio ($2.12)

  • Iowa ($2.13)

Gas prices are giving consumers a Christmas bonus heading into the holidays, as it costs less to fill up this week than last week. In fact, gasoline prices...
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Gas prices are lower than at this time last year

It's been 18 months since that was true

Gas prices continue to fall, but the cheapest fuel has now moved to the nation's heartland, leaving higher-than-normal prices in the Southeast. For the first time this year, motorists in Kansas and Iowa are enjoying some of the lowest prices in the nation.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $2.43 a gallon, the cheapest it's been all year. The price is six cents lower than a week ago and is now below the average price of one year ago.

The average price of premium gas is $3.03 a gallon, also six cents lower than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.12 a gallon, five cents lower than last week.

“Cheap crude oil prices are driving fuel savings at the pump,” said Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson. “Last week, crude dropped to its lowest point of the year at $50 a barrel. However, this week’s Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) meeting could cause crude oil prices to jump if the organization decides to reduce crude production.”

Tiny Delaware has the cheapest average gas price of any Mid-Atlantic state, and its annual decline in gas prices is the third largest in the U.S. It also has the third largest year-over-year difference in pump prices in the country -- 18 cents a gallon.

Some of the biggest price declines during the week occurred in states with the highest prices. Even Hawaii, which remains the most expensive state for gasoline, saw prices drop this week by 11 cents a gallon.

At the same time, some Midwestern states saw fuel prices go up this week. The average price of regular is up three cents a gallon in the last week in both Ohio and Michigan. It's four cents higher in Kentucky.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.61)
  • California ($3.48)
  • Washington ($3.26)
  • Alaska ($3.18)
  • Nevada ($3.11)
  • Oregon ($3.09)
  • Idaho ($2.86)
  • Utah ($2.84)
  • Wyoming ($2.82)
  • Arizona ($2.77)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found:

  • Missouri ($2.01)
  • Oklahoma ($2.08)
  • South Carolina ($2.08)
  • Texas ($2.10)
  • Alabama ($2.11)
  • Kansas ($2.12)
  • Mississippi ($2.12)
  • Louisiana ($2.13)
  • Iowa ($2.17)
  • Delaware ($2.18)
Gas prices continue to fall, but the cheapest fuel has now moved to the nation's heartland, leaving higher-than-normal prices in the Southeast. For the fir...
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Gas prices close to a 2018 low

Falling oil prices giving motorists a holiday gift

Motorists will go into December with a little extra Christmas cash in their pockets thanks to still-falling gasoline prices.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.51 a gallon, down seven cents from a week ago. It's 29 cents a gallon cheaper than a month ago, saving $4.35 on a 15-gallon fill-up.

The average price of premium gas is $3.10 a gallon, also seven cents cheaper than last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.21, three cents a gallon cheaper than seven days ago.

Gas prices are moving lower for one simple reason. The price of oil continues to fall, thanks to rising production and falling demand.

Building stockpiles

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports U.S. oil supplies rose for a 10th straight week, increasing to 450 million barrels. This week's EIA report shows oil stockpiles are about 7 percent higher than the five-year average for this time of year.

“Growth in global crude production, including in the U.S., combined with weaker than expected global crude demand for the fourth quarter have helped to push crude prices lower,” AAA said in its latest market update.

At $2.51 a gallon, the average price of gasoline is now just two cents higher than the lowest price of the year, reached back in January. Kentucky and Ohio saw the biggest price drops in the last week. The average price is down 10 cents a gallon in Kentucky and 14 cents lower in Ohio.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.72)
  • California ($3.56)
  • Washington ($3.32)
  • Alaska ($3.26)
  • Nevada ($3.17)
  • Oregon ($3.15)
  • Idaho ($2.95)
  • Utah ($2.89)
  • Wyoming ($2.86)
  • Arizona ($2.82)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found:

  • Missouri ($2.13)
  • Oklahoma ($2.18)
  • South Carolina ($2.18)
  • Texas ($2.19)
  • Ohio ($2.20)
  • Louisiana ($2.21)
  • Alabama ($2.21)
  • Delaware ($2.21)
  • Mississippi ($2.21)
  • Kentucky ($2.22)
Motorists will go into December with a little extra Christmas cash in their pockets thanks to still-falling gasoline prices.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey s...
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Gas prices fall at a faster rate over the last week

Falling demand pushed the average price down six cents

Holiday shoppers should have a little more money in their pockets this month because they're spending less on gasoline. The combination of soft oil prices and week gasoline demand provided some relief at the gas pump this week.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.72 a gallon, down six cents from last Friday and 18 cents cheaper than a month ago.

The average price of premium gas is $3.29 a gallon, also down six cents in the last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.26, down two cents from seven days ago.

AAA says the winter lull in gasoline demand appears to be arriving sooner than expected. The U.S. Energy Information Administration reports that gasoline demand fell to 9.1 million barrels a day last week, down 160,000 from the previous week. It was down 400,000 barrels a day from the same week in 2017.

Prices could go lower

"If demand continues to trend at this rate or drops even lower, American motorists will likely see gas prices continue to fall," AAA said in its latest market update.

Both the high-priced West Coast and low-priced Southeast markets saw declines in gasoline prices, but one of the biggest turnarounds occurred in the Midwest. In Ohio, the statewide average price of regular plunged 11 cents a gallon in the last seven days, making it the eighth-cheapest state for fuel.

But gasoline prices could be headed higher in neighboring Michigan. GasBuddy's Patrick DeHaan says Michigan Governor-elect Gretchen Whitmer has signaled support for raising the state's gasoline tax.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.91)

  • California ($3.73)

  • Washington ($3.49)

  • Alaska ($3.36)

  • Oregon ($3.31)

  • Nevada ($3.26)

  • Idaho ($3.09)

  • Utah ($2.99)

  • Montana ($2.95)

  • Connecticut ($2.94)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found:

  • Missouri ($2.42)

  • South Carolina ($2.43)

  • Oklahoma ($2.44)

  • Texas ($2.44)

  • Louisiana ($2.45)

  • Alabama ($2.46)

  • Mississippi ($2.47)

  • Ohio ($2.47)

  • Arkansas ($2.48)

  • Virginia ($2.49)

Holiday shoppers should have a little more money in their pockets this month because they're spending less on gasoline. The combination of soft oil prices...
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Falling oil prices are keeping gas prices in check

U.S. oil supplies are growing ahead of next week's Iran sanctions

A big drop in oil prices in the latter half of October is making gasoline cheaper for motorists as November gets underway.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.78 a gallon, down from $2.83 a gallon last week. However, it's still 30 cents a gallon more than a year ago.

The average price of premium gas is $3.35, down four cents a gallon from last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.28, just a penny cheaper than a week ago.

Prices normally drift lower late in the year, but the recent drop has been aided by a significant drop in the price of oil, as global demand is slowing and U.S. stockpiles are growing.

In its weekly report, the Energy Information Administration reported oil inventories increased last week for the sixth straight week with American suppliers adding 3.2 million barrels to their tanks. It's the highest level of U.S. oil supplies since mid-June.

But in its weekly market update, AAA cautions that supplies could dip as early as next week when new Iranian economic sanctions take effect and Iranian oil will be withheld from the market.

In the last week, prices varied widely state to state. Some states in the West saw a small bit of relief, as the statewide average fell four cents a gallon in California. States in the Southeast saw the biggest price drops as a handful of states saw prices go down five cents or more.

Prices went up in some Great Lakes states, but GasBuddy petroleum analyst Patrick DeHaan advised on Twitter that drivers there should be patient.

"Do not be in a rush to fill up, wait if you can," he wrote. "Looks like average prices could go even lower in the next week or so than they were earlier this week."

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.90)
  • California ($3.77)
  • Washington ($3.52)
  • Alaska ($3.39)
  • Oregon ($3.35)
  • Nevada ($3.28)
  • Idaho ($3.12)
  • Utah ($3.02)
  • Montana ($2.98)
  • Connecticut ($2.97)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found:

  • South Carolina ($2.48)
  • Missouri ($2.49)
  • Texas ($2.51)
  • Mississippi ($2.52)
  • Alabama ($2.52)
  • Louisiana ($2.52)
  • Oklahoma ($2.53)
  • Arkansas ($2.54)
  • Virginia ($2.55)
  • Tennessee ($2.57)
A big drop in oil prices in the latter half of October is making gasoline cheaper for motorists as November gets underway.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey sho...
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Gas prices fall further as oil stockpiles grow

Motorists may benefit from slowing global demand

Motorists on the West Coast have experienced generally higher gasoline prices this week while prices have fallen all across the Southeast.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $2.83 a gallon, down three cents from last week. It's just a penny cheaper than a month ago.

The average price of premium gas is $3.39 a gallon, down three cents from last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.29, the same as last week.

While scattered refinery and delivery issues have caused prices to rise in some western states, the overall trend is falling fuel prices. On Thursday, the Energy Information Administration reported another increase in U.S. oil stockpiles, the fifth straight week supplies have risen.

"Continued growth in domestic crude bbl held in storage will likely cause prices to decline temporarily," AAA reported in its market update. "However, with pending U.S.-imposed sanctions on Iran’s crude exports set to go into effect on November 4, lower crude prices may be short-lived as global supply tightens – amid robust global crude demand – later this fall."

The only thing that might keep oil prices low is a prolonged drop in demand. Crude oil prices are down sharply from the start of the week to $66 a barrel after Saudi Arabia warned traders that an oil glut may be reforming. Meanwhile, U.S. motorists are benefiting.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.90)
  • California ($3.81)
  • Washington ($3.53)
  • Alaska ($3.39)
  • Oregon ($3.37)
  • Idaho ($3.13)
  • Nevada ($3.29)
  • Pennsylvania ($3.02)
  • Utah ($3.01)
  • Montana ($3.00)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found:

  • South Carolina ($2.55)
  • Mississippi ($2.56)
  • Missouri ($2.56)
  • Alabama ($2.58)
  • Louisiana ($2.58)
  • Texas ($2.58)
  • Arkansas ($2.59)
  • Ohio ($2.60)
  • Oklahoma ($2.60)
  • Virginia ($2.60)
Motorists on the West Coast have experienced generally higher gasoline prices this week while prices have fallen all across the Southeast.The AAA Fuel...
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Gas prices finally begin to fall

Midwestern states are seeing the biggest drop

After an unusual post-summer surge over the last few weeks, gasoline prices have finally begun to back off to normal levels.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.86 a gallon, down four cents from a week ago. It's still three cents higher than a month ago. The average price of premium gas is $3.42 a gallon, down three cents from last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.29 a gallon, the same a last week.

Prices are lower due to falling demand, and the future could see even lower prices, at least in the short run. That's because U.S. oil supplies are increasing. The Energy Information Administration reports U.S. Crude stockpiles grew by 6.5 million barrels last week, hitting 416 million barrels.

“The larger-than-expected growth in crude levels jolted the market, which had seen prices steadily rising due to concerns about U.S.-Saudi Arabia relations and upcoming U.S.-imposed sanctions on Iran’s crude exports,” AAA said in a market update. “With continued worries about global crude supply and demand this fall, more growth in total crude inventories could reduce concerns and push crude prices lower in the coming weeks if the trend continues.”

The biggest drop in prices at the pump this week occurred in the Midwest. In Ohio, the average price plunged by 15 cents a gallon. It's down by 10 cents in Indiana and is eight cents lower in Kentucky.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.90)
  • California ($3.81)
  • Washington ($3.54)
  • Alaska ($3.39)
  • Oregon ($3.38)
  • Idaho ($3.11)
  • Nevada ($3.29)
  • Pennsylvania ($3.05)
  • Michigan ($3.02)
  • Montana ($3.01)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found:

  • South Carolina ($2.59)
  • Mississippi ($2.60)
  • Alabama ($2.61)
  • Louisiana ($2.63)
  • Ohio ($2.62)
  • Missouri ($2.62)
  • Arkansas ($2.63)
  • Texas ($2.63)
  • Oklahoma ($2.65)
  • Virginia ($2.65)
After an unusual post-summer surge over the last few weeks, gasoline prices have finally begun to back off to normal levels.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey s...
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Gas prices make a surprising surge

The national average price jumped four cents a gallon in the last week

Gasoline prices are at the highest level for the beginning of October since 2014. They’re also higher than during most of the summer driving season.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.91 a gallon, four cents higher than a week ago. It's eight cents higher than a month ago.

The average price of premium fuel is $3.44 a gallon, up three cents from last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.24 a gallon, five cents higher than last week.

Prices are rising while demand is at relatively low levels. The Energy Information Administration says demand posted a modest increase over the unseasonably low of 8.9 million barrels a day for the week ending September 21.

Rising oil prices

The culprit appears to be the price of oil. Crude prices dipped Thursday after hitting a four-year high earlier in the week. Traders bid up the price of petroleum ahead of sanctions on Iran that will reduce the flow of that country's oil.

As a result, prices at the pump rose in nearly every state this week, more in some states than others. In California the statewide average gained a dime a gallon in the last seven days. Motorists in Nevada saw their average price rise a nickel a gallon.

Gas prices range from $3.82 a gallon in Hawaii to $2.60 in Alabama, Mississippi, and South Carolina.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.82)
  • California ($3.78)
  • Washington ($3.41)
  • Alaska ($3.34)
  • Oregon ($3.27)
  • Idaho ($3.14)
  • Nevada ($3.25)
  • Utah ($3.04)
  • Pennsylvania ($3.07)
  • Michigan ($3.03)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found:

  • Alabama ($2.60)
  • Mississippi ($2.60)
  • South Carolina ($2.60)
  • Louisiana ($2.65)
  • Virginia ($2.65)
  • Arkansas ($2.65)
  • Texas ($2.65)
  • Tennessee ($2.67)
  • Missouri ($2.69)
  • North Carolina ($2.73)
Gasoline prices are at the highest level for the beginning of October since 2014. They’re also higher than during most of the summer driving season.The...
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Fall doesn't bring the expected drop in gas prices

Refinery issues a boost in prices in a handful of states

At a time when they should be falling, gasoline prices are on the rise. In a move that surprised many industry analysts, prices at the pump made significant moves in several states.

Normally at this time of year, gasoline prices begin falling because refineries have switched over the cheaper winter-grade fuel blends.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.87, up two cents from last Friday. It's four cents higher than it was a month ago, at the tail end of the summer driving season.

The average price of premium gas is $3.41 a gallon, up two cents from last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.19, a penny more than last Friday.

AAA points out the surprising increase in the national average is largely due to sharp price moves in a handful of states. In California, for example, the average price is up five cents in the last week. Prices also shot higher in the Great Lakes region because refinery maintenance reduced available supplies.

Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, says refinery output is down five percent nationwide but has plunged 12.9 percent in the Midwest in the last week. Jeanette Casselano, a spokesperson for AAA, says rising crude oil prices have emerged as the wild card that could keep gasoline prices abnormally-high heading into the end of the year.

Fortunately for motorists, oil supplies have increased in the last week, which is putting downward pressure on crude prices. Even so, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported this week that oil inventories are about 75 million barrels less than a year ago. That's resulting in the highest gas prices heading into the fall since 2014.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states currently have the highest prices for regular gas, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey:

  • Hawaii ($3.80)
  • California ($3.68)
  • Washington ($3.39)
  • Alaska ($3.32)
  • Oregon ($3.26)
  • Idaho ($3.17)
  • Nevada ($3.20)
  • Utah ($3.08)
  • Pennsylvania ($3.04)
  • Connecticut ($3.02)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found:

  • Alabama ($2.54)
  • Mississippi ($2.55)
  • South Carolina ($2.57)
  • Louisiana ($2.58)
  • Virginia ($2.60)
  • Arkansas ($2.61)
  • Tennessee ($2.61)
  • Texas ($2.62)
  • Missouri ($2.63)
  • North Carolina ($2.69)
At a time when they should be falling, gasoline prices are on the rise. In a move that surprised many industry analysts, prices at the pump made significan...
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Gas prices remarkably stable over the last week

But the average pump price is still 25 cents higher than 12 months ago

The average price of gasoline hardly budged over the last seven days according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey.

Though drivers in some states have seen price fluctuations of three to four cents a gallon, the national average price of regular is $2.85 a gallon, right where it was last Friday.

The average price of premium gas is the same as last week, $3.37 a gallon. Diesel prices have also remained steady at $3.18.

The Carolinas saw no spike in gasoline prices as devastation from Hurricane Florence hampered the movement of fuel supplies. Most stations were well-supplied before the storm hit.

Supply and demand balance

Oil prices hit $80 a barrel this week but it hasn't affected gasoline prices, at least not yet. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports gasoline demand fell sharply last week, to 9.53 million barrels a day.

The lower demand was one factor keeping prices stable over the last week since there was less gasoline available. Gasoline stockpiles declined by 1.7 million barrels, according to the EIA. AAA says that suggests supply and demand are in sync, which should keep prices stable into the fall.

“That balance may tip as more gas stations begin to sell cheaper-to-produce winter blend gasoline – leading the nation’s motorists to likely see pump prices drop in the coming weeks,” AAA said in its latest update.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

The following states currently have the most expensive regular gas prices on average, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey.

  • Hawaii ($3.77)
  • California ($3.63)
  • Washington ($3.38)
  • Alaska ($3.33)
  • Oregon ($3.25)
  • Idaho ($3.20)
  • Nevada ($3.20)
  • Utah ($3.11)
  • Pennsylvania ($3.06)
  • Connecticut ($3.03)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found.

  • Alabama ($2.52)
  • Mississippi ($2.53)
  • Louisiana ($2.57)
  • Arkansas ($2.58)
  • Tennessee ($2.58)
  • South Carolina ($2.58)
  • Texas ($2.59)
  • Missouri ($2.60)
  • Virginia ($2.60)
  • Oklahoma ($2.67)
The average price of gasoline hardly budged over the last seven days according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey.Though drivers in some states have seen pri...
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Gas prices remain stable in September

Hurricane Florence’s impact is not expected to be severe

Motorists found gas prices to be mostly stable over the last seven days as the switch-over to winter-grade gasoline begins.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $2.85 a gallon, roughly the same as last week. The average price of premium gasoline is $3.39 a gallon, the same as last Friday. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.18 a gallon, up a penny from last week.

Hurricane Florence, expected to devastate the Southeast coast, has the potential to cause temporary supply disruptions in that region. But Patrick DeHaan, head of Petroleum Analysis at GasBuddy, doesn't expect that to affect prices at the pump.

"There's thankfully been no supply disruption, just stations that can't keep up with demand ahead of a hurricane, so there's unlikely to be any gas price response either," DeHaan told ConsumerAffairs. "No refineries are in the path and thus none have shut down, so gas prices should continue their fall in most of the country."

DeHaan says there's an outside chance of a very small impact on gasoline prices in the Carolinas and Virginia, but any impact shouldn't last long.

The good news for motorists in all areas of the country is supplies of gasoline are increasing. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports total stockpiles of gasoline rose by 1.3 million barrels last week.

Along the East Coast, where the impact of Florence may hamper the normal movement of fuel stocks, the amount of fuel on hand is 17.6 million barrels more than at this time last year, when fuel prices were significantly lower.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

The following states currently have the most expensive regular gas prices on average, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey.

  • Hawaii ($3.77)

  • California ($3.63)

  • Washington ($3.38)

  • Alaska ($3.32)

  • Idaho ($3.21)

  • Oregon ($3.25)

  • Nevada ($3.17)

  • Utah ($3.14)

  • Pennsylvania ($3.06)

  • Connecticut ($3.04)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found.

  • Alabama ($2.52)

  • Mississippi ($2.54)

  • Arkansas ($2.57)

  • Louisiana ($2.58)

  • Tennessee ($2.58)

  • South Carolina ($2.59)

  • Texas ($2.60)

  • Missouri ($2.60)

  • Virginia ($2.61)

  • Oklahoma ($2.64)

Motorists found gas prices to be mostly stable over the last seven days as the switch-over to winter-grade gasoline begins.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey sh...
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Gas prices still rising despite end to summer driving season

Relief at the pump may be a week or two away

The summer driving season may be over, but demand for gasoline is still high, keeping prices at the pump higher than they would normally be.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.85 a gallon, two cents higher than last week. But that's a penny lower than early August, when millions of consumers were hitting the road for vacations.

The average price of premium is $3.39 a gallon, a penny higher than last Friday. The average cost of diesel fuel is up two cents in the last week.

Prices have remained stubbornly high due to unusually high demand for this late in the season. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports demand hit a record high 9.8 million barrels for the week ending August 24.

However, the EIA reported Thursday that gasoline supplies rose 1.8 million barrels last week, which AAA says should soon provide some relief. Oil prices also retreated this week as supplies increased.

“With summer in the rearview mirror, demand is expected to significantly drop off in the coming weeks which means motorists can expect to see gas prices steadily decline,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “AAA expects the national average to hit $2.70 or less this fall.”

The states with the most expensive regular gas

The following states currently have the most expensive regular gas prices on average, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey.

  • Hawaii ($3.78)
  • California ($3.62)
  • Washington ($3.39)
  • Alaska ($3.32)
  • Idaho ($3.23)
  • Oregon ($3.26)
  • Nevada ($3.19)
  • Utah ($3.17)
  • Pennsylvania ($3.06)
  • Connecticut ($3.04)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found.

  • Alabama ($2.53)
  • Mississippi ($2.54)
  • Arkansas ($2.57)
  • South Carolina ($2.58) 
  • Louisiana ($2.59)
  • Tennessee ($2.59)
  • Virginia ($2.60)
  • Texas ($2.61)
  • Missouri ($2.62)
  • Oklahoma ($2.64)
The summer driving season may be over, but demand for gasoline is still high, keeping prices at the pump higher than they would normally be.The AAA Fue...
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Gas prices drift higher ahead of Labor Day

The shift to cheaper winter grade blends begins soon

Even though gasoline prices have been rock steady in the latter half of the summer, motorists on the road for the Labor Day weekend will face the highest prices at the pump since 2014.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.83 a gallon, up a penny from last Friday. However, prices are 43 cents higher than last Labor Day weekend.

The average price of premium gas is also little changed from last week, at $3.38 per gallon. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.15 per gallon, a penny higher than seven days ago.

“With Labor Day approaching, motorists could see a small swing towards higher gas prices, but any jump should not last past the holiday weekend,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA's spokesperson.

Last year, gas prices spiked immediately after Labor Day, but that was because of Hurricane Harvey, which battered refining facilities along the Gulf Coast and interrupted supply.

As gas stations begin selling winter grade fuel blends, prices should ease a bit, so long as oil prices remain steady. In its latest report, the Energy Information Administration reports stockpiles of both crude oil and gasoline went down unexpectedly last week, which could prevent prices of both from going down very much.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

The following states currently have the most expensive regular gas prices on average, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey.

  • Hawaii ($3.77)
  • California ($3.60)
  • Washington ($3.37)
  • Alaska ($3.34)
  • Idaho ($3.25)
  • Oregon ($3.24)
  • Nevada ($3.19)
  • Utah ($3.19)
  • Connecticut ($3.03)
  • Pennsylvania ($3.03)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found.

  • South Carolina ($2.53)
  • Alabama ($2.53)
  • Mississippi ($2.55)
  • Arkansas ($2.56)
  • Virginia ($2.59)
  • Louisiana ($2.59)
  • Tennessee ($2.59)
  • Texas ($2.59)
  • Missouri ($2.61)
  • Oklahoma ($2.62)
Even though gasoline prices have been rock steady in the latter half of the summer, motorists on the road for the Labor Day weekend will face the highest p...
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Just ahead of Labor Day, motorists catch a break at the gas pump

Prices have dropped two cents in the last week

With the summer driving season about to draw to a close, consumers paid less for gasoline this week, helped by a big drop in demand.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey reports the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.53 a gallon, down two cents a gallon from last Friday and about the same as a month ago.

The average price of premium gas is $3.38 a gallon, a penny lower in the last seven days. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.14, down a penny in the last week.

Consumer demand for motor fuel fell by 60,000 barrels from the previous week, according to the Energy Information Administration. Demand is 176,000 barrels a day lower than at this time last year.

The drop in demand has taken pressure off of supplies, giving gasoline wholesalers and Wall Street traders less leverage to bid up the price. In its weekly assessment, AAA says the tepid demand, combined with growing gasoline stockpiles, could cause another drop in pump prices next week in the run-up to Labor Day.

Prices may dip some more

“Compared to July, consumer demand for gasoline is waning and prices are following suit,” said AAA spokesperson Jeanette Casselano. “The national average is expected to keep moving lower, especially with the switch-over to lower grade gasoline in September.”

Next month, U.S. gas stations will start selling winter-blend gasoline which is cheaper to produce. It contains a fuel that evaporates at low temperatures for vehicle engines to operate properly, especially when the engine is cold.

While motorists in most states continue to see very small fluctuations in price, there are exceptions. The average price in Utah jumped five cents a gallon in the last week. But drivers in Ohio caught the biggest break, with the statewide average plunging 12 cents a gallon this week.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

The following states currently have the most expensive regular gas prices on average, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey.

  • Hawaii ($3.77)
  • California ($3.59)
  • Washington ($3.37)
  • Alaska ($3.33)
  • Oregon ($3.24)
  • Nevada ($3.18)
  • Idaho ($3.25)
  • Utah ($3.19)
  • Connecticut ($3.04)
  • Pennsylvania ($3.03)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found.

  • South Carolina ($2.52)
  • Alabama ($2.53)
  • Mississippi ($2.55)
  • Arkansas ($2.56)
  • Missouri ($2.56)
  • Virginia ($2.59)
  • Oklahoma ($2.59)
  • Louisiana ($2.59)
  • Tennessee ($2.59)
  • Texas ($2.60)
With the summer driving season about to draw to a close, consumers paid less for gasoline this week, helped by a big drop in demand.The AAA Fuel Gauge...
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Gas prices fall a penny a gallon in the last week

Ample oil supplies have been a stabilizing factor

Motorists are benefiting from rising oil stockpiles, keeping refining costs stable. The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.85 a gallon, a penny less than last week.

The average price of premium, used in an increasing number of high-performance cars, held steady at $3.40 a gallon. The average price of diesel fuel also remained the same as last week, at $3.15 a gallon.

Prices at the pump have virtually flatlined in the final third of the summer driving season, helped by ample supplies. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported Thursday that U.S. crude oil stockpiles surged by 6.8 million barrels in the last week, an exceptionally large increase during periods of peak demand.

U.S. oil supplies are still significantly below where they were a year ago, but last summer gasoline prices were about 50 cents a gallon lower than they are now. But while prices are higher than they were last summer, they've also been remarkably stable.

“With a flat national average, U.S. gasoline supply and demand suggest they are balancing,” said Jeanette Casselano, a spokesperson for AAA. “But that’s not to say that we could not see spikes in demand closer to Labor Day as motorists squeeze in those final road trips.”

Even though the national average has been stable, some individual states have seen price swings of five to 10 cents a gallon in the last week. Michigan motorists saw a price drop that averaged nine cents a gallon.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

The following states currently have the most expensive regular gas prices on average, according to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey.

  • Hawaii ($3.77)

  • California ($3.59)

  • Washington ($3.38)

  • Alaska ($3.35)

  • Oregon ($3.26)

  • Nevada ($3.18)

  • Idaho ($3.23)

  • Utah ($3.14)

  • Connecticut ($3.05)

  • Pennsylvania ($3.05)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest prices for regular gas, the survey found.

  • Alabama ($2.55)

  • South Carolina ($2.55)

  • Mississippi ($2.56)

  • Arkansas ($2.58)

  • Missouri ($2.58)

  • Texas ($2.60)

  • Virginia ($2.61)

  • Oklahoma ($2.61)

  • Louisiana ($2.62)

  • Tennessee ($2.62)

Motorists are benefiting from rising oil stockpiles, keeping refining costs stable. The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular g...
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Gasoline prices remain stable amid surprising drop in demand

Still, consumers are paying the highest August gas prices in four years

Gasoline prices were remarkably stable over the last seven days, considering the fluctuations in petroleum supply and demand. Still, motorists are paying the highest August gasoline prices since 2014.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey puts the national average price of regular gas at $2.87 a gallon, just a fraction of a cent lower than this time last week. It's the same price as a month ago, but more than 50 cents higher than at this time last year.

The average price of premium is $3.40 a gallon, down a penny from last week. The price of diesel fuel is $3.15, the same as last Friday.

Despite this being the middle of one of the busiest summer vacation months, the government reports consumer demand for gasoline fell in the last week. The latest numbers from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) show gasoline demand went from a near-record high to a decline of more than 530,000 barrels a day. However, the drop is not expected to affect prices at the pump.

Slight downturn ahead?

"Despite the week-over-week drop, demand is still strong, which – along with tighter supplies – have helped keep pump prices high this summer," AAA said in a consumer advisory. "Should demand figures trend lower in coming weeks, pump prices could be poised for a slight downturn."

It also helps that oil prices dropped unexpectedly in the last week on oversupply concerns.

Despite the stable prices nationally, drivers in some individual states saw some sharp increases during the week. In Michigan, the statewide average is back up to $3.03 a gallon, a gain of eight cents in the last seven days.

Statewide averages are up seven cents a gallon in Idaho, up six cents in Pennsylvania, and up a nickel in Utah.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

The following states have the most expensive regular fuel prices, according to AAA.

  • Hawaii ($3.77)

  • California ($3.61)

  • Washington ($3.39)

  • Alaska ($3.38)

  • Oregon ($3.27)

  • Nevada ($3.19)

  • Idaho ($3.19)

  • Utah ($3.12)

  • Connecticut ($3.08)

  • Pennsylvania ($3.08)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The following states have the cheapest regular fuel prices on average, AAA found.

  • Alabama ($2.57)

  • Mississippi ($2.57)

  • South Carolina ($2.58)

  • Arkansas ($2.59)

  • Missouri ($2.61)

  • Louisiana ($2.63)

  • Virginia ($2.62)

  • Texas ($2.63)

  • Tennessee ($2.64)

  • Oklahoma ($2.64)

Gasoline prices were remarkably stable over the last seven days, considering the fluctuations in petroleum supply and demand. Still, motorists are paying t...
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Gas prices tick up amid high demand

But prices at the pump remain remarkably stable in most states

With families hitting the road for August vacations, fuel prices are slowly rising. The national average price of regular gained two cents a gallon in the last week, according to AAA.

The average price of regular is $2.87 a gallon, the first real increase in more than a month. The average price of premium gas is $3.41 a gallon, also two cents higher in the last seven days. The average price of diesel fuel hasn't budged from $3.15 a gallon in the last week and is a penny cheaper than a month ago.

The major influence on fuel prices is very strong demand from U.S. consumers. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports demand for gasoline was at a near record-high of 9.88 million barrels a day in the last week of July.

In fact, late July demand was about 30,000 barrels a day more than the previous week and up more than 1.5 percent over this time last summer.

High demand

"High demand – along with tighter supplies, which fell 2.5 million barrels – have driven the pump price increases seen around the country during this week," AAA said in a market analysis. "If demand remains robust amid dwindling stocks, motorists are likely to see pump prices continue to increase throughout the summer."

Despite the slightly higher national average price, some states enjoyed some relief at the pump this week. The statewide price of regular in Michigan is $2.95 a gallon, seven cents cheaper than last Friday.

Meanwhile, the average price is up five cents a gallon in the last week in Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Oklahoma.

In a tweet, GasBuddy analyst Patrick DeHaan predicts volatile gas prices the the Great Lakes region this fall, quoting sources as saying BP's Whiting refinery will see its largest unit shut down for maintenance in September, with reduced output for nearly two months.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

These states have the most expensive regular gas prices, according to AAA.

  • Hawaii ($3.76)
  • California ($3.62)
  • Washington ($3.40)
  • Alaska ($3.39)
  • Oregon ($3.28)
  • Nevada ($3.19)
  • Idaho ($3.12)
  • Utah ($3.09)
  • Connecticut ($3.07)
  • Pennsylvania ($3.04)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

These states currently have the lowest regular gas prices, the group found.

  • Alabama ($2.57)
  • Mississippi ($2.57)
  • South Carolina ($2.59)
  • Arkansas ($2.60)
  • Louisiana ($2.61)
  • Virginia ($2.62)
  • Missouri ($2.64)
  • Tennessee ($2.65)
  • Oklahoma ($2.65)
  • Texas ($2.65)
With families hitting the road for August vacations, fuel prices are slowly rising. The national average price of regular gained two cents a gallon in the...
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Gas prices hold steady over the last week

Fluctuation in oil supplies has had little effect at the pump

Consumers found fairly stable gas prices over the last week, even as the oil industry reported a significant drop in U.S. supplies.

For the week ending on July 20, U.S. crude oil inventories fell by 6.2 million barrels, giving up the gain of nearly the same amount in the previous week. The rise and fall of oil stockpiles barely phased refiners and gasoline wholesalers.

"The tightened domestic crude supply amid robust global gasoline demand and high global crude demand will likely sustain the more expensive crude oil prices seen this year into the foreseeable future," AAA said in an analysis. "This trend will keep gas prices high throughout the remainder of the summer and possibly into fall."

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the average price of regular gasoline is $2.85 a gallon, the same as last Friday and nearly the same as a month ago. However, it's up about 57 cents a gallon more than this time a year ago.

Today's average price of premium gasoline is $3.39 a gallon, a penny less than last week. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.15, also a penny lower than last week.

"If demand and supply stay consistent, prices have the potential to stabilize, barring any major events – geopolitical or natural disasters,” said AAA spokesperson Jeanette Casselano.

The states with the most expensive regular gas

The following states have the most expensive regular gas prices on average, according to AAA.

  • Hawaii ($3.78)

  • California ($3.62)

  • Washington ($3.40)

  • Alaska ($3.38)

  • Oregon ($3.28)

  • Nevada ($3.19)

  • Idaho ($3.11)

  • Utah ($3.09)

  • Connecticut ($3.06)

  • Pennsylvania ($3.02)

The states with the cheapest regular gas

The following states currently have the cheapest regular gas prices, according to AAA's analysis.

  • South Carolina ($2.54)

  • Alabama ($2.54)

  • Mississippi ($2.55)

  • Arkansas ($2.58)

  • Louisiana ($2.58)

  • Virginia ($2.60)

  • Tennessee ($2.60)

  • Oklahoma ($2.62)

  • Missouri ($2.62)

  • Texas ($2.63)

Consumers found fairly stable gas prices over the last week, even as the oil industry reported a significant drop in U.S. supplies.For the week ending...
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U.S. oil production surge sends gas prices lower

Prices had been rising until late in the week

Motorists will get an unexpected break at the gas pump this weekend as gasoline prices have declined three cents a gallon in the last few days.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey puts the national average price of regular gas at $2.85 a gallon, down from $2.88 just five days ago. The national average price of premium is $3.40 a gallon and the price of diesel is $3.16.

Prices softened at midweek when the Energy Information Administration reported a jump in U.S. oil production to 11 million barrels a day, spurred in large part by the recent run-up in oil prices. However, the news of increased domestic production sent oil prices lower.

At the same time, U.S. oil stockpiles also rose. Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, says he expects the increase in supply to be a one-off event, without a lasting impact on prices.

"It appears that a high level of imports, combined with refineries processing slightly less crude oil last week, were main factors," DeHaan told ConsumerAffairs. "I think the imports number is a bit high and isn't likely to be high next week."

Until the last day or two, AAA had noted an increase in gasoline prices in just about every state. At the beginning of the week, some states were paying a dime a gallon more since July 4, including Delaware, Florida, and Michigan.

Today, drivers in Michigan are enjoying one of the biggest one-week drops in gas prices in the nation, with a statewide average of $2.93 a gallon, down from $3.03 a week earlier.

States with the most expensive gas

Here are the states with the most expensive average gas prices, according to AAA:

  • Hawaii ($3.78)

  • California ($3.63)

  • Washington ($3.42)

  • Alaska ($3.39)

  • Oregon ($3.30)

  • Nevada ($3.21)

  • Idaho ($3.12)

  • Utah ($3.11)

  • Connecticut ($3.07)

  • Pennsylvania ($3.04)

States with the cheapest gas

Here are the states that currently have the lowest average gas prices:

  • Alabama ($2.55)

  • Mississippi ($2.55)

  • South Carolina ($2.55)

  • Arkansas ($2.59)

  • Louisiana ($2.59)

  • Virginia ($2.61)

  • Tennessee ($2.62)

  • Oklahoma ($2.62)

  • Texas ($2.62)

  • Missouri ($2.63)

Motorists will get an unexpected break at the gas pump this weekend as gasoline prices have declined three cents a gallon in the last few days.The AAA...
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Despite oil's rise, gas prices are up just two cents in the last week

But falling oil supplies could signal higher prices to come

The price of gasoline has remained stable over the last week, even as oil prices have remained volatile.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular is $2.88 a gallon, up just two cents in the last seven days. Today's price is three cents cheaper than it was a month ago.

The national average price of premium, required by a growing number of high-performance engines, is $3.42 a gallon. The average price of diesel fuel is $3.17 a gallon.

Some of the most volatile gas prices can be found in Ohio, where the statewide average gained seven cents overnight, to $2.81 a gallon. That's still two cents lower than the price seven days ago.

While gasoline prices tend to drift lower toward the end of the summer driving season, AAA warns that this year could be different. The Energy Information Administration this week reported a huge drop in oil stockpiles -- the largest since October 2016.

According to the report, U.S. oil stockpiles are roughly 90 million barrels lower than they were at this time last year. At the same time, the government reports U.S. exports of oil and gasoline rose in the last week, even as domestic demand increased. Refineries are operating at 96.7 percent of capacity.

Heading into the weekend, motorists may find the lowest gas prices of the summer, as market forces may put upward pressure on prices, precisely at the time they have historically declined.

The states with the highest gasoline prices

  • Hawaii ($3.76)
  • California ($3.66)
  • Washington ($3.43)
  • Alaska ($3.40)
  • Oregon ($3.31)
  • Nevada ($3.24)
  • Idaho ($3.14)
  • Utah ($3.13)
  • Connecticut ($3.08)
  • Pennsylvania ($3.05)

The states with the lowest gasoline prices

  • Alabama ($2.55)
  • Mississippi ($2.57)
  • South Carolina ($2.57)
  • Louisiana ($2.60)
  • Arkansas ($2.61)
  • Virginia ($2.62)
  • Tennessee ($2.63)
  • Missouri ($2.65)
  • Texas ($2.65)
  • Oklahoma ($2.65)
The price of gasoline has remained stable over the last week, even as oil prices have remained volatile.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national av...
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Could rising gas prices bring on a recession?

Economists are beginning to express concern

As any motorist will tell you, gasoline prices have hit their highest point in years, cutting into many consumers' budgets.

Because of that, some economists have begun to worry that the economic expansion, which began at the end of the Great Recession in June 2009, may be close to an end.

The Wall Street Journal reports that, at this point at least, consumers have been able to weather the price rise without too much difficulty. But should prices climb even more in the months ahead, all bets may be off.

Airlines have already adapted to higher fuel costs by raising ticket prices. Over time, other industries might be affected, and respond by slowing hiring. According to the Journal report, 3M and Whirlpool have cited higher costs affecting corporate profits.

Gas prices just one factor

Economist Joel Naroff, of Naroff Economic Advisers, doesn't think higher gasoline prices alone will be enough to throw the economy into recession. But there is no question that they can add to inflation and raise interest rates, both of which increase consumer costs.

“Worse, they come as the impacts of the tariffs are starting to hit, also raising both business and consumer costs,” Naroff told ConsumerAffairs. “While tax cuts have added to household income, the rising expenses are offsetting those positive effects.”

As gasoline costs rise, they may also negate the benefits lower and middle income consumers received from what Naroff sees as fairly modest tax cuts.

“Put simply, the rise in gasoline prices and the impacts of tariffs are negating the tax cuts for many households, slowing growth,” he said.

It's happened before

Those with long memories may recall that oil speculators bid up the price of oil in 2008 to well over $100 a barrel, causing gasoline prices to exceed $4 a gallon. The explanation was that worldwide economic growth was fueling the price rise, not speculation.

However, the world was actually in a recession at the time, culminating with the financial crisis in September 2008. Almost immediately afterward, the price of gasoline plunged to below $2 a gallon.

Today, the national average price of regular gasoline, according to AAA, is $2.87 a gallon, 61 cents a gallon more than at this time last year. Consumers purchasing 25 gallons in a typical fill-up are paying $15 more per fill up than they did last year.

But some consumers are paying a lot more than that, since $2.87 is just the national average. Drivers in western states are paying a lot more.

In California, the statewide average is $3.66 a gallon. It's $3.43 a gallon in Washington.

As any motorist will tell you, gasoline prices have hit their highest point in years, cutting into many consumers' budgets.Because of that, some econom...
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Volatile oil prices keep gas prices moving in both directions

Prices at the pump have been going up and down all year

If you've noticed that the prices at your local gas stations have been going up and down like a yoyo lately, you can blame it on the fickle price of oil.

The price went up when OPEC decided to cut production last year. It went down when U.S. shale producers started pumping more, taking advantage of the higher price. But it went up again when an improving economy boosted demand and supplies began to get smaller.

Now, oil prices are slipping a bit, mainly because of concerns that a trade war will slow economies around the world. President Trump has also been busy tweeting his irritation at OPEC, saying the cartel is not doing enough to keep oil prices in check.

After all, the more oil goes up in price, the more expensive gasoline gets. Consumers tend to measure how well they are doing financially by how much they pay at the pump.

Oil prices are falling again

U.S. crude oil is trading on the futures market today for about $73.52 a barrel, down about $1 from the previous session. International Brent crude slipped below $77 on world markets.

While trade concerns may be partly responsible for the decline, the industry was surprised to learn this week that oil stockpiles in the U.S. are getting larger, not smaller.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports inventories rose by 1.3 million barrels last week, the first increase in three weeks.

"The surprise build in total crude stocks gave market observers pause amid a slew of other factors influencing the oil market, including increasing geopolitical factors – in Iran, Libya, and Venezuela – potentially destabilizing global supply and high crude exports from the U.S.," AAA said in a statement.

Volatile gas prices

Those other factors have not only driven up oil prices this year, they've also increased gasoline prices.

Refineries purchase oil on the futures market for production, and what they pay influences what gasoline distributors pay and what retail gas stations charge consumers.

According to the AAA Fuel Gauge Survey, the national average price of gasoline is $2.86 a gallon, just a penny more than last week but eight cents less than a month ago. As usual, where you happen to be driving determines how much you pay.

Motorists in California are currently paying an average of $3.66 a gallon for regular and $3.92 for premium. But drivers in South Carolina are filling their tanks with regular for $2.53 a gallon.

If you've noticed that the prices at your local gas stations have been going up and down like a yoyo lately, you can blame it on the fickle price of oil....
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Gas prices likely to follow oil prices higher

But Independence Day travelers will still pay less than on Memorial Day

Millions of Americans are hitting the road this week for the Independence Day holiday, and they'll pay less for gasoline than they did on Memorial Day.

But the lower prices may not last, since oil prices appear to be headed higher due to surging demand and declining supplies. The supply might go even lower in the wake of the Trump administration's decision to reverse the Iran nuclear deal. The U.S. is pressuring its trading partners to not purchase oil from Iran.

The loss of Iranian oil on the world market would contribute to the continuing shortfall from Venezuela, where political and economic turmoil has significantly reduced that oil-rich country's output.

Pressuring the Saudis

Over the weekend, President Trump tweeted that the Saudis had told him they would increase their production to make up for the shortfall. The White House later clarified that the Saudis had only said they could produce more oil, "if needed."

But in an interview with Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures with Maria Bartiromo,” Trump suggested he had some leverage with the leaders of Saudi Arabia.

“Don’t forget the one negative to the Iran deal is that you lose a lot of oil, and they got to make up for it. And who is their big enemy? Iran. Okay. You think of it. Iran is their big enemy, so they are going to have to do it,” Trump said.

Oil prices started the week slightly lower, but Brent Crude is closing in on $79 a barrel. Last week's price was the highest in four years.

Late last week, the U.S. Energy Information Administration reported the largest one-week drop in crude oil inventories in the last five years. Oil inventories are more than 92 million barrels lower than at this time last year, contributing to the upward price pressure.

Reflected at the pump

The surge in oil prices is being felt at the gas pump, but there will likely be greater pain in the coming weeks. For holiday travelers this week, fuel prices should be fairly stable.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.85 a gallon, just a penny more than the previous week. But on Memorial Day, the price was closer to $3 a gallon. A year ago, holiday travelers were only paying $2.23 a gallon.

Travelers in the West will pay the most for gasoline this week. The statewide average is $3.66 a gallon in California. The lowest gas prices are found in the Southeast. The average price of regular is 2.52 a gallon in South Carolina and Alabama.

Millions of Americans are hitting the road this week for the Independence Day holiday, and they'll pay less for gasoline than they did on Memorial Day....
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More oil from OPEC could mean lower prices at the pump

But rising demand could limit how far prices will fall

A month ago, the national average gasoline price was pennies away from $3 a gallon. However, the cost of fuel has dropped in the last four weeks, and an OPEC decision could send prices even lower.

The member nations of the oil cartel have voted to increase oil production by 1 million barrels a day to meet growing demand. As a result, world oil prices have begun falling, lowering the costs for refiners who turn oil into gasoline.

While that's good news for consumers, Patrick DeHaan, Head of Petroleum Analysis at GasBuddy, said gas prices may not respond immediately.

"Perhaps eventually, but it will take time for oil production to rise, so in this case we may not see that additional oil until the second half of the summer at best," DeHaan told ConsumerAffairs. "I wouldn’t expect much change just yet."

Uncertainty remains

That's because there remains some uncertainty over how much extra oil refiners will see. The 1 million barrels a day is a target, but analysts say not all members will be able to meet it. At the same time, U.S. oil producers are expanding production to take advantage of higher prices.

OPEC said over the weekend that it could increase production even more than what has been announced in an effort to keep rising energy costs from damaging the world economy.

Despite recent high prices for oil and the increase in demand for gasoline, motorists have gotten some relief at the gas pump in recent weeks. The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is $2.84 a gallon, down from $2.89 a week ago and 12 cents lower than a month ago.

In a statement, AAA said the long-term outlook for consumers is positive. With the increase in crude production, AAA says crude oil prices are expected to decrease, and in turn, lower the cost of producing refined products, including gasoline.

A month ago, the national average gasoline price was pennies away from $3 a gallon. However, the cost of fuel has dropped in the last four weeks, and an OP...
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Motorists getting early relief from rising gas prices

A new report predicts more stable oil prices for the rest of 2018

Consumers who have been squeezed by rapidly rising gasoline prices may soon get some relief.

A new report by the International Energy Agency (IEA) predicts the recent spike in world oil prices is pretty much over, with crude oil prices moderating for the rest of 2018. That could keep gasoline prices from going even higher.

“Oil prices are unlikely to increase as sharply as they did from mid-2017 onward and thus the dampening effect on demand will be reduced,” the IEA said in its report. “Demand might also receive support from measures under consideration in some countries, e.g. Argentina, Brazil, India, Indonesia, Russia and Turkey, to help consumers cope with higher prices.”

Production is increasing

The report anticipates increased demand in 2019, but the authors say increased production from non-OPEC countries like the U.S. and Russia should keep demand and supply in balance.

“As far as supply is concerned, we have revised upwards our estimate for 2018 non-OPEC production growth to 2 million barrels a day, and in 2019 we will also see bumper growth, albeit slightly reduced, of 1.7 million barrels a day,” the authors write. “The United States shows by far the biggest gain.”

Already, the extra production is paying off for consumers at the gas pump. The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gas is $2.90 a gallon, down four cents in the last seven days. It's still four cents higher than a month ago, when prices surged ahead of the Memorial Day weekend.

An extra $69 a month

Earlier this week, AAA reported that the rise in fuel prices was costing consumers an average of $69 a month more to fill their tanks. The auto club estimates that gasoline expenses are accounting, on average, for 7 percent of the typical consumer’s 2018 annual income.

The recent easing of fuel prices has come earlier than expected. Normally, prices rise through the Independence Day holiday before beginning to ease. After Labor Day, refineries return to producing winter grade fuel blends, which cost less.

Hawaii has the highest average gasoline price in the nation, at $3.73 a gallon, but California is a close second, at $3.71. According to AAA, Mono County, Calif., is the costliest place to fill up, with an average gas price of $4.41 per gallon.

The cheapest fuel in the nation is found in South Carolina, where the statewide average is $2.57 a gallon.

Consumers who have been squeezed by rapidly rising gasoline prices may soon get some relief.A new report by the International Energy Agency (IEA) predi...
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Average gas price near $3 a gallon for Memorial Day weekend

It’s the highest level since 2014

Motorists taking road trips for over the Memorial Day weekend will pay a lot more for gasoline than they did last year.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the average price of gas is nearly $2.97 cents a gallon, 60 cents a gallon more than at this time last year. The national average price of regular gas is up six cents a gallon in the last week and has gained 20 cents in the last month.

The main reason for the increase has been a surge in the price of oil – the biggest in four years. Oil prices have increased because consumers are driving more and OPEC is producing less.

Political turmoil in Venezuela has significantly reduced oil production in that petroleum-rich nation. With the U.S. pulling out of the Iran deal, oil traders are bidding up the price of oil on the expectation that less Iranian oil would be available.

The price of oil exceeded $80 a barrel this week for the first time since 2014, making it more expensive for refiners to produce gasoline.

$3 a gallon not far away

“AAA forecasts nearly 37 million travelers will hit the road for the holiday weekend,” said AAA spokesperson Jeanette Casselano. “Trends are indicating that this summer is likely to bring the national average to at least $3/gallon.”

Today, 14 states report an average of $3 a gallon or more. Outside of the typical West Coast states, Idaho, and Utah, this count includes six Northeast and Midwest states. Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New York, Washington, D.C., Illinois and Michigan have crossed that milestone, and, Arizona, New Jersey, and Rhode Island are all within four-cents of hitting the $3 mark.

Gasbuddy predicts the skyrocketing price of fuel will keep more people at home this weekend, as well as during the summer. In its annual survey, Gasbuddy found only 58 percent said they will take a road trip this summer, a 24 percent decrease from last year. In the survey, 39 percent cited high gas prices as affecting their summer travel decisions, compared to 19 percent in 2017.

Pain could be temporary

But there is some good news. The pain at the pump may not last throughout the summer.

“With refineries now well positioned for the summer months, we may see some relief in mid-June,” said Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy.

Even so, DeHaan says gas will be the highest since the summer of 2014, with the strong likelihood that the national average price will be well over $3 a gallon before it starts to fall.

The price of oil has already begun to back off a bit. In something of a surprise, the Energy Information Administration reported this week that U.S. oil stockpiles jumped by 5.7 million barrels. Oil supplies are more than 78 million barrels higher than they were at this time last year.

Motorists taking road trips for over the Memorial Day weekend will pay a lot more for gasoline than they did last year.The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows...
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Gas prices continue to rise after U.S. pulls out of Iran deal

Prices at the pump have risen seven cents in seven days

That jump in gasoline prices you've noticed in the last week may have more than a little to do with geopolitics.

AAA reports the national average price of regular gasoline is around $2.88 a gallon, up seven cents in the last seven days and 17 cents higher than a month ago.

Gasoline is following crude oil sharply higher, and AAA says part of the reason is the White House decision to withdraw from the Iran deal. That means it is renewing sanctions, which include not buying Iranian oil.

Combination of factors

Oil prices have risen over the late spring as supplies have gotten tighter and demand has increased. With the possibility of Iranian oil being removed from the world's supply, the price of oil shot up last week, and gasoline prices rose along with it.

As a result, AAA says 36 states have seen at least a five cents per gallon rise in the price of fuel.

“The administration’s move, combined with the switchover to summer blend, growing global demand, and shrinking supply, continues to fuel pump prices as we approach the summer driving season,” said Jeanette Casselano, a AAA spokesperson. “AAA predicts that the national average may reach $3 a gallon this summer, especially if crude oil prices continue to increase.”

The price of premium gas, required for most high-performance cars, is already well past $3 a gallon – which is significantly more expensive than diesel fuel.

Sticker shock at the gas pump has been most severe for motorists in Ohio, where the average price shot up by 15 cents a gallon. Drivers in Missouri are paying 12 cents a gallon more, and the average gallon of gas rose by 11 cents a gallon in the last week in Kentucky and Minnesota.

Above $3 in nine states

The AAA analysis shows motorists in 19 states are now paying above the national average for fuel, with nine states seeing average gas prices above the $3 a gallon mark. According to GasBuddy, gas stations in 25 cities are selling gas for 70 cents a gallon more than at this time last year.

Consumers with long memories may not think gasoline is that expensive. In the summer of 2014, the average price rose above $3 a gallon, just before OPEC increased production in an unsuccessful effort to drive U.S. shale producers out of business.

The highest average price for regular gas was $4.11, recorded in July 2008. Analysts think chances of that record being broken anytime soon are slim.

They point out that U.S. oil production capacity is much larger now than a decade ago. Should oil prices start to rise too quickly, U.S. producers will pump more oil.

That jump in gasoline prices you've noticed in the last week may have more than a little to do with geopolitics.AAA reports the national average price...
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Gas prices surge in the last week

Pump prices are responding to increased demand and higher oil prices

Gasoline prices have surged in the last week, propelled by the annual switch-over to summer grade fuel, strong demand, and a sharp rise in oil prices.

The price of crude oil rose above $68 a barrel on Wednesday for the first time since 2015, when OPEC flooded the market with oil to drive down prices in a bid to take marketshare from U.S. shale oil producers. Rising crude prices have increased costs for oil refineries at precisely the time they are producing more expensive summer blends.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the average price of regular gasoline is $2.73 a gallon, up seven cents in the last week, and 19 cents higher than last month. The national average price of gas is at its highest level since the summer of 2015.

There is a wide disparity in what motorists are paying at the pump. The lowest statewide average is found in Missouri, Arkansas, and Kansas, at $2.48 a gallon. The most expensive gas is in Hawaii, at $3.57 a gallon, but California is close behind, at $3.55.

$5 per gallon gas is back

Patrick DeHaan, petroleum analyst at GasBuddy, reports gas prices have exceeded $5 a gallon at two stations in Essex, Calif. He attributes much of the surge in gas prices to a spike in demand.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration report for the week ending April 13 shows gasoline demand surged to 9.86 million barrels a day, well ahead of the normal start of the summer driving season.

AAA reports that demand level is at the highest mid-April rate on record and the highest so far this year. The group speculates the increase is likely the result of more drivers hitting the road as warmer weather starts to spreads across the country.

At the same time, U.S. oil refineries are upping their exports to other nations. According to AAA, total U.S. gasoline production grew to 10.2 million barrels a day last week, production rates usually found during the peak summer months.

Gasoline prices have surged in the last week, propelled by the annual switch-over to summer grade fuel, strong demand, and a sharp rise in oil prices.T...
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Gasoline prices jump 11 cents in last two weeks

Fuel costs more than 30 cents a gallon more than it did at this time last year

Motorists across the country have seen gasoline prices rise as refiners make the switch from winter-grade gasoline to summer blends.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is about $2.66 a gallon, up five cents in the last week and 11 cents higher over the last two weeks. Gasoline is more than 30 cents a gallon higher than at this time last year.

The average price of premium gas is $3.18 a gallon, increasing by a similar amount over the last two weeks. The average price of diesel fuel is $2.97.

“Today, only 38 percent of U.S. gas stations are selling gasoline for $2.50 or less and that percentage will likely dwindle in coming weeks,” said Jeanette Casselano, a spokesperson for AAA. “The holiday weekend, strong demand, and preparation for summer gasoline are all factors that have driven and will continue to drive higher gas prices into early spring.”

Where prices are rising fastest

Fuel prices have risen faster in some parts of the country than others. According to AAA, average gas prices jumped 14 cents a gallon in the last month in Utah, 10 cents in Kentucky, and nine cents in Missouri, Florida, and Arizona.

The most expensive fuel in the country is still found in Hawaii, where the statewide average is $3.52 a gallon. But California is catching up, with an average of $3.51. Other expensive states for gasoline are Washington ($3.17), Alaska ($3.13), Oregon ($3.09), and Nevada ($3.01).

The cheapest gasoline in the nation is in Arkansas, at $2.38 a gallon. It's followed by Mississippi ($2.39), Missouri ($2.40), and Oklahoma ($2.41).

Higher prices still ahead

In a Tweet, GasBuddy analyst Patrick DeHaan noted prices at the pump in Chicago are close to going over $3 a gallon for the first time since 2015. He says rising oil prices are as much to blame as the seasonal changes at refineries.

If gasoline prices hold to their normal seasonal pattern, they should continue to rise until Memorial Day, after which they should begin to slowly fall. Providing hope that the rise may be moderate this year is the fact that consumers are using less gasoline this spring.

The Energy Information Administration reports that gasoline demand fell to 9.2 million barrels a day last week, the lowest point during March.

Motorists across the country have seen gasoline prices rise as refiners make the switch from winter-grade gasoline to summer blends.The AAA Fuel Gauge...
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Gasoline prices near 2017 highs

Rising oil prices may keep gas prices higher than last year, despite the switch to winter grade fuel

Gasoline prices are moving higher at a time when they normally move lower. The summer driving season is over and refineries are producing cheaper winter gr...

Gas prices falling but still higher than normal

National average price down five cents in the last week

Gasoline prices are drifting lower from their post-Hurricane Harvey spike, but remain significantly higher than this time last year.

The AAA Fuel Gauge Survey shows the national average price of regular gasoline is around $2.57 a gallon, down five cents from a week ago but 37 cents higher than fall 2016.

Prices rose quickly after Hurricane Harvey hit the Texas Gulf Coast last month, forcing many refineries to curtail production. That created supply shortages, raising the price of gasoline nationwide. After topping out close to $2.70 a gallon, gasoline prices have been going down over the last two weeks.

"That downward momentum is starting to pick up steam," Gasbuddy senior analyst Patrick DeHaan told ConsumerAffairs. "Gasoline inventories are continuing to recover after hurricanes Harvey and Irma, and that's helping to put downward pressure on gas prices."

Big drop in prices in Delaware

Consumers in some states are seeing gas prices fall faster than the nation as a whole. DeHaan says prices seem to be falling faster in the Midwest and in the East; Delaware leads all states with a decline of around 10 cents a gallon in the last week.

Prices remain higher than normal in the Southeast, which normally enjoys some of the lowest fuel prices in the nation.

"We're still seeing some supply problems as a result of that temporary partial shutdown of the Colonial Pipeline after Hurricane Harvey," DeHaan said. "We're still