Current Events in October 2017

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    Dunlop GrandTrek PT3A tires recalled

    The tires complete DOT identification markings

    Trek Tire is recalling 1,400 Dunlop GrandTrek PT3A tires, size 275/50R21, manufactured between December 1, 2016, and December 7, 2016.

    The recalled tires lack the complete DOT identification marking prefix for radial tires and light vehicles.

    As such, they fail to conform to the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) number 139, "New Pneumatic Radial Tires for Light Vehicles."

    The lack of complete DOT identification markings can lead to inappropriate use of the tires, possibly increasing the risk of a crash.

    What to do

    Dealer Tire LLC will notify owners and the noncompliant tires will be replaced free of charge. The recall is expected to begin during October 2017.

    Owners may contact Trek Tire at 1-207-200-6967.

    Trek Tire is recalling 1,400 Dunlop GrandTrek PT3A tires, size 275/50R21, manufactured between December 1, 2016, and December 7, 2016.The recalled tire...

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      Dangerous driving behaviors to address with your teen

      NHTSA suggests talking points for parents as part of National Teen Driver Safety Week

      Crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the U.S, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). In 2015, approximately 2,300 teen ages 16 to 19 were killed in motor vehicle crashes.

      Fatal car accidents claim more teen lives than injuries, disease, or violence.

      Experts attribute teens’ heightened risk of involvement in a crash to their overconfidence, inexperience, and an increased likelihood to speed, make mistakes, and get distracted -- especially if their friends are in the car.

      The NHTSA is raising awareness during National Teen Driver Safety Week (October 15-21), and encouraging parents to talk with their teen drivers about what is and isn’t safe driving behavior.

      Risky behaviors

      Distracted driving, drowsy driving, speeding, alcohol use, not wearing a seatbelt, and driving with passengers are among the risky driving behaviors teens are more likely than older drivers to engage in behind the wheel.

      Surveys show teens whose parents set firm rules for driving tend to engage in less risky driving behaviors and be involved in fewer crashes

      Reducing crash risk

      Here are a few topics to talk about while going over safe driving habits with teens:

      • Don’t drink and drive. Despite not being legally allowed to buy alcohol, almost one out of five teen drivers involved in fatal crashes had been drinking, according to 2015 data from the NHTSA. Remind your teen that driving under the influence of any substance– including illicit prescription or even over the counter drugs–could have deadly consequences and is strictly enforced.

      • Always wear a seatbelt. The simple act of buckling up before embarking on a drive could save your teen’s life or help prevent injuries.

      • Avoid distractions. Distraction was a key factor in 58 percent of crashes involving drivers ages 16 to 19, according to an analysis of video footage of 1,691 moderate-to-severe crashes 6 seconds before they occurred. Ask your teen not to text while they’re driving and to limit other distractions, such as eating, fiddling with controls, or talking to passengers.

      • Pull over if you’re drowsy. Drowsiness can impair your ability to drive just like alcohol. If your teen suddenly feels drowsy, tell them they should immediately slow down and pull off the road into a safe parking space. Alternatively, they could take a pit stop, use the bathroom, and get a soda or coffee to wake up.

      • Stick to the speed limit. Speeding is a factor in nearly 30 percent of fatal crashes involving teen drivers, according to AAA. Inexperienced drivers, in particular, should make sure they heed the speed limits, especially in construction work zones.

      • Maintain a safe distance. Following too closely accounts for a large number of the crashes caused by teens. In wet weather, double or triple the space you normally leave between you and the car in front of you. More space is needed to stop on slick roads.

      Crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the U.S, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). In 2015, approximatel...

      Polaris Recalls ACE 325 ROVs

      The exhaust header pipe can crack

      Polaris Industries of Medina, Minn., is recalling about 6,300 Polaris ACE 325 recreational off-highway vehicles (ROVs).

      The exhaust header pipe can crack and release hot exhaust gases into the engine compartment, posing fire and burn hazards.

      The company has received six reports of cracked exhaust pipes, including two reports of seat damage due to melting. No fires or injuries have been reported.

      This recall involves all model year 2014 through 2016 Polaris ACE 325 recreational off-highway vehicles (ROVs).  

      Year

      Model

      Description

      2014

      A14BH33AJ

      Ace 325 in white

      2015

      A15DAA32AA

      Ace 325 in green

      2015

      A15DAA32AJ

      Ace 325 in white

      2016

      A16DAA32A1

      Ace 325 in green

      2016

      A16DAA32A7

      Ace 325 in red

      The recalled ROVs have a single seat and were sold in white, green and red.

      For model year 2014 and 2015 ATVs, “Polaris” is printed on the front grill and “Ace” is printed on the rear panel.

      For model year 2016 ATVs, “Polaris” is printed on the front grill and “Polaris Ace” is printed on the rear panel.

      The VIN is printed on the right front frame of the vehicles.

      The ROVs, manufactured in the U.S., were sold at Polaris dealers nationwide from December 2014, through July 2017, for about $7,500.

      What to do

      Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled ROVs and contact Polaris to schedule a free repair. Polaris is contacting all known purchasers directly.

      Consumers may contact Polaris at 800-765-2747 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. (CT) Monday through Friday or online at www.polaris.com and click on “Off Road Safety Recalls” for more information. 

      Polaris Industries of Medina, Minn., is recalling about 6,300 Polaris ACE 325 recreational off-highway vehicles (ROVs).The exhaust header pipe can crac...