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Apple delays employees’ return to office due to rise in COVID-19 cases

Thousands of workers are pushing for a more flexible work-from-home policy

With COVID-19 cases continuing to rise, Apple has decided to delay its workers’ return to offices. 

Last month, Apple CEO Tim Cook told workers that they would have to go into the office at least three days a week starting in early September. Cook reiterated at the time that he believes face-to-face collaboration plays a crucial role in driving innovation and results. 

"For all that we've been able to achieve while many of us have been separated, the truth is that there h...

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    Apple to offer two-hour delivery due to the pandemic

    The service is available for $5 for a limited time only

    Apple has announced that it will be offering two-hour shipping on items in its stores for a limited time. The company said the new service, which costs $5, is available “in most metros.” 

    "With convenient delivery and pickup methods, Apple is making it easier and safer to get the products you want," Apple said on its website.

    To prevent the spread of COVID-19, deliveries will be contactless. Drivers can also ask for verbal confirmation that the customer received the item instead of having them sign for it. 

    Adapting to the pandemic

    This isn’t the first time Apple has modified its operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Earlier this year, the tech giant said its reopened stores would have “Express” windows outdoors where customers could pick up orders or get items repaired.

    Apple says its new delivery option is available for “eligible in-stock items.” 

    Consumers who don’t need an item within two hours can choose the company’s free next-day delivery option, which is available for any in-stock Mac, iPad, iPhone, Apple TV, or Apple Watch. The company notes that customers can get free two-day delivery on “almost everything else.” 

    Apple has announced that it will be offering two-hour shipping on items in its stores for a limited time. The company said the new service, which costs $5,...
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    Apple rolls out new App Store privacy labels

    The company wants to give users more information about what data apps have on them

    Apple is launching new “App Privacy” labels in the App Store with the aim of providing greater transparency about its app privacy practices. 

    The company announced its plan to add these privacy “nutrition labels” back in June at WWDC. At the time, Apple said it wanted to better inform consumers about the privacy practices of apps on the App Store. 

    The App Privacy labels give iOS users up-to-date information on each app’s privacy practices. Apple said the summaries of privacy practices are meant "to help you decide if it works for you."

    Three categories

    Labels are broken into three data collection categories: “data used to track you,” “data linked to you,” and “data not linked to you.”

    “Data linked to you” refers to any data that can be used to identify a user. An app would have this type of data in cases where the user supplied their name, age, or other information when creating a profile on an app. Apps will also have “data linked to you” if they collect specific information about you, such as your birthday or previous work history.

    “Data not linked to you” refers to diagnostic data, such as location data or browsing history, collected by an app but not able to be tied to the user.

    “Data used to track you” means that user or device data was linked and collected from an app, website, or advertising profile. This category also refers to device and user data shared by the app with data brokers. 

    “A transparent overview of an app’s privacy practices is key to building trust with potential users,” the company said. “Developers now have the opportunity to detail their app’s privacy practices right in the App Store for users to review, including the types of data the apps might collect, whether that data is shared with third parties, and the option for users to opt out.”

    ‘Personal data’ definition

    Apple has also updated its privacy policy, making it easier to read and giving users a clearer picture of what Apple considers personal data. 

    “At Apple, we believe strongly in fundamental privacy rights — and that those fundamental rights should not differ depending on where you live in the world. Thatʼs why we treat any data that relates to an identified or identifiable individual or that is linked or linkable to them by Apple as ‘personal data,’ no matter where the individual lives,” the company said. 

    “This means that data that directly identifies you — such as your name — is personal data, and also data that does not directly identify you, but that can reasonably be used to identify you — such as the serial number of your device — is personal data.” 

    Apple is launching new “App Privacy” labels in the App Store with the aim of providing greater transparency about its app privacy practices. The compan...
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    Apple to pay $113 million to settle latest ‘batterygate’ investigation

    States argue that the company knew it could profit off of consumers who thought they needed a new phone

    Apple has agreed to pay $113 million to settle lawsuits stemming from the battery throttling scandal, better known as “batterygate.” 

    In 2017, a barrage of customers accused Apple of deliberately slowing the speed of older iPhones. Apple said the feature was designed to protect and extend the lifespan of aging devices, but customers contended that Apple was in the wrong because it didn’t state upfront that it would slow the speed of older models.

    To make amends, Apple offered $29 battery replacements and tweaked its settings to make its battery-management practices more clear to users -- but that didn’t stop the lawsuits from pouring in. The company agreed to a $500 million class action settlement earlier this year, and now it has agreed to a second settlement. 

    The tech giant will pay an additional $113 million as part of a settlement with 34 states. In this suit, state attorneys general argued that Apple concealed the battery-throttling feature from iPhone owners knowing that it could profit off of consumers who thought they needed to buy an entirely new iPhone rather than just a new battery.

    “Big Tech must stop manipulating consumers and tell them the whole truth about their practices and products,” Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich said in a statement. “I’m committed to holding these goliath technology companies to account if they conceal the truth from their users.”

    Apple has not admitted wrongdoing, and the settlement doesn’t require it to do so. 

    Apple has agreed to pay $113 million to settle lawsuits stemming from the battery throttling scandal, better known as “batterygate.” In 2017, a barrage...
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