Millions of consumers now use Amazon.com to purchase everything from books to cookware, so it's no surprise scammers have latched onto the online retailer as a tool in their phishing schemes.

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) said it has received reports of emails, appearing to come from Amazon.com customer service, with the subject line "Thank you for your order." The message has the Amazon.com logo and looks legitimate in other ways, at least on the surface.

The email lists an order number, total price, and a link to view the order. Someone receiving the message who had not ordered anything might click the link to see what he has mistakenly been charged for. Someone who had actually ordered something from Amazon might click the link because the price and item description is wrong.

Anyone who clicks on the link would be sent to a fake site where an attempt would be made to steal her personal information.

It goes without saying you shouldn't click on the link. Amazon.com requests that anyone receiving one of these bogus emails forward it to stop-spoofing@amazon.com.

Amazon.com said it never asks for Social Security numbers, tax identification numbers or other personal information as part of its transactions. It also said it never asks customers to confirm account information by clicking on an email link.