PhotoIf you didn't filed a federal income tax return for 2012, you may be poorer for it.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has refunds totaling $950 million for an estimated one million taxpayers. All you have to do to collect is file a 2012 tax return no later than this year's April tax deadline.

"A surprising number of people across the country overlook claiming tax refunds each year. But the clock is ticking for taxpayers who didn’t file a 2012 federal income tax return, leaving nearly $1 billion in refunds unclaimed," said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. "We especially encourage students and others who didn't earn much money to look into this situation because they may still be entitled to a refund. Don't forget, there’s no penalty for filing a late return if you’re due a refund.”

The median for potential refunds for 2012 is estimated at $718, with half being worth more and half less.

Act fast

The law provides most taxpayers with a three-year window of opportunity for claiming a refund if they haven't filed. If no return is filed to claim a refund within that period, the money goes to the U.S. Treasury.

There is a catch of sorts. Your 2012 refund may be withheld if you haven't filed tax returns for 2013 and 2014. And, it will be applied to any amounts you owed the feds or your state tax agency, and may be used to offset unpaid child support or past due federal debts, such as student loans.

Here's a breakdown, by state, of available refunds:

State or District

Estimated

Number of

Individuals

Median

Potential

Refund

Total

Potential

Refunds*

Alabama

18,700

$713

$16,684,000

Alaska

4,700

$834

$5,019,000

Arizona

26,000

$631

$22,078,000

Arkansas

10,100

$692

$8,987,000

California

94,900

$656

$82,782,000

Colorado

19,300

$667

$16,961,000

Connecticut

11,800

$803

$11,511,000

Delaware

4,200

$771

$4,012,000

District of Columbia

3,600

$741

$3,343,000

Florida

64,700

$721

$58,598,000

Georgia

34,300

$642

$29,395,000

Hawaii

6,500

$740

$6,091,000

Idaho

4,400

$607

$3,652,000

Illinois

40,300

$782

$38,893,000

Indiana

22,000

$751

$20,448,000

Iowa

10,800

$764

$9,917,000

Kansas

11,000

$699

$9,811,000

Kentucky

13,500

$746

$12,122,000

Louisiana

20,600

$726

$19,767,000

Maine

4,100

$651

$3,432,000

Maryland

22,600

$722

$21,108,000

Massachusetts

20,600

$767

$19,714,000

Michigan

34,600

$733

$32,118,000

Minnesota

15,200

$657

$12,981,000

Mississippi

10,800

$646

$9,325,000

Missouri

22,800

$675

$19,886,000

Montana

3,500

$669

$3,083,000

Nebraska

5,400

$695

$4,720,000

Nevada

12,500

$704

$11,280,000

New Hampshire

4,400

$804

$4,284,000

New Jersey

30,600

$803

$30,016,000

New Mexico

7,700

$715

$7,181,000

New York

57,600

$796

$56,310,000

North Carolina

29,700

$619

$24,469,000

North Dakota

2,600

$831

$2,682,000

Ohio

37,300

$717

$33,321,000

Oklahoma

18,500

$744

$17,411,000

Oregon

15,700

$620

$12,820,000

Pennsylvania

40,200

$796

$38,243,000

Rhode Island

3,200

$777

$3,014,000

South Carolina

12,500

$633

$10,648,000

South Dakota

2,800

$785

$2,707,000

Tennessee

19,700

$702

$17,318,000

Texas

96,400

$771

$93,998,000

Utah

7,400

$640

$6,316,000

Vermont

2,000

$698

$1,689,000

Virginia

29,000

$698

$26,297,000

Washington

26,100

$764

$25,292,000

West Virginia

5,100

$800

$4,870,000

Wisconsin

12,900

$647

$10,837,000

Wyoming

2,700

$851

$2,908,000

Totals

1,037,600

$718

$950,349,000

* Excluding the Earned Income Tax Credit and other credits.


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