PhotoHome prices continued to rise in June on both a year-over-year and month-over-month basis.

 

CoreLogic reports its Home Price Index (HPI), which track home prices nationwide shows sales -- including distressed sales -- rose by 6.5% in June from the same month a year earlier. That marks 40 consecutive months of year-over-year increases in home prices nationally.

 

Distressed sales include short sales and real estate-owned (REO) transactions.

 

On a month-over-month basis, home prices -- including distressed sales -- rose 1.7% from May's level.

 

New peaks reached

 

Including distressed sales, 35 states and the District of Columbia were at or within 10% of their peak prices in June. Fifteen states -- Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Hawaii, Iowa, Kentucky, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas and Wyoming -- and D.C. reached new price peaks.

 

Excluding distressed sales, home prices posted a year-over-year gain of 6.4% , and increased by 1.4% month-over-month. Excluding distressed sales, only Massachusetts (-1.5%) and Louisiana (-0.1%) showed year-over-year depreciation in June.

 

“The tightness of the for-sale inventory varies across cities. Throughout the U.S., the months’ supply was 4.8 months in the CoreLogic home-listing data for June, but varied greatly across cities. In San Jose and Denver, there was only 1.6 months’ supply of homes on the market, whereas Philadelphia had a 7 months’ supply and Providence had a 6.6 months’ supply,” said Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. “The stronger appreciation was registered in cities with limited inventory and strong homebuyer activity, such as San Jose and Denver.”

 

Report highlights

 

  • Including distressed sales, the 5 states with the highest home price appreciation were: Colorado (+9.8%), Washington (+8.9%), New York (+8.3%), South Carolina (+8%) and Nevada (+8%).
  • Excluding distressed sales, the 5 states with the highest home price appreciation were: Colorado (+9.3%), New York (+8.5%), Washington (+8.3%), Oregon (+8.2%) and Nevada (+7.9%).
  • Including distressed sales, only 4 states experienced home price depreciation: Massachusetts (-5%), Connecticut (-0.6%), Louisiana (-0.4%) and Mississippi (-0.3%).
  • Including distressed transactions, the peak-to-current change in the national HPI (from April 2006 to June 2015) was -7.4%. Excluding distressed transactions, the peak-to-current change for the same period was -4%.
  • The 5 states with the largest peak-to-current declines, including distressed transactions, were: Nevada (-32.2%), Florida (-28.7%), Rhode Island (-26.5%), Arizona (-25.8%) and Maryland (-21.2%).
  • Of the top 100 Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs) measured by population, 93 showed year-over-year increases. The seven CBSAs that showed year-over-year declines were: Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Md. (-8%); Boston, Mass. (-4.4%); Camden, N.J. (-0.5%); Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Conn, (-0.1%); New Haven-Milford, Conn. (-1.8%); New Orleans-Metairie, La. (-6.1%) and Worcester, Mass.-Conn. (-7%).

 

“The current cycle of home price appreciation is closing in on its fourth year with no apparent end in sight,” said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. “Pent-up buying demand and affordability, together with higher consumer confidence buoyed by a more robust labor market, are a potent mix fueling a 6.5% jump in home prices through June with more increases likely to come.”

 

Looking ahead

 

The CoreLogic HPI forecast indicates home prices -- including distressed sales -- will increase by 0.6% month-over-month from June 2015 to July 2015 and by 4.5% on a year-over-year basis from June 2015 to June 2016.

 

Excluding distressed sales, home prices are projected to increase by 0.5% month-over-month from June 2015 to July 2015 and by 4.2% year-over-year from June 2015 to June 2016.

 

 

 


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