PhotoNow that the Federal Reserve has hiked its short-term interest rate for only the second time in a decade, the interest rate on your credit card balance is likely to go up some.

And if the Fed follows through on its plans for as many as three additional hikes in 2017, that rate could go up even more. So finding a card that offers the lowest possible rate is a good idea.

We checked with three credit card comparison sites to see which low-interest credit cards they were recommending. At CreditCards.com, the editors like the Core Visa credit card from PNC Bank.

"When it comes to low-interest cards, math wins," said CreditCards.com editor-in-chief Daniel P. Ray. "And the PNC Core Visa has an outstanding regular APR that starts at just 10.24%, making it best in its class."

Five points below the average

Ray points out the PNC Core Visa not only offers the lowest interest rate, it's nearly five percentage points below the national average for all credit cards.

The card, which is a relatively new entry to the credit card market, also scores points for its 15-month 0% interest rate on purchases and balance transfers.

Meanwhile, a top choice at NerdWallet is the Citi Diamond Preferred card. It's interest rate ranges from 12.24% to 22.24%, with consumers with the best credit getting the lowest rate.

21 months at 0%

In addition, the Citi Diamond Preferred offers 21 months of 0% interest on purchases, meaning it would cost nothing to finance a major purchase – for example, a new refrigerator.

The card also offers a 21-month 0% interest period on balance transfers, but charges a fee of 3% of the transferred balance.

At CardHub, the editors like the Capital One VentureOne Rewards card when it comes to low interest. It matches the Citi Diamond Preferred's rates of 12.24% to 22.24%.

The VentureOne also provides 0% interest on purchases for the first 12 months. It's also a travel rewards card, paying 1.25 miles for every dollar spent on purchases. One hundred miles equals $1 in travel rewards.

Of course, interest rates are of little importance if you can manage to pay off the credit card balance each month. That way you'll never pay any interest, no matter the rate.


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