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Digital Products recalls iLive self-balancing scooters/hoverboards

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat, posing a fire hazard

Digital Products International (DPI) of St. Louis, Mo., is recalling about 8,700 iLive self-balancing scooters/hoverboards.

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat, posing a risk of the hoverboards smoking, catching fire and/or exploding.

The company has received one report of the battery pack overheating and smoking. No injuries or property damage have been reported.

This recall involves iLive self-balancing scooters, commonly referred to as hoverboards, with model numbers GSB56BC, GSB56RC, GSB65BUC, GSB56WC and GSB56GDC. The model number is printed on the bottom of the unit.

The hoverboards have two wheels, one at either end of a platform, and are powered by lithium-ion battery packs. “iLive” is printed in the center of the hoverboard’s top surface as well as underneath the top deck, facing the ground.

The hoverboards were sold in black, red, white, blue and gold. Some units were sold with a black carrying case.

The hoverboards, manufactured in China, were sold at Ace Hardware and hh gregg stores nationwide, Heartland America catalogs and online at AceHardware.com and hhgregg.com from April 2016, through March 2017, for between $170 and $200.

What to do

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled scooters/hoverboards and contact Digital Products (DPI) for instructions on how to obtain a free UL2272-certified replacement unit.

Consumers may contact DPI at 800-311-9263 Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (CT) or online at www.iliveelectronics.com and click on “Product Safety and Recalls” for more information.

Digital Products International (DPI) of St. Louis, Mo., is recalling about 8,700 iLive self-balancing scooters/hoverboards.The lithium-ion battery pack...

Dollar Mania recalls Sonic Smart Wheels self-balancing scooters/hoverboards

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat

Dollar Mania of Bossier City, La., is recalling about 1,000 self-balancing scooters/hoverboards.

The lithium-ion battery packs in the self-balancing scooters/hoverboards can overheat, posing a risk of the products smoking, catching fire and/or exploding.

The firm has received one report of a self-balancing scooter/hoverboard catching fire in Louisiana in 2017 resulting in approximately $40,000 of property damage to a consumer’s home. No injuries have been reported.

This recall involves Sonic Smart Wheels self-balancing scooters, commonly referred to as hoverboards, with model number S-01 or SBW666SL printed on the bottom of the unit.

The hoverboards have two wheels at either end of a platform and are powered by lithium-ion batteries.

The hoverboards were sold in black, blue, green, red, white and yellow and have an “S” printed in the center of the wheel caps.

The self-balancing scooters/hoverboards, manufactured in China, were sold exclusively at Dollar Mania stores in Bossier City and Shreveport, La., from August 2015 through December 2016 for about $200.

What to do

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled self-balancing scooters/hoverboards and contact Dollar Mania for instructions on returning the hoverboard to receive a free UL2272-certified replacement unit.

Consumers may contact Dollar Mania toll-free at 844-333-4457 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. (CT) Monday through Friday or online on the Dollar Mania Facebook page for more information. 

Dollar Mania of Bossier City, La., is recalling about 1,000 self-balancing scooters/hoverboards.The lithium-ion battery packs in the self-balancing sco...

iRover recalls self-balancing scooters/hoverboards

The lithium-ion battery packs in the self-balancing scooters/hoverboards can overheat

iRover of Fair Lawn, N.J., is recalling about 2,800 self-balancing scooters/hoverboards.

The lithium-ion battery packs in the self-balancing scooters/hoverboards can overheat, posing a risk of smoking, catching fire and/or exploding.

There have been two reports of the battery packs in the recalled self-balancing scooters/hoverboards smoking and overheating. No injuries or property damage have been reported.

This recall involves iRover self-balancing scooters, commonly referred to as hoverboards, model numbers 87645 and 87644.

The hoverboards have two wheels at either end of a platform and are powered by lithium-ion battery packs. The boards have “iRover” printed on the front outer casing and come in black and white.

The model number is listed on the bottom of the unit.

The hoverboards, manufactured in China, were sold at Fallas Stores of Los Angeles, California, and T.J. Maxx and Marshalls stores nationwide from December 2015, through December 2016, for between $300 and $400.

What to do

Consumers should immediately stop using these recalled scooters/hoverboards and contact iRover for instructions on returning their hoverboard for a free UL2272-certified replacement unit.

Consumers may contact iRover toll-free at 888-348-6434 from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. (ET) Monday through Friday or online at www.iroverus.com and click on Recall Notice for more information.

 

 

 

iRover of Fair Lawn, N.J., is recalling about 2,800 self-balancing scooters/hoverboards.The lithium-ion battery packs in the self-balancing scooters/ho...

Springs Window Fashions recalls lithium batteries sold with motorized window coverings

The batteries can overheat, leak or discharge, posing burn hazards.

Springs Window Fashions of Middleton, Wisc., is recalling about 61,000 Zeus brand “Freedom Power” lithium AA batteries sold with motorized window coverings.

The batteries can overheat, leak or discharge, posing fire and burn hazards.

The company has received four reports that the batteries overheated, leaked or discharged, including one report of a minor burn.

This recall involves custom motorized window coverings that were sold with Zeus brand AA lithium batteries. Window coverings with batteries included in this recall were sold under the Bali, Graber, and Signature Series brands, and as private labeled products of Blinds Galore and JCP Home.

The custom window coverings include cellular, roller, Roman (fabric and natural shades), pleated, sheer and layered shades, and wood blinds.

Only Zeus brand AA lithium batteries are included in this recall.

The batteries, manufactured in China, were sold at Budget Blinds, Gotcha Covered, Home Depot, Lowe’s, JC Penney, Menards and independent Graber dealers nationwide, and online at Blinds.com from December 2015, through November 2016, for between $250 and $1,000.

What to do

Consumers should immediately stop using and remove the Zeus brand batteries from the window coverings. Springs Window Fashions will ship batteries and instructions directly to consumers.

Consumers may contact Springs Window Fashions at 800-221-6352 from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. (ET) Monday through Friday, by email at motorization.support@springswindowfashions.com or online at www.SpringsWindowFashions.com and click on “Product Recall Information” for more information.

 

 

Springs Window Fashions of Middleton, Wisc., is recalling about 61,000 Zeus brand “Freedom Power” lithium AA batteries sold with motorized window coverings...

Sony expands recall of VAIO laptop computer battery packs

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat

Sony Electronics of San Diego, Calif., is expanding its June 2016 recall of Panasonic battery packs used in Sony Electronics laptop computers.

Another 700 battery packs are being recalled. About 1,700 were previously recalled.

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat, posing burn and fire hazards.

No incidents or injuries have been reported.

This expanded recall involves Panasonic lithium-ion battery packs installed in 18 models of Sony’s VAIO Series laptop computers.

The Panasonic battery packs were manufactured with the laptop and battery packs were sold separately or installed by Sony as part of a repair.

Panasonic battery packs included in this recall have model number VGP-BPS26 and part numbers 1-853-237-11 and 1-853-237-21 printed on the back of the battery pack.

Recalled model numbers for the Sony VAIO laptop computer are:

 

       Sony VAIO Series laptop computer model numbers

SVE14A1

SVE14A2

SVE14A3

SVE1413

SVE1511

SVE1512

SVE1513

SVE1513APXS

SVE1513BCXS

SVE1513JCXW

SVE1513KCXS

SVE1513MCXB

SVE1513MCXW

SVE1513MPXS

SVE1513RCXB

SVE1513RCXS

SVE1513RCXW

SVE1513TCXW

SVE15132CXW

SVE15134CXP

SVE15134CXS

SVE15134CXW

SVE15135CXW

SVE151390X

SVE1712

SVE1713

SVE171390X

VPCCA1

VPCCA2

VPCCA3

VPCCB1

VPCCB2

VPCCB3

VPCCB4

VPCEH1

VPCEH2

VPCEH3

VPCEJ1

VPCEJ2

 

Battery packs previously identified as not affected by the June 2016 recall are included in this expanded announcement.

The battery packs, manufactured in China, were sold at Best Buy, Sony retail stores, other consumer electronic stores nationwide and online at www.store.sony.com and other websites from February 2013, through October 2013, for between $550 and $1,000 as part of Sony VAIO laptops and for about $170 for battery packs sold separately.

What to do

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled battery packs, power off the laptop, remove the battery and follow instructions to obtain a free replacement. Until a replacement battery pack is received, consumers should use the laptop by plugging in AC power only.

Consumers may contact Sony Electronics toll-free at 888-476-6988 from 8 a.m. to 12 a.m. (ET) Monday through Friday or 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. (ET) Saturday and Sunday, or online at www.sony.com, click on “Support” and then “Support Alerts” for more information.

 

 

Sony Electronics of San Diego, Calif., is expanding its June 2016 recall of Panasonic battery packs used in Sony Electronics laptop computers.Another 7...

HP expands recall of batteries for HP and Compaq notebook computers

The batteries can overheat, posing fire and burn hazards

HP of Palo Alto, Calif., is expanding its recall of lithium-ion batteries used in HP and Compaq notebook computers to about 101,000 from the 41,000 recalled in June 2016.

The batteries can overheat, posing fire and burn hazards.

The company has received one additional report of the battery overheating, melting and charring and causing about $1,000 in property damage. There were seven reports in the earlier recall

This expanded recall involves lithium-ion batteries containing Panasonic cells that are used in HP notebook computers. The batteries are compatible with HP, Compaq, HP ProBook, HP ENVY, Compaq Presario, and HP Pavilion notebook computers.

HP has expanded the number of recalled batteries, which were shipped with notebook computers sold between March 2013, and October 2016.

The black batteries measure about 8 to 10.5 inches long, 2 inches wide and about 1 inch high. The battery bar code is printed on the back of the battery. “HP Notebook Battery” and the model number are printed on the battery.

The batteries included in this expanded recall have bar codes starting with: 6BZLU, 6CGFK, 6CGFQ, 6CZMB, 6DEMA, 6DEMH, 6DGAL and 6EBVA.

The batteries, manufactured in China, were sold at Best Buy, Walmart, Costco, Sam’s Club and authorized dealers nationwide and online at www.hp.com and other websites from March 2013, through October 2016, for between $300 and $1,700. The batteries were also sold separately for between $50 and $90.

What to do

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled batteries, remove them from the notebook computers and contact HP for a free replacement battery. Until a replacement battery is received, consumers should use the notebook computer by plugging it into AC power only.

Consumers may contact HP toll-free at 888-202-4320 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. (CT) Monday through Friday or online at www.HP.com/go/batteryprogram2016 or www.hp.com and click “Recalls” at the bottom of the page for more information.

 

 

 

HP of Palo Alto, Calif., is expanding its recall of lithium-ion batteries used in HP and Compaq notebook computers to about 101,000 from the 41,000 recalle...

Boosted recalls electric skateboards

The lithium ion battery pack can overheat and smoke

Boosted Inc. of Mountain View, Calif., is recalling about 3,300 electric-powered skateboards sold in the U.S. and Canada.

The lithium ion battery pack can overheat and smoke, posing a fire hazard.

The company has received two reports of the battery packs overheating and smoking. No injuries have been reported.

This recall involves 2nd Generation Boosted Dual+ electric skateboards with lithium ion battery packs. “Boosted” is printed on the wooden skateboards. Serial numbers that start with S2634 through S2644 are located on a white sticker on the bottom of the boards.

The battery packs were sold as original equipment with the skateboards and are attached to the bottom of the board in a black thermoplastic enclosure.

Model number B2SR and “Boosted Lithium” are printed on the battery pack. The battery packs have an orange power button.

The skateboards, manufactured in China, were sold online at boostedboards.com from September 2016, through November 2016, for about $1,500.

What to do

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled skateboards and contact Boosted for a free replacement battery pack.

Consumers may contact Boosted toll-free at 844-395-0070 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. PT Monday through Friday or online at https://boostedboards.com and click on Battery Pack Recall for more information.

 

 

Boosted Inc. of Mountain View, Calif., is recalling about 3,300 electric-powered skateboards sold in the U.S. and Canada.The lithium ion battery pack c...

Toshiba expands recall of laptop computer battery packs

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat

Toshiba America Information Systems of Irvine, Calif., is expanding its March 2016 recall of Panasonic battery packs used in Toshiba laptop computers by about 83,000.

Some 91,000 units were recalled in March 2016. In addition, 10,000 were sold in Canada and 5,000 in Mexico.

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat, posing burn and fire hazards to consumers.

The firm has received five reports of the battery pack overheating and melting, including one additional report since the first recall announcement. No injuries have been reported.

This expanded recall involves Panasonic lithium-ion battery packs installed in 41 models of Toshiba Satellite laptops, including the Satellite models affected by the March 2016 recall.

Toshiba has expanded the number of battery packs to include those sold between June 2011 and November 2016. The battery packs also were sold separately and installed by Toshiba as part of a repair. Battery packs included in this recall have part numbers that begin with G71C (G71C*******). Part numbers are printed on the battery pack.

A complete list of battery pack part numbers included in this recall can be found at http://go.toshiba.com/battery.

Battery packs previously identified as not affected by the March 2016 recall are included in this expanded announcement.

The batteries, manufactured in China, were sold at Office Depot, Staples and other electronics stores nationwide, and online at Toshibadirect.com and other websites from June 2011, through November 2016, for between $500 and $1,000 for the laptop and between $70 and $130 for the battery pack.

What to do

Consumers should immediately go to the firm’s website and click on the battery pack utility link in the first shadowed box on the page.

Consumers also can perform a manual check using the laptop and battery pack’s model, part and serial numbers. If it is part of the recall, consumers should power off the laptop, remove the battery and follow the instructions to obtain a free replacement battery pack.

Until a replacement battery pack is received, consumers should use the laptop by plugging into AC power only.

Consumers may contact Toshiba toll-free at 866-224-1346 any day between 5 a.m. and 11 p.m. (PT), online at http://go.toshiba.com/battery or at www.us.toshiba.com and click on “Consumer Notices” under the Support heading at the bottom of the page.

 

 

Toshiba America Information Systems of Irvine, Calif., is expanding its March 2016 recall of Panasonic battery packs used in Toshiba laptop computers by ab...

World Trading recalls Orbit self-balancing scooters/hoverboards

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat

World Trading of Valencia, Calif., is recalling about 1,900 self-balancing scooters/hoverboards.

The lithium-ion battery packs in the self-balancing scooters/hoverboards can overheat, posing a risk of smoking, catching fire and/or exploding.

No incidents or injuries are reported.

This recall involves Orbit brand self-balancing scooters/hoverboards. The hoverboards have two wheels at either end of a platform and are powered by lithium ion battery packs. Orbit brand hoverboards were sold in black, blue, gold, green, red and white. “Orbit” is printed on a black sticker on the underside of the hoverboard.

The scooters/hoverboards, manufactured in China, were sold at Evine’s televised shopping programs and online at evine.com in December 2015, for about $300.

What to do

Consumers should immediately stop using these recalled products and contact World Trading to exchange their hoverboard for a free UL-certified replacement hoverboard.

Consumers may contact World Trading toll-free at 877-498-8697 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (PT) Monday through Friday or by email at support@worldtrading23.com for more information.

 

 

World Trading of Valencia, Calif., is recalling about 1,900 self-balancing scooters/hoverboards.The lithium-ion battery packs in the self-balancing sco...

Denon recalls rechargeable battery packs

The battery can overheat, posing a fire and burn hazards

Denon Electronics of Mahwah, N.J., is recalling about 3,600 lithium-ion rechargeable battery packs sold in the U.S. and Canada.

The battery can overheat, posing a fire and burn hazards.

No incidents or injuries have been reported.

This recall involves Denon’s HEOS 1 Go Pack lithium-ion rechargeable battery packs for wireless speakers. Only HEOS 1 Go Packs with a 10-character alpha-numeric serial number beginning with 5 or 601G91 and ending with 3517 through 4004 are included in the recall.

The battery packs are black or white, hexagon-shaped and have four blue LED lights and a power button. HEOS, the model and serial numbers are printed on the bottom. Only the speaker battery is being recalled.

The battery packs, manufactured in China, were sold at Best Buy (Magnolia), Brookstone and online at BestBuy.com and Amazon.com from May 2015, through June 2016, for about $100.

What to do

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled battery packs and contact Denon for a free replacement battery pack, including shipping.

Consumers may contact Denon toll-free at 844 -759-1987 from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. (ET) Monday through Friday and 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. (ET) on Saturday, or online at https://usa.denon.com.

 

 

Denon Electronics of Mahwah, N.J., is recalling about 3,600 lithium-ion rechargeable battery packs sold in the U.S. and Canada.The battery can overheat...

Ten firms recall self-balancing scooters/hoverboards

The lithium-ion battery packs in the hoverboards can overheat

Ten firms are recalling about 501,000 self-balancing scooters/hoverboards.

 

The lithium-ion battery packs in the self-balancing scooters/hoverboards can overheat, posing a risk of the products smoking, catching fire and/or exploding.

 

There have been at least 99 incidents reports of the battery packs in self-balancing scooters/hoverboards overheating, sparking, smoking, catching fire and/or exploding including reports of burn injuries and property damage.

 

This recall involves self-balancing scooters, commonly referred to as hoverboards. They have two wheels at either end of a platform and are powered by lithium-ion battery packs. Recalled self-balancing scooters include the following retailers, brands and online firms: 
 

Company

Number of Units

Brand/Model

Sold

Firm’s Recall

 

Digital Gadgets LLC, of Monroe, N.J.

 

 

16,000

Hover-Way/Model # HWSBB601-R

16-213

 

Hoverboard LLC, of Scottsdale, Ariz.

 

70,000

Powerboard

16-210

 

Hype Wireless, of 
Edison, N.J.

25,000

Hype Roam

16-217

Keenford Ltd., of Hong Kong

84,000

iMoto

16-216

PTX Performance Products USA of Irvine, CA

 

4,900

Airwalk Self Balancing Electric Scooter

16-208

Razor USA LLC, of Cerritos, Calif.

 

 

28,000

Hovertrax

16-215

Swagway LLC, of South Bend, Ind.

267,000

Swagway X1

16-211

Yuka Clothing, of Miami, Fla.

 

800

Wheeli, 2Wheelz, Back to the Future, Mobile Tech, Hover Shark, NWS, X Glider and X Rider

16-209

 

Retail Stores:

 

Boscov’s, of Reading, Pa.

1,300

Orbit

16-212

 

Online Retailers:

 

Overstock.com, of Salt Lake City, Utah

 

4,300

All hoverboards sold on Overstock.com

16-214

 

 

What to do

 

Consumers should immediately stop using these recalled products, which were manufactured in China, and contact the recalling company to return their hoverboard for a full refund, a free repair or a free replacement depending on the model.

 

Consumers may contact the recalling companies through their websites and call centers listed above.

Ten firms are recalling about 501,000 self-balancing scooters/hoverboards. The lithium-ion battery packs in the self-balancing scooters/hoverboards...

Hype Wireless recalls self-balancing scooters/hoverboards

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat

Hype Wireless of Edison, N.J., is recalling about 25,000 self-balancing scooters/hoverboards.

 

The lithium-ion battery packs in the self-balancing scooters/hoverboards can overheat, posing a risk of the products smoking, catching fire and/or exploding.

 

The company has received one report of a self-balancing scooter/hoverboard overheating and smoking. There have been no reports of injuries or property damage.

 

This recall involves Hype Roam brand self-balancing scooters, commonly referred to as hoverboards. The hoverboards have two wheels at either end of a platform and are powered by lithium-ion battery packs. Roam brand hoverboards were sold in black, red and blue. Roam is printed on a sticker attached to the undercarriage of the scooter.

 

The hoverboards, manufactured in China, were sold at Bed Bath and Beyond, Sports Chalet, VMZ Enterprises LLC and Trans World Entertainment stores nationwide and online from November 2015, through January 2016, for about $500.

 

What to do

 

Consumers should immediately stop using these recalled products and contact Hype Wireless to exchange their hoverboard for a free UL-compliant replacement.

 

Consumers may contact Hype Wireless toll-free at 866-449-7186 from 9:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. (ET) Monday through Friday, or online at www.hyperoam.com and click on Recall for more information.

 

 

Hype Wireless of Edison, N.J., is recalling about 25,000 self-balancing scooters/hoverboards. The lithium-ion battery packs in the self-balancing s...

HP Recalls Batteries for HP and Compaq notebook computers

The battery packs can overheat, posing fire and burn hazards

HP Inc., of Palo Alto, Calif., is recalling about 48,100 HP lithium-ion batteries in the U.S., Canada and Mexico.

 

The battery packs can overheat, posing fire and burn hazards.

 

The company has received seven reports of battery packs overheating, melting or charring, including four reports of property damage of about $4,000 total.

 

This recall involves lithium-ion batteries containing Panasonic cells that are used in HP notebook computers. The batteries are compatible with HP, Compaq, HP ProBook, HP ENVY, Compaq Presario, and HP Pavilion notebook computers.

 

The black batteries measure about 8 inches long, 2 inches wide and about 1 inch high. The battery bar code is printed on the back of the battery. “HP Notebook Battery” and the model number are printed on the battery.

 

The batteries included in this recall have the following barcodes: 6BZLU, 6CGFK, 6CGFQ, 6CZMB, 6DEMA, 6DEMH, 6DGAL and 6EBVA.

 

The batteries, manufactured in China, were sold at Best Buy, Wal-Mart, and Costco and authorized dealers nationwide and online at www.hp.com from March 2013, through August 2015. The batteries were sold with notebook computers for between $300 and $1,700. The batteries were also sold separately for between $50 and $90.

 

What to do

 

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled batteries, remove them from the notebook computers and contact HP for a free replacement battery.

 

Consumers may contact HP toll-free at 888-202-4320 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. (CT) Monday through Friday or online at the HP Battery Recall website directly at www.HP.com/go/batteryprogram2016 or www.hp.com and click “Recalls” at the bottom of the page for more information.

 

 

HP Inc., of Palo Alto, Calif., is recalling about 48,100 HP lithium-ion batteries in the U.S., Canada and Mexico. The battery packs can overheat, p...

Sony recalls VAIO laptop computer battery packs

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat

Sony Electronics of San Diego, Calif., is recalling about 1,700 Panasonic battery packs used in Sony Electronics laptop computers in the U.S. and Canada.

 

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat, posing burn and fire hazards.

 

No incidents or injuries have been reported.

 

This recall involves Panasonic lithium-ion battery packs installed in 18 models of Sony’s VAIO Series laptop computers. The Panasonic battery packs were also sold separately and installed by Sony as part of repairs.

 

Panasonic battery packs included in this recall have model number VGP-BPS26 and part numbers 1-853-237-11 and 1-853-237-21. Panasonic battery pack model and part numbers are printed on the back of the battery pack.

 

Recalled model numbers for the Sony VAIO Series laptop computers are:

 

       Sony VAIO Series laptop computer model numbers

SVE15132CXW

SVE1513KCXS

SVE15134CXP

SVE1513MCXB

SVE15134CXS

SVE1513MCXW

SVE15134CXW

SVE1513MPXS

SVE15135CXW

SVE1513RCXB

SVE151390X

SVE1513RCXS

SVE1513APXS

SVE1513RCXW

SVE1513BCXS

SVE1513TCXW

SVE1513JCXW

SVE171390X

 

 

The battery packs, manufactured in China, were sold at Best Buy, Sony retail stores, other consumer electronic stores nationwide and online at www.store.sony.com and other websites from February 2013, through October 2013, for between $550 and $1,000 as part of Sony VAIO laptops and for about $170 for battery packs sold separately.

 

What to do

 

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled battery packs, power off the laptop, remove the battery and follow instructions to obtain a free replacement. Until a replacement battery pack is received, consumers can use the laptop by plugging in the AC power only.

 

Consumers may contact Sony Electronics toll-free at 888-476-6988 from 8 a.m. to 12 a.m. (ET) Monday through Friday or 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. (ET) Saturday and Sunday or online at www.sony.com, click on “Support” and then “Support Alerts” for more information.

 

Sony Electronics of San Diego, Calif., is recalling about 1,700 Panasonic battery packs used in Sony Electronics laptop computers in the U.S. and Canada....

Brunton Outdoors recalls battery packs

The power packs’ lithium ion polymer batteries can overheat and catch fire

Brunton Outdoor Inc., of Louisville, Colo., is recalling about 1,100 rechargeable battery packs in the U.S and Canada.

 

The power packs’ lithium ion polymer batteries can overheat and catch fire during charging, posing a fire hazard.

 

The firm has received two reports of battery packs overheating and catching fire. One incident resulted in about $25,000 in property damage. In another, a garage burned down with property and smoke damage to the adjacent residence. No injuries have been reported.

 

This recall involves Brunton’s Impel and Impel 2 rechargeable, portable battery packs that are used to charge cell phones, tablets, laptops and other devices. The Impel battery came in a rubberized shell in dark gray with orange or blue and the Impel 2 in light gray with black trim.

 

The battery packs can be plugged into an A/C wall outlet, a 12 volt car charger or an attachable solar panel for recharging. They measure about 7.5 inches long by 7 inches wide by 1 inch thick. The lithium ion polymer battery packs have 16, and 19 volt outputs and a USB port.

 

The Impel model also has a 12 volt output. Brunton is embossed on the top of the battery pack, along with the power button and five LED lights.

 

The battery packs, manufactured in China, were sold at Adorama, Austin Canoe & Kayak, Moontrail, REI, The Clymb and other outdoor equipment retailers nationwide and online at www.amazon.com, www.backcountry.com, www.bhphotovideo.com, www.forestry-suppliers.com, and www.opticsplanet.com from February 2011, through May 2015, for about $300.

 

What to do

 

Consumers may contact Brunton Outdoor at 800-443-4871 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. (ET) Monday through Friday or online at http://www.brunton.com/ and click on Impel Charger Product Recall the top or bottom of the page for more information.

 

 

Brunton Outdoor Inc., of Louisville, Colo., is recalling about 1,100 rechargeable battery packs in the U.S and Canada. The power packs’ lithium ion...

Coleman recalls CTAC lithium-ion flashlights

The lithium-ion batteries can overheat, posing a fire hazard

The Coleman Company of Wichita, Kan., is recalling about 9,000 Coleman CTAC lithium-ion flashlights in the U.S and Canada.

 

The lithium-ion batteries can overheat, posing a fire hazard to consumers.

 

The company has received two reports of the flashlight batteries overheating, catching fire and causing minor property damage. No injuries have been reported.

 

This recall involves three models of Coleman CTAC Lithium-Ion Flashlights: CTAC20 (model 2000013874), CTAC40 (model 2000013873) and CTAC60 (model 2000013872).

 

The flashlights are black, with “Coleman” printed in white along the handle and have the model number in white print on the upper portion of the handle next to the light. The flashlights are 6.5 inches long.

 

The lithium-ion batteries inside the flashlights are red with the Coleman logo printed in white on the battery.

 

The flashlights, manufactured in China, were sold at Academy Sports + Outdoors, Green Supply, Sportsman’s Supply Company and sporting goods stores nationwide and online at www.coleman.com and www.amazon.com from January 2014, through August 2015, for between $65 and $75.

 

What to do

 

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled flashlights and contact Coleman for instructions on returning the flashlights for a full refund.

 

Consumers may contact Coleman at 800-835-3278 from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. (CT) Monday through Friday, by email at consumerservice@coleman.com or online at www.coleman.com and click on “Safety Information” under the “Customer Support” tab at the bottom of the page and then click on “CTAC Lithium-Ion Flashlight Recall” for more information.

 

The Coleman Company of Wichita, Kan., is recalling about 9,000 Coleman CTAC lithium-ion flashlights in the U.S and Canada. The lithium-ion batterie...

Toshiba recalls laptop computer battery packs

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat

Toshiba America Information Systems of Irvine, Calif., is recalling about 101,000 Panasonic battery packs used in Toshiba laptop computers in the U.S. and Canada.

 

The lithium-ion battery packs can overheat, posing burn and fire hazards to consumers.

 

The firm has received four reports of the battery packs overheating and melting. No injuries have been reported.

 

This recall involves Panasonic lithium-ion battery packs installed in 39 models of Toshiba Portege, Satellite, and Tecra laptops. The battery packs were also sold separately and also installed by Toshiba as part of a repair.

 

Battery packs included in this recall have part numbers that begin with G71C (G71C*******). Part numbers are printed on the battery pack. A complete list of battery pack part numbers included in this recall can be found on the firm’s website at http://go.toshiba.com/battery.

 

The battery packs, manufactured in China and Japan, were sold at Office Depot, Staples and other electronics stores nationwide, and online at Toshibadirect.com and other websites from June 2011, through January 2016, for between $500 and $1,000 for the laptop and between $70 and $130 for the battery pack.

 

What to do

 

Consumers should immediately go to the firm’s website and click on the battery pack utility link in the first shadowed box on the page. Consumers can also perform a manual check using the laptop and battery pack’s model, part and serial numbers. If it is part of the recall, consumers should power off the laptop, remove the battery and follow the instructions to obtain a free replacement battery pack. Until a replacement battery pack is received, consumers should use the laptop by plugging into AC power only.

 

Consumers may contact Toshiba toll-free at 866-224-1346 any day between 5 a.m. and 11 p.m. (PT), or online at http://go.toshiba.com/battery or at www.us.toshiba.com and click on “Consumer Notices” under the Support heading at the bottom of the page.

 

Toshiba America Information Systems of Irvine, Calif., is recalling about 101,000 Panasonic battery packs used in Toshiba laptop computers in the U.S. and...

Panasonic recalls lithium-ion laptop battery packs

Conductive foreign material was mixed into the battery cells during manufacturing

Panasonic Corporation of North America of Newark, N.J., is recalling about 500 lithium-ion (Li-ion) computer battery packs in the U.S. and Canada.

 

Conductive foreign material was mixed into the battery cells during manufacturing, posing a risk of fire.

 

No incidents or injuries have been reported

 

This recall involves Panasonic six-cell Li-ion battery packs sold in Panasonic CF-S10 Series laptop computers. “Panasonic” and “CF-S10” are on the surface of the laptop on the left side below the keyboard.

 

Battery packs with the following model numbers and production lot numbers are being recalled:

 

Model Numbers

Lot Numbers

CF-VZSU61U

BAW, BBX, BC, C1, C2

CF-VZSU61R

 

 

The model number and lot number are located on the battery pack nameplate.

 

The battery packs, manufactured in Japan, were sold at Panasonic dealers from December 2011, through August 2013, for about $2,000 for the laptop.

 

What to do

 

Consumers should immediately stop using the laptop computer with the recalled battery, power off the device, remove the battery pack and contact Panasonic for a free replacement battery pack.

 

Consumers may contact Panasonic toll-free at 855-772-8324 anytime or visit www.panasonic.com for more information.

 

 

Panasonic Corporation of North America of Newark, N.J., is recalling about 500 lithium-ion (Li-ion) computer battery packs in the U.S. and Canada. ...

Eastwood recalls multi-function power packs

The power packs' lithium ion batteries can burst during charging

Eastwood Co., of Pottstown, Pa., is recalling about 500 Rockwood multi-function power packs.

 

The power packs’ lithium ion batteries can burst during charging, posing a fire hazard.

 

There have been two reports of the battery packs’ lithium ion batteries bursting during charging and emitting black smoke, damaging carpet and leaving a black mark on a wall. No injuries have been reported.

 

This recall involves Rockwood portable power packs with lithium ion batteries and cables. They are used to charge a variety of electronic devices and car batteries and have a recessed LED flashlight.

 

The power packs have a black plastic cover with “Rockwood” printed in white on the top. They measure about 6 inches long, 3 inches wide and 1 inch tall. A yellow and white danger label is on the bottom. Item number 30554 is printed on the packaging.

 

The power packs, manufactured in China, were sold at Eastwood stores in Chicago, Parma, Ohio, and Pottstown, Pa., in Eastwood’s catalog and online at www.eastwood.com and other websites from January 2015, through October 2015, for between $50 and $110.

 

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled power packs and return them to Eastwood for a full refund.

 

Consumers may contact Eastwood at 800-345-1178 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. (ET) Monday through Friday or online at http://www.eastwood.com/images/recall_poster_r2_combined.pdf.

 

 

Eastwood Co., of Pottstown, Pa., is recalling about 500 Rockwood multi-function power packs.   The power packs’ lithium ion batteries can burst durin...

PNY recalls portable lithium polymer battery packs

Batteries can overheat and vent flames

PNY Technologies of Parsippany, N.J., is recalling about 56,800 portable lithium polymer battery packs in the U.S. and Canada.

 

Batteries can overheat and vent flames, posing fire and burn hazards.

 

The company has received one report of venting with flames. No injuries have been reported.

 

This recall involves portable lithium polymer battery packs with model number T10400 that are used to charge USB-enabled smartphones, tablets and other USB-powered devices.

 

The batteries are black or grey hand-held devices, 4 inches x 2.75 inches x 0.75 inches, with two USB outputs and four blue LED lights. PNY is laser-printed along the bottom on the front of the battery.

 

The battery packs, manufactured in China, were sold at Best Buy, Office Depot, Office Max and other retail stores nationwide and online at amazon.com and frys.com from January 2014, through August 2015, for about $50.

 

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled batteries and contact PNY for a free replacement rechargeable battery.

 

Consumers may contact PNY Technologies toll-free at 888-316-1194 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. (ET) Monday through Friday, online at www.pny.com and click on “Product Recall” under the “Support” menu at the bottom of the page, or by email at Tech-Support-T10400@pny.com.

 

 

PNY Technologies of Parsippany, N.J., is recalling about 56,800 portable lithium polymer battery packs in the U.S. and Canada. Batteries can overhe...

Battery packs for Fujitsu notebook computers recalled

The battery packs can overheat, posing a fire hazard

Fujitsu America of Sunnyvale, Calif., is recalling about 305 Fujitsu notebook computer battery packs in the U.S. and Canada.

 

The battery packs can overheat, posing a fire hazard.

 

The company has received three reports of the battery packs catching fire, including two in Japan and one in China and causing fire damage to rugs, bedding, a desk and other furniture. No injuries have been reported.

 

This recall involves Fujitsu lithium ion battery packs sold or provided as replacement battery packs for the following Fujitsu notebook computers: Celsius H720 and LIFEBOOK E752, P701, P702, P770, P771, P772, S752, S762 and T580. The battery packs were also sold separately. The black battery packs measure about 8 inches long, 2 inches wide and about 0.8 inches high.

 

Model number CP556150-1 including all serial numbers, and model number CP556150-2 with serial number range Z120102 through Z120512 are included in this recall. The model and serial numbers are printed on the white battery label. The notebook computer’s model number is printed on a label on the bottom of the notebook.

 

The batteries, manufactured in China, were sold online at www.shopfujitsu.com and other Web retailers from August 2012, through July 2015, for about $150.

 

Consumers should immediately turn off their Fujitsu notebook computer, remove the battery pack and contact Fujitsu for a free replacement battery pack. Consumers can continue to use their Fujitsu notebook computer without the battery pack by plugging in the AC adapter and power cord.

 

Consumers may contact Fujitsu at 800-838-5487 from 7 a.m. – 7 p.m. (CT) Monday – Friday or online at www.fujitsu.com/us and click on “Important Announcement: Voluntary Battery Recall and Replacement” for more information.

 

 

Fujitsu America of Sunnyvale, Calif., is recalling about 305 Fujitsu notebook computer battery packs in the U.S. and Canada. The battery packs can overhe...

NVIDIA recalls tablet computers

The lithium-ion battery in the tablets can overheat

NVIDIA Corp., of Santa Clara, Calif., is recalling about 88,000 NVIDIA SHIELD tablet computers in the U.S. and Canada.

 

The lithium-ion battery in the tablets can overheat, posing a fire hazard.

 

The company has received 4 reports of batteries overheating due to thermal runaway, including 2 reports of damage to flooring.

 

This recall involves NVIDIA SHIELD tablet computers with 8-inch touch screens. Model numbers P1761, P1761W and P1761WX and serial numbers 0410215901781 through 0425214604018 are included in this recall.

 

NVIDIA and the model and serial numbers are etched on the left side edge of the tablets. The SHIELD logo is on the back of the tablets.

 

The computers, manufactured in China, were sold at GameStop stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com, BestBuy.com, GameStop.com, NewEgg.com, TigerDirect.com and other websites from July 2014, through July 2015, for between $300 and $400.

 

Consumers should immediately stop using the tablets and contact NVIDIA for instructions on receiving a free replacement tablet.

 

Consumers may contact NVIDIA toll free at (888) 943-4196 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. PT Monday through Friday or online at www.nvidia.com and click on “NVIDIA Tablet Recall Program” at the bottom center of the page in green letters.

 

 

NVIDIA Corp., of Santa Clara, Calif., is recalling about 88,000 NVIDIA SHIELD tablet computers in the U.S. and Canada. The lithium-ion battery in the tabl...

Boeing: Lithium batteries an "unacceptable fire hazard" in cargo holds

The warning is expected to be heeded by most of the world's airlines

It's lithium ion batteries that power the iPhones, iPads and other iStuff that have come to be regarded as the essentials of life. Only problem is, they tend to catch fire, leading Boeing Co. to warn airlines that loading up their planes' cargo compartments with bulk battery shipments pose unacceptable fire hazards.

There've been plenty of cases of individual phones and other devices catching fire, both on the grund and in the air. Just one blazing phone is a problem; think what a blazing pallet of burning batteries could do.

That, says the Wall Street Journal, is what led Boeing to issue a formal warning to its customers, urging them to stop accepting large shipments of lithium batteries until safer packaging and fire protection efforts can be worked out.

Let them take a slow boat from China, Boeing advised, though not in so many words.

Nothing new

It's hardly a new problem. There have been many case over the years of cell phones igniting in people's pockets, on airplanes and in other inconvenient locations.

Last August, an airplane was evacuated in Tel Aviv after an iPhone 5 caught fire and filled the cabin with smoke. Last July, a smartphone caught fire under a 13-year-old girl's pillow in Dallas. And way back in 2008, a laptop computer caught fire in a vintage pickup truck in Nevada, destroying the truck, a Remington rifle and setting off two boxes of ammunition.

Boeing has reportedly been giving the no-big-battery-cartons advice to airlines who asked but has now issued a formal warning to all of the world's carriers, who are expected to comply. Airlines that disregard the warning would be on shaky legal ground in the event of a disaster attributed to flaming batteries.

Feds pondering

Boeing at least beat the U.S. government, which has been considering rules limited lithium batteries in carry-on luggage since 2007. In March 2007, the Department of Transportation said there had been five fires in airplane passenger cabins or cargo holds since 2005, a period of only two years.

Lithium metal batteries were banned from the cargo holds of U.S. airliners in 2004 but lithium ion batteries -- which are much more common -- are still good to go.

Lithium metal batteries are nonrechargeable while the lithium ion type is the one we're all familiar with -- requiring frequent plug-ins to keep the juices flowing.

The problem is that other things can get the juices flowing as well. Both types of batteries contain chemical-infused metals that get very hot very quickly if they come into contact with each other due to a short circuit or leaking seal. The result is a fast-spreading, very hot fire that is very difficult to extinguish.

While a single battery catching fire in a phone or laptop may start a small fire, a battery catching fire in a shipment of thousands of batteries could start a blaze that would quickly become catastrophic. 

Many airlines have already stopped accepting battery shipments and Boening's warning may push the recalcitrants to act as well. While Boeing's warning doesn't have the force of law, airlines nearly always comply with formal warnings from manufacturers, so Boeing may have accomplished what governments so far have not gotten around to.

It's lithium ion batteries that power the iPhones, iPads and other iStuff that have come to be regarded as the essentials of l...

The incredible exploding laptop; or, why you should never use “third-party” rechargeable batteries

Powering rechargeable electronics is one area where brand loyalty makes good sense

Everybody's always looking for ways to save money, especially In this economy, and one common money-saving tip you'll often hear is to watch out for excessive “brand loyalty.”

Sometimes people let themselves get so accustomed to paying premium prices for Brand A, they overlook Brand X which works just as well for a considerably lower price.

Various types of brand loyalty which serve only to empty your wallet include paying extra for clothing just because it has a designer's name on the label, or overlooking store-brand foods which are often made by name-brand companies, only without the fancy packaging.

That said, while most flavors of brand loyalty are potential money-wasters, there are a few areas where it makes good economic sense and one where it's downright mandatory: power sources for electronic devices with rechargeable batteries, such as phones, laptops, tablets and even e-cigarettes.

No matter which manufacturer made your devices, you should always stick with manufacturer-approved batteries, chargers and other accessories, rather than buy third-party products which might prove dangerously incompatible with your device.

At best, third-party batteries will likely void your manufacturer's warranty. At worst, they can make your devices overheat, catch fire or even explode. It happened to Ginny in Thousand Oaks, California, who wrote to share her story with us so that others might learn from her family's dangerously close call:

I'm still recovering from an adrenaline rush after yesterday when my daughter's Toshiba laptop caught on fire and exploded! …. It *could have* blown up in my face but I ran fast enough to throw it out the front door first, and then my son's who threw it again away from the house. These are the things that keep going through my mind.

The only damage was the laptop and my nerves (and a scorched wall, burned comforter and dirty smoke) but I want to share my experience because I had NO idea this could happen!

Got too hot

Ginny's 13-year-old daughter was reclining on her bed doing homework on her laptop when “it got too hot and she smelled smoke.” She immediately unplugged the laptop and turned it off, but it was too late:

It was BAD; there was toxic smoke, flames, shrapnel and the fire doesn't go out no matter what you try; it was like a nuclear reactor meltdown sans radiation (I hope lol) that gets bigger instead of smaller until it blows up and doesn't stop for a long time.

When lithium-ion batteries catch on fire, they genuinely are very difficult to extinguish: they can reach temperatures of up to 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit, and they also might explode (which are two reasons why bulk shipments of lithium-ion batteries have been banned on U.S. passenger flights for over a decade now, since 2004). Ginny understandably found herself badly shaken by the incident:

I am buying a "Class D" fire extinguisher or two today after watching a YouTube warning, but I am not sure that would stopped the exploding lithium batteries …. I had NO idea this was a possibility. The laptop always ran hot - it was old and we bought it used. We got a new fan, and recently replaced the battery.

Uh-oh. Replaced the battery? We asked Ginny if the new battery was Toshiba-approved, or made by a third party.

I'm afraid the batteries were 3rd party. My husband had just replaced them because the Toshiba battery died, but I didn't realize he had done that. I never use 3rd party batteries in my cameras and would have objected to them if I had known but he likes to save money (hah! House fires aren't cheap, nor is the burn center, worst case scenario).

Not unusual

Ginny's wasn't the only family to suffer a close call thanks to a third-party battery. Last July, a 13-year-old in Texas accidentally set her bed on fire with her smartphone, which was not only powered by a third-party battery, but ended up under her pillow one night, so that the heat generated by the battery had no place to dissipate and made the pillow start smoldering.

The next month, an airplane about to take off from a runway in Tel Aviv instead had to be evacuated, after the battery in a passenger's iPhone caught fire.

Not that such fires are anything new. Back in 2004, a California teenager suffered second-degree burns when her cell phone caught fire without warning. A local fire investigator said the phone suddenly burst into “fist-sized flames,” and suspected an overheating lithium battery was to blame.

By 2005, the feds were warning consumers about the fire hazards and related dangers posed by rechargeable batteries. That March, for example, the Consumer Product Safety Commission issued a list of “cell phone safety tips” and the first item was this: never use incompatible cell phone batteries and chargers. Whichever brand of phone you have, you must stick with manufacturer-approved batteries rather than buy from third-party sources, as the manufacturers can't guarantee that third-party devices are compatible with their devices.

To protect yourself and keep your house safe from such fire hazards, the three most important pieces of advice are:

  • always use manufacturer-approved batteries and chargers for your smartphone, laptop, tablet or any other device;
  • never leave the devices plugged in overnight or while you're away from home; and,
  • especially while the devices are turned on, do not cover them with blankets, pillows or anything else capable of restricting airflow and preventing heat from dissipating.

As Ginny ruefully noted: “I knew that third-party batteries might hurt my camera, but I didn't know they might hurt me.” 

Everybody's always looking for ways to save money, especially In this economy, and one common money-saving tip you'll often hear is to watch out for excess...

Burning iPhone battery forces airplane evacuation

Lithium-ion devices can be dangerous, especially with third-party batteries

An airplane in Tel Aviv had to be evacuated earlier this week after the lithium-ion battery powering a passenger's iPhone 5 caught on fire, filling the cabin with smoke.

Gizmodo India reports that “It is well within the realms of possibility that it could be a third party or unauthorized battery in the device that may have caused the incident.”

Using third-party (as opposed to manufacturer-approved) batteries or chargers in smartphones and other lithium-battery-powered devices is indeed dangerous. As early as 2005, the feds were issuing warnings about the fire hazards of lithium batteries, and advised consumers to never use incompatible cell phone batteries and chargers.

In 2004, a California teenager suffered second-degree burns when her cell phone caught on fire without warning; a local fire investigator said the phone suddenly burst into “fist-sized flames,” and suspected that an overheating lithium battery was to blame.

Danger goes unheeded

Unfortunately, even nine years later, many people remain completely unaware of such dangers. Just last month, a 13-year-old in Texas had her bedding catch on fire after the third-party battery in her smartphone overheated and started smoldering. Luckily, she wasn't hurt and, while the fire did destroy her bed and bedding, it was extinguished before it could spread to the rest of the house.

The problem is not limited to smartphones, with or without manufacturer-approved batteries. Bulk shipments of any lithium batteries on passenger flights have been banned since 2004, because when bulk piles of such batteries catch on fire, that fire is very difficult to put out (especially on an in-flight airplane).

In 2007, the feds considered new restrictions for transporting lithium batteries on airplanes, but said at the time it had no plans to prohibit passengers from carrying battery-operated devices with them; only checked baggage and cargo would be affected.

Other hazards

Other lithium-ion battery products have proved to be fire hazards over the past few months. Last February, Bombardier Recreational Products recalled over 1,600 pairs of heated gloves and their rechargeable batteries, because the batteries could overheat and cause a fire hazard. A week earlier, Lucent Ace recalled some of its LED flashlights because their lithium batteries could short out, rupturing their canisters and burning their owners.

Certain brands of e-cigarette batteries have also either caught fire or exploded. In March, fire marshals in Oregon blamed e-cigs for two nighttime fires: the batteries overheated while recharging. That's why anyone who uses e-cigarettes (or any other rechargeable electronic device, for that matter) should never leave their devices plugged in overnight, or when nobody is home.

So what can you do to keep yourself and your house safe from such fire hazards? The three most important pieces of advice are: always use manufacturer-approved batteries and chargers for your smartphone, laptop, tablet or any other device; never leave the devices plugged in overnight or while you're away; and, especially while the devices are turned on, do not cover them with blankets, pillows or anything else capable of restricting airflow and preventing heat from dissipating.

(That's why the teenager in Texas had her phone catch fire last month: not only was it powered by a third-party battery, but the girl took it to bed with her and over the course of the night, it somehow ended up under her pillow.)

You should also keep an eye out for recalls of any other lithium-battery products, to make sure none of them apply to things you've bought.

And remember that, as of last month, all flyers in American airspace are required to have their smartphones, laptops and other battery-operated devices fully charged and capable of being turned on, because if any such device has a dead battery, TSA will assume it is a bomb.

An airplane in Tel Aviv had to be evacuated earlier this week after the lithium-ion battery powering a passenger's iPhone 5 caught on fire, filling the cab...

Reminder: Smartphone batteries can be dangerous

Counterfeit batteries, poor handling and damage can all lead to problems

Batteries are everywhere but, as Boeing's problems with its 787 Dreamliner show, they can be the source of serious safety issues. And the lithium-ion batteries that power our smartphones are no exception.

Lithium-ion batteries hold a lot of energy in a small package.  They offer numerous advantages over other types of batteries, including the capacity to hold their charge longer and the ability to be recharged numerous times.  Yet, lithium-ion batteries are more sensitive to physical stress than the alkaline batteries found in toys and flashlights and they need to be treated with more care.

With wireless devices now outnumbering humans in the United States, there are lots of these little powerhouses floating around out there, which has inspired the Consumer Product Safety Commission and CTIA, the trade association that represents the mobile phone industry, to issue some safety guidelines:

1) Do not use batteries and chargers that are incompatible with your mobile device.  Some websites and secondhand dealers sell incompatible, counterfeit, or poorly manufactured batteries and chargers.  Consumers should buy only manufacturer- or carrier-recommended products and accessories.  
2) Do not let a loose battery come in contact with metal objects, such as coins, keys, or jewelry.  Metal objects can cross the electrical connections and cause an incident.
3) Do not crush, puncture or put a high degree of pressure on the battery, as this can cause an internal short-circuit, resulting in overheating.
4) Do not place the phone or batteries in areas that may get very hot, such as on or near a cooking surface, cooking appliance, iron, or radiator.
5) Avoid dropping the mobile device.  Dropping it, especially on a hard surface, can potentially cause damage to the device and battery.  If you suspect damage to the device or battery, take it to a service center for inspection.
6) Do not let your mobile device or battery get wet.  Even though the device will dry out and may appear to operate normally, the battery contacts or circuitry could slowly corrode and pose a safety hazard.
7) Follow battery usage, storage, and charging guidelines found in the user's guide.

All this might sound a little alarmist, but there have been a number of incidents over the last decade or so that could easily have turned into major disasters.

For example, in 2011, an iPhone started to smoke aboard an Australian airliner. In 2004, a California teen suffered burns when her Kyocera cell phone caught fire, bursting into "fist-sized flames." 

Batteries are everywhere but, as Boeing's problems with its 787 Dreamliner show, they can be the source of serious safety issues. And the lithium-ion batte...

Mitsubishi recalls batteries used in 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV vehicles

Reduced voltage in the batteries could increase the risk of a crash

Mitsubishi Motors North America is recalling replacement lithium-ion batteries installed on certain 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV vehicles. The batteries were manufactured December 18, 2012, through December 21, 2012.

The batteries may have internal contamination possibly causing reduced voltage. Also, the batteries may also develop a short-circuit during charging. Internal contamination of the battery may cause reduced voltage resulting in a stall-like condition, increasing the risk of a crash.

Mitsubishi will notify the owners instructing them to take their vehicle to a dealer where the batteries will be replaced free of charge. The manufacturer has not yet provided a notification schedule.

Owners may contact Mitsubishi at 1-800-222-0307. Mitsubishi's recall number is SR-13-006.

Mitsubishi Motors North America is recalling replacement lithium-ion batteries installed on certain 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV vehicles. The batteries were man...

AT&T;, Motorola, Qwest, V-Tech Telephone Batteries Recalled


Lenmar Enterprises is recalling about 1,400 rechargeable batteries used in wireless phones. The batteries can overheat, posing a fire and burn hazard to consumers.

The firm has received six reports of batteries overheating, resulting in deformation of phones. No injuries have been reported.

The recall involves the rechargeable batteries with the model number CB0217 2.4 volt 1500 mAh NiMH. Only batteries with date code 0809 are affected by this recall. The date code can be found on the back of the battery. The batteries were sold as replacement batteries for the following phones:

AT&TMotorolaQwestV-Tech
2401BY03LQW-24222420
2462MD60QW-26522422
5840MD671  
E2562MD680  
 MD681  

The batteries were sold to electrical product distributors and retailers nationwide and at Lenmar.com from July 2009 through August 2009 for about $18. They were made in China.

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled batteries and contact Lenmar to receive a free replacement.

Consumer Contact: Consumers can contact Lenmar at (800) 424-2703 between 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. PT Monday through Friday or visit the companys Web site at www.Lenmar.com

The recall is being conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

AT&T, Motorola, Qwest, V-Tech Telephone Batteries Recalled...

Race To Replace Gas With Green Batteries

Battery could store almost as much energy as a tank of gas

January 4, 2010
Researchers are exploring the promise of lithium-air battery technology as an environmentally sound way to fuel the world's growing transportation needs.

Li-air batteries, as they are known, use a catalytic air cathode that supplies oxygen, an electrolyte and a lithium anode. The technology has the potential to store almost as much energy as a tank of gasoline, and will have a capacity for energy storage that is five to 10 times greater than that of Li-ion batteries, a bridge technology.

That potential, however, will not be realized until a number of critical scientific challenges are solved.

"The obstacles to Li-air batteries becoming a viable technology are formidable and will require innovations in materials science, chemistry, and engineering," says Eric Isaacs, director of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory.

"This is not a near-term technology," adds Jeff Chamberlain, senior account manager in Argonne's Office of Technology Transfer. "It is going to take time and collaborations across several scientific disciplines to address the four main challenges of this battery development effort: safety, cost, life, and performance."

To accomplish this task, Argonne's research will continue to span basic, applied, and theoretical sciences and will utilize the lab's research facilities -- the Advanced Photon Source, the Center for Nanoscale Materials, and the Leadership Computing Facility -- and work with industry, which will eventually adopt the technology for commercial application.

Argonne has worked with several industrial partners on the commercialization of Li-ion batteries and battery materials, including companies such as EnerDel, Envia, BASF, and Toda America.

It currently is working with the Commonwealth of Kentucky to develop the Kentucky-Argonne National Battery Manufacturing Center, which will support the development of a viable U.S. battery manufacturing industry.

More recently, DOE awarded the lab $8.8 million to build out and outfit three battery research facilities that will be used for battery prototyping, materials production scale-up, and post-test analysis.

Race To Replace Gas With Green Batteries...

New Rule Limits Lithium Batteries in Carry-on Baggage

Batteries can start hard-to-fight fires

Under a new rule that took effect yesterday, passengers can no longer pack loose lithium batteries in checked luggage on aircraft.

There have been at least nine fires involving lithium batteries on airplanes or in cargo destined for planes since 2005, federal safety records indicate.

Passengers are still allowed to carry the batteries in checked baggage if they are installed in electronic devices, or in carry-on baggage if stored in plastic bags.

Common consumer electronics such as travel cameras, cell phones, and most laptop computers are still allowed in carry-on and checked luggage.

But the rule limits travelers to bringing only two extended-life spare rechargeable lithium batteries, such as laptop and professional audio/video/camera equipment lithium batteries in carry-on baggage.

Doing something as simple as keeping a spare battery in its original retail packaging or a plastic zip-lock bag will prevent unintentional short-circuiting and fires, said Krista Edwards, Deputy Administrator of the U.S. Department of Transportations Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

Series of fires

Lithium batteries are considered hazardous materials because they can overheat and ignite in certain conditions, and there has been a series of fires and meltdowns involving laptops, cell phones and other electronic devices in recent years.

In 2006, a man in South Venice, Fla. blamed his Dell laptop for burning down his house. Last year, a Macbook was blamed for a house fire in Australia.

In one of the most celebrated cases, a Dell laptop was blamed for setting fire to a pickup truck parked in a remote mountainous area in Nevada last August. The fire not only destroyed the truck but set off a box of ammunition its outdoorsman owner had left in the glove compartment while he went fishing.

Fires hard to fight

Safety testing conducted by the FAA found that current aircraft cargo fire suppression system would not be capable of suppressing a fire if a shipment of non-rechargeable lithium batteries were ignited in flight.

This rule protects the passenger, said Lynne Osmus, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) assistant administrator for security and hazardous materials. Its one more step for safety. Its the right thing to do and the right time to do it.

Two kinds

Lithium batteries come in two forms. The lithium metal batteries are single-use and the lithium-ion can be recharged. Both store energy that generates intense heat in the event of a short circuit, if metal touches both terminals or if internal seals fail.

In many cases, low-cost or counterfeit batteries lack safeguards against short circuits. More than 4 million lithium batteries of all sorts have been recalled in recent years.

Bulk shipments of lithium metal batteries were banned on passenger flights in 2004, in part because fires in those batteries are especially hard to extinguish.

 



New Rule Limits Lithium Batteries in Carry-on Baggage...

Lithium Ion Batteries to Power Mercedes Luxury Hybrid

Mercedes confident the batteries will be safe

By Joe Benton
ConsumerAffairs.com

September 11, 2007
Mercedes-Benz will be the first automaker to offer consumers a hybrid vehicle powered in part by lithium ion batteries.

Mercedes plans to build a "mild hybrid" version of the S-class sedan in 2009. Details of when the car might be on sale in the U.S. are not available.

Toyota Motor Corp. had planned to equip its hybrids with the powerful lithium ion batteries but has delayed production because of safety concerns until 2010 or 2011.

Mercedes executives, speaking at the Frankfurt auto show, said the 2009 S 400 will have a mild hybrid powertrain with an electric motor that also acts as a starter-generator.

The said the batteries will be supplied by Johnson Controls-Saft, a joint venture formed last year by the U.S. interior supplier and the French battery maker, according to Mercedes executives.

Johnson Controls-Saft expects to complete a new plant to manufacture lithium ion batteries for its European customers this year. The plant is in Nersac, France.

Although the battery pack in the S 400 won't be under as much strain as batteries in a fully battery powered hybrid, engineers at Johnson Controls-Saft submitted the batteries to the same rigorous testing as those that will be used in full hybrids, according to the company.

"We're confident in our design and approach to safety management," said CEO Mary Ann Wright, who oversees the engineers designing and developing the batteries.

The hybrid version of the S 400 will be able to accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in 7.3 seconds, according to the German automaker. Mercedes also claims that the S 400 will be the most fuel-efficient luxury sedan in the world.

Lithium ion batteries are still under testing and development for use in most hybrid because the batteries can overheat and catch fire. There have been numerous incidents in recent years of laptop computers and cell phones suddenly bursting into flames.

Automobile engineers are working on technology to use the lithium ion battery, however, as a replacement for the nickel-metal hydride batteries used in hybrids like the Prius now.

Lithium ion batteries are any important part of the future of plug-in hybrids that will be charged overnight with household electrical current, reducing the need to consume gasoline.

Lithium Ion Batteries to Power Mercedes Luxury Hybrid...

Nokia Joins Battery Recall

Cell phone batteries can overheat and catch fire


Its not just overheating batteries in notebook computers you have to worry about. Lithium-ion batteries in cell phones also pose a potential fire hazard, and phone maker Nokia has recalled 46 million such batteries.

The batteries, identified as BL-5C, were produced by Matsushita Battery Industrial company of Japan from December 2005 to November 2006. Nokia said a fire hazard potentially exists when the batteries short circuit during recharging. Nokia is offering its customers replacement batteries.

A year ago Sony was forced to recall more than 10 million notebook computers after it was determined the lithium-ion batteries that powered them could present a fire hazard. In some cases consumers posted videos online showing their laptops bursting into flames.

A year ago ConsumerAffairs.com reported on two outdoorsmen whose vehicle was destroyed by fire when a Dell laptop computer in the vehicle burst into flames.

Twelve months later the computer battery recalls continued, with Sony recalling another 1,400 laptop batteries made for Toshiba.

As for the cell phone batteries, Nokia says the chances of a fire are remote. A spokesman notes there have been 100 reported problems out of 300 million batteries sold.

To see if your cell phone is included in the recall, check the Nokia Web site..

Nokia Joins Battery Recall...

Batteries Could Run on Sugar

New Technology Could Cut Risk of Cell Phone, Laptop Fires

Scientists have revealed a sweet alternative to lithium ion batteries: batteries that run on sugar.

Researches from St. Louis University (SLU) say they have developed a fuel cell battery that runs on virtually any source of sugar including tree sap, soft drinks and sugar water. They believe the batteries could provide a charge three to four times longer than lithium ion batteries and may replace those batteries which are now used in many portable devices including laptops, mp3 players and cell phones.

"This study shows that renewable fuels can be directly employed in batteries at room temperature to lead to more energy-efficient battery technology than metal-based approaches," study leader Shelley Minteer, Ph.D., an electrochemist at SLU said in a prepared statement.

Scientists from SLU revealed their findings at the 233rd national meeting of the American Chemical Society in Chicago over the weekend.

The scientists said the batteries are good for the environment because water is the main byproduct.

"It demonstrates that by bridging biology and chemistry, we can build a better battery that's also cleaner for the environment," Minteer said in the statement.

One of the major concerns with lithium ion batteries is their propensity to overheat and on rare occasions, catch fire and explode. This was highlighted this past summer with the recall of more than 10 million Sony-made laptop batteries.

But Minteer told ConsumerAffairs.com that her batteries pose no fire risk.

Minteer has successfully tested the technology by running a calculator with a battery the size of a postage stamp. So far flat soft drinks, tree sap, glucose and sweetened drink mixes have powered the calculator. Minteer said she has had the most promising results from table sugar dissolved in water.

Although Minteer is not the first to develop a battery that runs on sugar, she said hers is the longest-lasting and most powerful type to date.

If research continues to show promise, the battery could be ready for commercialization in 3-5 years Minteer said.

Consumers are not the only ones to potentially benefit from this technology. The study, which the U.S. Department of Defense funded, may develop a portable energy source for troops on the battlefield who may have limited access to technology. The batteries could potentially be recharged by adding sugar or sap from trees or even cacti.

Batteries Could Run on Sugar...

Feds Consider New Lithium Battery Restrictions on Airplanes

Battery makers say no need for restrictions on laptops, cell phones

The Department of Transportation is looking at new restrictions for transporting lithium batteries on airplanes but there are no plans to ban the batteries from carry-on luggage and it's like that only checked baggage would be affected.

Battery industry representatives have acknowledged that some restrictions may be needed, but insist that there is no need to ban laptops, cell phones or other devices from airplanes.

Federal reports indicat at least nine fires involving lithium batteries have happened on airplanes or in cargo destined for planes since 2005.

The Federal Aviation Administration is asking companies that make and ship the batteries to take voluntary steps to ease fire risks. The agencies also will launch a safety awareness campaign for passengers.

Lithium batteries come in two forms. The lithium metal batteries are single-use and the lithium-ion can be recharged. Both store energy that generates intense heat in the event of a short circuit, if metal touches both terminals or if internal seals fail.

In many cases, low-cost or counterfeit batteries lack safeguards against short circuits.

In the last year, more than 4 million lithium batteries or all sorts have been recalled.

Bulk shipments of lithium metal batteries were banned on passenger flights in 2004, in part because fires in those batteries are especially hard to extinguish.



Feds Consider New Lithium Battery Restrictions on Airplanes...

Sony Battery Recall Tops 10 Million

Fire Hazard Prompts Further Recalls

The bad news continues for Sony. The electronics giant says it will now recall more than 10 million of its lithium ion batteries, used to power laptop computers, because of concerns about a possible fire hazard.

Previously, nearly seven million batteries had been recalled from Dell, Apple, Toshiba, Lenovo and IBM computer users.

The company announced the recall Friday, saying it would provide replacement batteries.

The latest recall came earlier this week when Chinese computer maker Lenovo said it would recall 526,000 batteries. The same day, Toshiba Corp. and Fujitsu Ltd. also announced they would recall Sony-made batteries from users.

Sony's batteries are also used in Sony-made computers and those of Hitachi Ltd., Sharp Corp. and Hewlett-Packard.

Published reports say Sony reached its decision to increase the recall after talks with the Consumer Product Safety Commission, but a company spokesman in Tokyo said the recall remain voluntary. Sony has yet to announce which types of computers will have batteries recalled and how replacement services will take place.

However, soon after the announcement, Japanese electronics giant Toshiba said it was recalling batteries from the dynabook, Satellite, Qosmio, Tecra and Portege laptop models, a move expected to affect 830,000 computers worldwide.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports that it is aware of at least 47 incidents related to defective laptop batteries. Among the most alarming incidents - a laptop that caught fire during a flight and another that burst into flames in a pickup truck, totally destroying the vehicle.

A man in South Venice, Fla. believes his Dell laptop is the cause of his house burning down. Louis Minnear said he found his couch engulfed in flames in the middle of the night.

 

Sony Battery Recall Tops 10 Million...

"Thin-Film" Batteries May Reduce Fire Danger

Recent Laptop Recalls Energize Battery Research



A new, safer battery technology called thin-film, may be replacing the somewhat volatile lithium-ion battery. The recent Dell, Apple and Panasonic recalls of almost 6 million laptop batteries has had a catalytic affect on thin-film battery research.

Thin-film batteries have a solid lithium core compared to the liquid core of the lithium-ion batteries. That solid core makes them less vulnerable to overheating and they can be fully discharged and recharged well more than 10,000 times.

"In comparison, a typical Li-ion battery can only be cycled about 300-500 times without significant degradation in capacity," Infinite Power Solutions spokesman, Tim Bradow wrote in an e-mail.

Infinite Power Solutions (IPS), a battery company in Golden, Colo. announced yesterday that it has received $34.7 million in investments from private firms that will allow the company to begin production of thin-film batteries next year.

"This new capital will enable us to scale our technology, build state-of-the-art fabs, and ramp to high volume production," Raymond Johnson, president and CEO of IPS said in a prepared statement.

Lithium-ion batteries can generate a tremendous amount of heat while charging and can occasionally burst into flames under the right conditions. ConsumerAffairs.com reported on how the batteries in Dell laptops possibly caught a man's truck on fire and even burned another man's house down. Even the lithium-ion batteries in cell phones are suspect to overheating and fire. Thin-film batteries do not pose a fire hazard.

"Because they have a solid-state electrolyte, they will not freeze or boil," wrote Bradow. "Therefore, they continue to work at very cold temps (-50C) and will not rupture or explode at very high temps (>200C). They are fabricated in a vacuum environment, so they will not outgas in a high temp environment. They will not burn. In fact, even under a direct short circuit condition, the temperature of single cell only increases 1C. Therefore, it is impossible to over heat and start a fire."


However, analysts say it could be many years before thin-film could completely replace lithium-ion.

"There is not one piece of consumer or enterprise technology that can run on thin-film battery technology," Carmi Levy, senior research analyst with Infotech Research Group in London, Ontario told The New York Times. "Every piece of circuitry must be fully re-engineered. It is a Herculean engineering feat to switch over to this."

As a result, the thin-film industry is focusing on enterprise technology markets to begin with such as radio-frequency identity (RFID) tags, smart cards, military equipment, surgical devices such as pacemakers and temperature and pressure gauges in car tires.

"It will take time to ramp production and license our technology to others for high volume manufacturing," wrote Bradow.

Thin-film batteries are extremely versatile. They can be smaller than a postage stamp and about twice its thickness, can be manufactured in various shapes and can be attached directly to a microchip.

The batteries can also have a long charge life. After being charged they can go into a standby mode for months without leaking any power. That long life would be useful for many applications including implanted surgical devices and missiles that are stored in silos for years without any activity.

"The end user will not see the battery, nor will they need to because it never needs replacement, only recharging," wrote Bradow.

Susan Eustis, president of WinterGreen Research in Lexington, Mass. has high hopes for the technology. She told the Times that with increasing cell phone sales and uses for RFID tags, the market for thin-film battery sales should approach 10 billion units by 2012.

Sony, Apple and Dell did not return phone calls for comment.

 

Thin-Film Batteries May Reduce Fire Danger...

Teen Burned When Cell Phone Catches Fire

Kyocera Wireless 2325 cell phone caught fire

A California teen suffered second-degree burns when her Kyocera Wireless 2325 cell phone caught fire, according to local fire investigators.

The 16-year-old Ontario girl's phone burst into "fist-size flames" without warning, said Frank Huddleston, an investigator at the Ontario fire department. Huddleston said he suspects the phone's battery overheated.

Witnesses said the victim had the phone in her back pocket, when it "let out a whoosh," bulged, then shot out flames and smoke. She was treated for second-degree burns and released.

Huddleston said there were no sources of flame nearby. He said witnesses saw flames coming from the bottom of the phone, near vents that are intended to prevent overheating batteries from exploding.

Kyocera issued a recall of about 140,000 batteries used in Kyocera Model 7135 Smartphones in January. The recall announcement said the batteries can short-circuit and erupt with force or emit excessive heat, posing a burn hazard to consumers.

In January, the Consumer Product Safety Commission issued its first-ever recall of cell phone batteries, some 40,000 from Coslight International Group in Hong Kong. The batteries were on four phones, all Kyocera Wireless models that overheated. One person was slightly injured from the defect. The batteries were also available from Verizon Wireless and Alltel.

There have been other incidents involving portable phones overheating and exploding, raising concerns about the safety of jamming the devices into pockets, purses and briefcases and holding them against the face.

 

A California teen suffered second-degree burns when her Kyocera Wireless 2325 cell phone caught fire, according to local fire investigators....

Dorcy Xenon Flashlight's Fuji Batteries

February 3, 2004
Fuji batteries sold with Dorcy Xenon flashlights are being recalled. The batteries may overheat, leak, or rupture, presenting a potential for fire and injury.

The recall affects Fuji Power and A&T Fuji Power CR123A 3-volt lithium batteries originally provided with the Dorcy Spyder Tactical Xenon Light (Product 41-4200), also sold in packages of two flashlights under the name Dorcy Xenon Tactical Light.

Five reports have been received about batteries overheating and causing the flashlight to burst. Dorcy has received four reports of minor damage to clothing and personal items and burn injuries. In one case, the batteries allegedly caused or contributed to a house fire.

Each of the 3-volt lithium batteries has a white label with the words "Fuji Power" or "A&T Fuji Power CR123A." The batteries were provided separately in pairs in packaging with the flashlights.

The flashlights were sold by national retailers including BJ's Wholesale Club, Orchard Supply Hardware, Ace Hardware, Tru Value Hardware, Meijer Stores, Fred Meyer, Marvins, Sport Chalet, and Sportsman Guide.

Call Dorcy International Inc. toll-free at (800) 837-8558 to receive free replacement batteries for each pair of batteries originally provided with the Spyder Tactical Xenon Light or the Xenon Tactical Light. Consumers also can return the flashlights to the store for a refund or replacement.

Consumer Contact: Call Dorcy International Inc. toll-free at (800) 837- 8558 Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET. Dorcys web site is www.dorcy.com.

The recall is being conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

Dorcy Xenon Flashlight's Fuji Batteries...

Browning Recalls Flashlight Batteries

January 21, 2004
Browning is recalling the CR123A lithium batteries sold with Browning Black Ice flashlights. The batteries can short out, causing the flashlight's canister to rupture and possibly injure the user.

There have been two reports of the flashlights rupturing. No injuries have been reported.

The recalled 3-volt lithium batteries were packaged in pairs with Browning Black Ice 6-volt Xenon 6 LED flashlights. The batteries were also sold separately in packs of two. No other Black Ice model flashlights are involved in this recall.

The flashlights were sold at hunting and sporting goods stores nationwide during December 2003 for about $50.

Consumers should remove the batteries from the flashlights and contact Browning for information on receiving a refund or replacement.

Consumer Contact: Contact Browning at (800) 637-0230 between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. MT Monday through Friday or visit the firms Web site at www.Browning.com/recall.

Browning Recalls Flashlight Batteries...